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Insights, Intelligence and Inspiration found at #AHIMACon18 – HIM Scene

Posted on October 15, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Beth Friedman, BSHA, RHIT.

Last month’s HIM Scene predicted important HIM insights would be gained at the 90th AHIMA Annual Convention. And this prediction certainly came true! Thousands of HIM professionals discussed changes to E&M coding, physician documentation and information security during the organization’s Miami event. HIM’s expanding role in healthcare analytics was also recognized. Half of AHIMA’s “hot topics” presentations covered data collection, analytics, sharing, structure and governance.

For example, HIM’s role in IT project management was the focus of an information-packed session led by Angela Rose, MHA, RHIA, CHPS, FAHIMA, Vice President, Implementation Services at MRO. She emphasized how enterprise-wide IT projects benefit from HIM’s knowledge of the patient’s health record, encounter data, how information is processed and where information flows. In today’s rapid IT environment, there is a myriad of new opportunities for HIM—the annual AHIMA convention casts light on them all.

Amid all the futurecasting, AHIMA attendees also received valuable insights and fundamental best-practice advice for the profession’s stalwart tasks: enterprise master person index (EMPI), clinical coding and release of information (ROI). Here are few of the highlights.

Merger Mania Brings Duplicate Data Challenges

Every healthcare merger includes strategic discussions, planning and investments focused on health IT. System consolidation can’t be avoided—and it shouldn’t be. Economies of scale are a fundamental element of merger success. However, merging multiple systems into one means merging multiple master person indexes (MPIs).

Letha Stewart, MA, RHIA, Director of Customer Relations, QuadraMed states, “It’s not uncommon to see duplicate medical record rates jump from an industry average of 8-12 percent to over 50 percent during IT system mergers due to the high volume of overlapping records that result when trying to merge records from multiple systems or domains”. As entities come together, a single, clean EMPI is fundamental for patient care, safety, billing and revenue. This is where HIM skills and know-how are essential.

Instead of leaving HIM to perform the onerous task of duplicate data cleanup after a merger and IT system consolidation, Stewart suggests a more proactive approach. Here are four quick takeaways from our meeting:

  • Identify duplicate data issues during the planning process before new systems are implemented or merged.
  • Use a probabilistic duplicate detection algorithm to find a higher number of valid duplicates and lower number of false positives.
  • Clean up each system’s MPI before IT system consolidation occurs and as implementations proceed. Be sure to allocate sufficient time for this process prior to the conversion.
  • Maintain ongoing duplicate data detection against the new enterprise patient population to prevent future issues.

Maintaining a clean MPI has always been a core HIM function—even back to the days of patient index cards and rotating metal bins. Technology in combination with merger mania has certainly upped the ante and elevated HIM’s role.

Release of Information Panel Raises Red Flags for Bad Attorney Behavior

Another traditional HIM function with nascent issues is ROI. A standing-room-only panel session raised eyebrows and concern for AHIMA attendees regarding a pervasive issue for most HIM departments: patient-directed requests.

Rita Bowen, MA, RHIA, CHPS, CHPC, SSGB, VP Privacy, Compliance and HIM Privacy, MRO, moderated the panel that included other ROI and disclosure management experts. Bowen, a healthcare privacy savant, asked how many attendees receive patient-directed requests that are actually initiated by an attorney’s office. Dozens of hands went up and the discourse began. Here’s the issue.

To avoid paying providers’ fees for record retrieval and copies, attorneys are requesting medical records for legal matters under the guise of a patient-directed request. During the session, four recommended strategies emerged:

  • Inform your state legislators of this bad attorney behavior
  • Discuss the issue with HIM peers in your area
  • Hold meetings with your OCR representative to determine the best course of action
  • Question and verify suspicious patient-directed requests to clarify and confirm the consent

Finally, no AHIMA convention would be complete without significant attention to clinical coding!

