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Healthcare Interoperability is Solved … But What Does That Really Mean? – #HITExpo Insights

Posted on June 12, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of the best parts of the new community we created at the Health IT Expo conference is the way attendees at the conference and those in the broader healthcare IT community engage on Twitter using the #HITExpo hashtag before, during, and after the event.  It’s a treasure trove of insights, ideas, practical innovations, and amazing people.  Don’t forget that last part since social media platforms are great at connecting people even if they are usually in the news for other reasons.

A great example of some great knowledge sharing that happened on the #HITExpo hashtag came from Don Lee (@dflee30) who runs #HCBiz, a long time podcast which he recorded live from Health IT Expo.  After the event, Don offered his thoughts on what he thought was the most important conversation about “Solving Interoperability” that came from the conference.  You can read his thoughts on Twitter or we’ve compiled all 23 tweets for easy reading below (A Big Thanks to Thread Reader for making this easy).

As shared by Don Lee:

1/ Finally working through all my notes from the #HITExpo. The most important conversation to me was the one about “solving interoperability” with @RasuShrestha@PaulMBlack and @techguy.

2/ Rasu told the story of what UPMC accomplished using DBMotion. How it enabled the flow of data amongst the many hospitals, clinics and docs in their very large system. #hitexpo

3/ John challenged him a bit and said: it sounds like you’re saying that you’ve solved #interoperability. Is that what you’re telling us? #hitexpo

4/ Rasu explained in more detail that they had done the hard work of establishing syntactic interop amongst the various systems they dealt with (I.e. they can physically move the data from one system to another and put it in a proper place). #hitexpo

5/ He went on and explained how they had then done the hard work of establishing semantic interoperability amongst the many systems they deal with. That means now all the data could be moved, put in its proper place, AND they knew what it meant. #hitexpo

6/ Syntactic interop isn’t very useful in and of itself. You have data but it’s not mastered and not yet useable in analytics. #hitexpo

7/ Semantic interop is the mastering of the data in such a way that you are confident you can use it in analytics, ML, AI, etc. Now you can, say, find the most recent BP for a patient pop regardless of which EMR in your system it originated. And have confidence in it. #hitexpo

8/ Semantic interop is closely related to the concept of #DataFidelity that @BigDataCXO talks about. It’s the quality of data for a purpose. And it’s very hard work. #hitexpo

9/ In the end, @RasuShrestha’s answer was that UPMC had done all of that hard work and therefore had made huge strides in solving interop within their system. He said “I’m not flying the mission accomplished banner just yet”. #hitexpo

10/ Then @PaulMBlack – CEO at @Allscripts – said that @RasuShrestha was being modest and that they had in fact “Solved interoperability.”

I think he’s right and that’s what this tweet storm is about. Coincidentally, it’s a matter of semantics. #hitexpo

11/ I think Rasu dialed it back a bit because he knew that people would hear that and think it means something different. #hitexpo

12/ The overall industry conversation tends to be about ubiquitous, semantic interop where all data is available everywhere and everyone knows what it means. I believe Rasu was saying that they hadn’t achieved that. And that makes sense… because it’s impossible. #hitexpo

13/ @GraceCordovano asked the perfect question and I wish there had been a whole session dedicated to answering it: (paraphrasing) What’s the difference between your institutional definition of interop and what the patients are talking about? #hitexpo

14/ The answer to that question is the crux of our issue. The thing patients want and need is for everyone who cares for them to be on the same page. Interop is very relevant to that issue, obviously, but there’s a lot of friction and it goes way beyond tech. #hitexpo

15/ Also, despite common misconception, no other industry has solved this either. Sure, my credit card works in Europe and Asia and gets back to my bank in the US, but that’s just a use case. There is no ubiquitous semantic interop between JP Morgan Chase and HSBC.

16/ There are lots of use cases that work in healthcare too. E-Prescribing, claims processing and all the related HIPAA transactions, etc. #hitexpo

17/ Also worth noting… Canada has single payer system and they also don’t have clinical interoperability.