Coding Accuracy Takes Center Stage

One of the AHIMA convention’s annual traditions includes announcement of Central Learning’s annual national coding contest results. Eileen Tkacik, Vice President, Information Technology at Pena4, sponsor of the 3rd annual nationwide coding contest to measure coding accuracy, reported that inpatient coding accuracy fell slightly in 2018 compared with the 2017 results. “Average accuracy scores for inpatient ICD-10 coding hovered at 57.5 percent while outpatient coding accuracy experienced a slight bump from 41 percent in 2017 to 42.5 percent in 2018,” according to Tkacik.

While some were concerned about the results, others expected a decline as payers become more aggressive with coding denials and impose greater restrictions on coders’ ability to determine clinical justification. This is especially true for chronic conditions—another hot coding topic among AHIMA attendees.

Nena Scott, MSEd, RHIA, CCS, CCS-P, CCDS, Director of Coding Quality and Professional Development at TrustHCS, emphasized the need for accurate hierarchical condition category (HCC) code assignment for proper risk adjustment factor (RAF) scoring under value-based reimbursement. Everything physicians capture—and everything that can be coded—goes into the patient’s dashboard to impact the HCCs, which are now an important piece of the healthcare reimbursement puzzle.

Finally, Catrena Smith, CCS, CCS-P, CPCO, CPC, CIC, CPC-I, CRC, CHTS-PW, Coding Manager at KIWI-TEK, presented an informative session on the new coder’s roadmap to accuracy and compliance. She reiterated the need for compliance with coding guidelines and shared examples of whistleblower cases. In addition, Smith provided valuable pointers for newly employed clinical coders to consider:

  • Understand the important role that coders play in compliance
  • Know the fraud and abuse laws
  • Implement checks and balances to compare payer-driven code requirements to best-practice coding guidelines
  • Review the components of an effective compliance plan
  • Do not participate in fraudulent activities because coders and billers can be held civilly and/or criminally liable

Inspiration Found at the Beach and on the Dance Floor

Beyond the convention center, the educational sessions and the exhibit hall, I made time at this year’s AHIMA convention to enjoy the beach. Two power walks and a few meditation moments were the icing on my #AHIMACon18 cake this year. I intentionally found time to enjoy the warm sunshine and moonlit evening festivities including MRO’s signature event and AHIMA’s blanca party. Dressed in white, AHIMA attendees kicked up their heels to celebrate 90 years of convention fun—and think about AHIMA 2019 to be held September 14–19 in Chicago, Illinois. We’ll see you there!

About Beth Friedman
Beth Friedman is the founder and CEO of Agency Ten22, a healthcare IT marketing and public relations firm and proud sponsor of the Healthcare IT Marketing and PR Community. She started her career as a medical record coder and has been attending the AHIMA conference for over 20 years. Beth can be reached at beth@ten22pr.com.

HCCs: An Operational Perspective – HIM Scene

Posted on August 8, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Cathy Brownfield, MSHI, RHIA, CCS, Chief Operating Officer, TrustHCS.

Hierarchical Condition Categories (HCCs) were mandated by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) in 1997. In 2003 HCCs were selected as a risk adjustment model to be used to determine reimbursement for Medicare Advantage Plans.  They describe chronic condition diagnoses for patients and are determined from other codes assigned during physician encounters—including ICD-10 codes, CPT codes and medication codes.

The HCC framework is progressively being applied to numerous healthcare reimbursement reform initiatives. As the shift from volume to value advances, so does the importance of accurate HCC coding. This month’s blog explains the correlation between HCC coding and value- based reimbursement.

Two HCC models prevail

There are two HCC models in use by the federal government: CMS-HCC and HHS-HCC. Both models employ a risk adjustment score to predict future healthcare costs for plan enrollees. They operate within a hierarchical structure in which the more complex diagnoses absorb and incorporate less complex, chronic conditions.

The CMS-HCC model addresses a predominantly elderly population (65 years and over) and includes more than 9,000 ICD-10 codes that map to 79 HCC codes; these numbers do change and will increase slightly in FY 2019.

The Department of Health and Human Services (HSS) maintains the HHS-HCC model, which addresses commercial payer populations and covers all ages. This system incorporates CPT and medication codes and is currently comprised of 128 HCC codes.