This is not a problem unique to healthcare nor the US. #hitexpo

18/ So healthcare needs to pick its use cases and do the hard work. That’s what Rasu described on stage. That’s what Paul was saying has been accomplished. They are both right. And you can do it too. #hitexpo

19/ So good news: #interoperability is solved in #healthcare.

Bad news: It’s a ton of work and everyone needs to do it.

More bad news: You have to keep doing it forever (it breaks, new partners, new sources, new data to care about, etc). #hitexpo

19/ Some day there will be patient mediated exchange that solves the patient side of the problem and does it in a way that works for everyone. Maybe on a #blockchain. Maybe something else. But it’s 10+ years away. #hitexpo

20/ In the meantime my recommendation to clinical orgs – support your regional #HIE. Even UPMC’s very good solution only works for data sources they know about. Your patients are getting care outside your system and in a growing # of clinical and community based settings. #hitexpo

21/ the regional #HIE is the only near-term solution that even remotely resembles semantic, ubiquitous #interoperability in #healthcare.
#hitexpo

22/ My recommendation to patients: You have to take matters into your own hands for now. Use consumer tools like Apple health records and even Dropbox like @ShahidNShah suggested in another #hitexpo session. Also, tell your clinicians to support and use the regional #HIE.

23/ So that got long. I’ll end it here. What do you think?

P.S. the #hitexpo was very good. You should check it out in 2019.

A big thank you to Don Lee for sharing these perspectives and diving in much deeper than we can do in 45 minutes on stage. This is what makes the Health IT Expo community special. People with deep understanding of a problem fleshing out the realities of the problem so we can better understand how to address them. Plus, the sharing happens year round as opposed to just at a few days at the conference.

Speaking of which, what do you think of Don’s thoughts above? Is he right? Is there something he’s missing? Is there more depth to this conversation that we need to understand? Share your thoughts, ideas, insights, and perspectives in the comments or on social media using the #HITExpo hashtag.

5 Ways Allscripts Will Help Fight Opioid Abuse In 2018

Posted on May 22, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Paul Black, CEO of Allscripts, a proud sponsor of Health IT Expo.

Prescription opioid misuse and overdoses are on the rise. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that more than 40 Americans die every day from prescription opioid overdose. It also estimates that the economic impact in the United States is $78.5 billion a year, including the costs of healthcare, lost productivity, addiction treatment and criminal justice involvement.

The opioid crisis has taken a devastating toll on our communities, families and loved ones. It is a complex problem that will require a lot of hard work from stakeholders across the healthcare continuum.

We all have a part to play. At Allscripts, we feel it is our responsibility to continuously improve our solutions to help providers address public health concerns. Our mission is to design technology that enables smarter care, delivered with greater precision, for better outcomes.

Here are five ways Allscripts plans to help clinicians combat the opioid crisis in 2018:

1) Establish a baseline. Does your patient population have a problem with opioids?

Before healthcare organizations can start addressing opioid abuse, they need to understand how the crisis is affecting their patient population. We are all familiar with the national statistics, but how does the crisis manifest in each community? What are the specific prescribing practices or overdose patterns that need the most attention?

Now that healthcare is on a fully digital platform, we can gain insights from the data. Organizations can more precisely manage the needs of each patient population. We are working with clients to uncover some of these patterns. For example, one client is using Sunrise™ Clinical Performance Manager (CPM) reports to more closely examine opioid prescribing patterns in emergency rooms.

2) Secure the prescribing process. Is your prescribing process safe and secure?

Electronic prescribing of controlled substances (EPCS) can help reduce fraud. Unfortunately, even though the technology is widely available, it is not widely adopted. Areas where clinicians regularly use EPCS have seen significantly less prescription fraud and abuse.

EPCS functionality is already in place across our EHRs. While more than 90% of all pharmacies are EPCS-enabled, only 14% of controlled substances are prescribed electronically. We’re making EPCS adoption one of our top priorities at Allscripts, and we continue to discuss the benefits with policymakers.

3) Provide clinical decision support. Are you current with evidence-based best practices?