Relationship to risk adjusted payment programs

The following are some of the risk adjusted payment programs currently using HCCs to determine reimbursement:

  • MA – Medicare Advantage Plan
  • MSSP – Medicare Shared Savings Program (ACO)
  • CPC+ – Comprehensive Primary Care Plus (Medical Home Model)
  • Commercial – Mainly the ACA

Each of the models primarily use ICD-10 codes taken from claims data to identify individuals with serious or chronic illnesses and assign a risk factor score to each enrollee based upon a combination of the individual’s health conditions and demographic details. Each HCC has a risk factor, an individual can have multiple HCC’s and those factors add up to their overall risk adjustment factor.

According to the CMS website, “risk adjustment allows CMS to pay plans for the risk of the beneficiaries they enroll, instead of an average amount for Medicare beneficiaries. By risk adjusting plan payments, CMS is able to make appropriate and accurate payments for enrollees with differences in expected costs. Risk adjustment is used to adjust bidding and payment based on the health status and demographic characteristics of an enrollee. Risk scores measure individual beneficiaries’ relative risk and risk scores are used to adjust payments for each beneficiary’s expected expenditures. By risk adjusting plan bids, CMS is able to use standardized bids as base payments to plans.”

How to operationalize accurate HCC coding

The risk-adjustment data for these programs is based on active diagnoses. In order to ensure the information is accurate, providers must conduct face-to-face encounters with their patients and all pertinent diagnoses must be documented in the medical record on an annual basis. Accurate documentation and coding is paramount to proper reimbursement under risk adjusted programs that use HCCs.  Beyond accurate HCC coding, it is important for HIM professionals to be aware of CMS reporting and data collection methodologies when operationalizing HCCs.

Reporting considerations to know

In 2012, CMS began transitioning the Medicare Advantage Organizations (MAOs) data collection method from its original format to an Encounter Data Payment System (EDS). The data collected under the EDS is unfiltered and more detailed than EDS’s predecessor, Risk Adjustment Payment System (RAPS). While CMS has gone back and forth on which algorithm to use, a blend of 85 percent RAPS and 15 percent EDS scores is currently in place for 2018.

Data is submitted directly to CMS where filtering logic is applied to extract the valid diagnosis codes from the data. The codes are then used in the risk score calculation process. With this process, MAOs must verify the completeness and accuracy of the data submitted to CMS to ensure that all appropriate diagnosis codes have been accepted for risk adjustment by CMS.

The RAPS/EDS blend will return to a 75/25 split in 2019. Additionally, CMS is proposing to calculate the EDS risk scores amended with RAPS inpatient diagnoses. Other 2019 changes are listed below.

2019 CMS-HCC Model Changes

  • Behavioral Health Conditions
    • HCC 55 Drug/Alcohol Dependence: Add opioid (and other substances) overdose ICD-10 diagnosis codes to HCC 55
    • Add HCC 56 Drug Abuse, Uncomplicated, Excluding Cannabis, includes opioid dependence diagnoses (among other narcotics)
  • Mental Health and Substance Abuse Disorders
    • Add HCC 59 Reactive and Unspecified Psychosis
    • Add HCC 60 Personality Disorders
  • Add HCC 138, Chronic Kidney Disease Stage 3 (Moderate Only)

Role of HIM and where to learn more about HCCs

In the new frontier of value-based payment, HIM is the purveyor of accurate coding and HCC assignment for organizations and providers. Savvy HIM leaders ensure they have the most up-to-date information by monitoring the following websites and information sources:

About Cathy Brownfield
Cathy Brownfield is the Chief Operating Officer of TrustHCS. She holds over 17 years of operations, auditing and coding experience. Prior to TrustHCS, Cathy served as the Operations Director for HealthPort’s Coding Operations division overseeing scheduling, billing, and quality assurance efforts.

Cathy holds her Master of Science in Health Informatics from Arkansas Tech University. She received her Bachelor of Science in Health Information Management from the same university. Cathy is a Registered Health Information Administrator and a Certified Coding Specialist. As a member of the American Health Information Management Association she volunteers on the Coding Community Council and also the PPE work group.