We are actively pursuing partnerships with health plans, pharmaceutical companies and third-party content providers to collaborate on evidence-based prescribing guidelines. These guidelines may suggest quantity limits, recommendations for fast-acting versus extended-release medications, protocols for additional and alternative therapies, and expanded educational material and content.

We’ll use the clinical decision support technologies we already have in place to present these assessment tools and guidelines at the time needed within clinical workflows. Our goal is to provide the information to providers at the right time, so that they can engage in productive conversations with patients, make informed decisions and create optimal treatment plans.

4) Simplify access to Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs (PDMPs). Are you avoiding prescribing because it’s too hard to check PDMPs?

PDMPs are state-level databases that collect, monitor and analyze e-prescribing data from pharmacies and prescribers. The CDC Guidelines recommend clinicians should review the patient’s history of controlled substance prescriptions by checking PDMPs.

PDMPs, however, are not a unified source of information, which can make it challenging for providers to check them at the point of care. The College of Healthcare Information Management Executives (CHIME) has called for better EHR-PDMP integration, combined with data-driven reports to identify physician prescribing patterns.

In 2018, we’re working on integrating the PDMP into the clinician’s workflow for every patient. The EHR will take PDMP data and provide real-time alert scores that can make it easier to discern problems at the point of care.

5) Predict risk. Can big data help you predict risk for addiction?

Allscripts has a team of data scientists dedicated to transforming data into information and actionable insights. These analysts combine vast amounts of information from within the EHR, our Clinical Data Warehouse – data that represents millions of patients – and public health mechanisms (such as PDMPs).

We use this “data lake” to develop algorithms to identify at-risk patients and reveal prescription patterns that most often lead to abuse, overdose and death. Our research on this is nascent, and early insights are compelling.

The opioid epidemic cannot be solved overnight, nor is it something any of us can address alone. But we are enthusiastic about the teamwork and efforts of our entire industry to address this complex, multi-faceted epidemic.

Hear Paul Black discuss the future of health IT beyond the EHR at this year’s HIT Expo.

Investors Want Allscripts CEO Axed

Posted on May 24, 2012 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

Not long ago, Allscripts  management went through a dramatic shakeup, with the firing of one board member, the loss of three others and the departure of the company’s CFO.  (It’s rumored that Allscripts’ chief marketing officer is headed for the door soon, as well.)

The Street didn’t react well to these boardroom shenanigans. The company’s stock plunged 40 percent in the wake of these changes, and the stock’s reputation was trashed, with several ratings falling from “buy” to “neutral.”

CEO Glen Tullman survived that round of bloodshed, but it seems he’s still at risk for losing his job.  Healthcor Management, LP, which owns 5.5 percent of Allscripts shares, has filed a suit against the company which demands that Tullman resign.

Healthcor has filed a lawsuit against Allscripts, ostensibly over its process for selecting board members, designed to give it more control of the company. Among other things, it demands that Tullman be removed as CEO.

Healthcor is alleging that Tullman has failed to execute well as CEO, leading to poor financial performance of late. It’s also challenging Tullman’s $7.2 million compensation in 2011, arguing that he made more money than CEOs of comparable companies that

What’s more, the chairman and key board members have left the company were the last ones who could oversee Eclypsis products that came on board when Allscripts acquired it. Definitely not cool. I have to say that if these were the last Eclypsis leaders on the board, I would have busted my tail to try and keep them, not dumped the chairman just like that.

On top of all that, Healthcor isn’t fond of the new director picks, including former Cerner COO Paul Black and Robert Cindrith, formerly chief legal office and senior vice president at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Healthcor is demanding that it have the right to submit its own candidates.

It’s worth noting, however, that Healthcor doesn’t seem to be in a rush to dump its stock. Why?  Because before it filed suit, Healthcor asked Allscripts to consider any and all moves which might make everyone involved whole, including a sales of the business.  Interesting stuff, if your head isn’t on the block.

Bottom line, my guess is that Tullman will be able to stay in place if he does something dramatic to fix things and reassure investors that they’ll get their profits. Whether that will involve a sale is yet to be seen.