Free Hospital EMR and EHR Newsletter Want to receive the latest news on EMR, Meaningful Use, ARRA and Healthcare IT sent straight to your email? Join thousands of healthcare pros who subscribe to Hospital EMR and EHR for FREE!

PESummit Day 2 – Being Vulnerable Opens Us to Deeper Connections

Posted on June 19, 2018 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

Whether it was planned or by cosmic happenstance, Day 2 of the 2018 Patient Experience: Empathy and Innovation Summit (#PESummit) reinforced a theme from the prior day:

  • Making yourself vulnerable opens us up to deeper connections with others

On Day 1, Cleveland Clinic President and CEO, Tomislav Mihaljevic MD @TomMihaljevicMD shared a story of a patient that died in the OR (see my Day 1 summary for details). It was a very personal story. By sharing it Mihaljevic made himself vulnerable and instantly forged a connection with the thousands of attendees in the hall.

Most people find it difficult to share stories that make them uncomfortable – especially ones where we are at the center of the story. We don’t like to talk about our fears, our failures or our losses because we are afraid of what other people may think (which is another way of saying that we fear that we will be rejected). Yet paradoxically by making ourselves vulnerable in this way, we actually make it easier for others to connect with us. Adrienne Boissy @boissyad, Chief Experience Officer at Cleveland Clinic stated exactly that after Mihalijevic shared his story.

Day 2’s opening keynote speaker, Kelsey Crowe PhD, founder of Help Each Other Out, articulated how the fear of being a burden or being seen as needy, holds patients back from asking for help. In other words, its hard for patients to admit to being vulnerable:

Crowe went on to share how small gestures of kindness and empathy, made at the times of vulnerability made a tremendous difference in their care. A unique “gesture wall” that she deployed at a healthcare facility allowed patients to capture these wonderful moments for staff to read.

This theme of being open, honest and vulnerable as a way to connect with people was reinforced by the next keynote speaker, Michael Hebb, founder of Deathoverdinner.org, and Drugsoverdinner.org.

In fact, Hebb’s entire keynote featured story after story about how sharing the fears about the end-of-life opened up the conversation, providing families and loved ones with the chance to better connect.

Vulnerability was also featured by Day 2’s closing keynotes: Brennan Spiegel MD @BrennanSpiegel, Director of Health Services Research, Cedars-Sinai Health System and Zubin Damania MD @ZDoggMD

At the end of Brennan’s fascinating presentation on the clinical application for an efficacy of Virtual Reality, he shared a failure that counterbalanced the exceedingly positive stories that he had showed the audience. Like Mihaljevic, talking about a failure helped the audience connect with Brennan and the patient that had suffered a panic attack as a result of the VR simulation.

Vulnerability was also featured by Day 2’s closing keynotes: Brennan Spiegel MD @BrennanSpiegel, Director of Health Services Research, Cedars-Sinai Health System and Zubin Damania MD @ZDoggMD

At the end of Brennan’s fascinating presentation on the clinical application for an efficacy of Virtual Reality, he shared a failure that counterbalanced the exceedingly positive stories that he had showed the audience. Like Mihaljevic, talking about a failure helped the audience connect with Brennan and the patient that had suffered a panic attack as a result of the VR simulation.

As is normal for Damania (aka ZDoggMD), his session was energizing and entertaining. However, in the midst of live renditions of his favorite medical rap parodies and fun stories of his parents, Damania shared the story of Turntable Health – the novel practice he was forced to close in early 2017. “No one was more pissed off about it than me.” said Damania.

By sharing this painful part of his journey, Damania made himself vulnerable and judging by the body language, many in the audience could relate to his do-everything-right-yet-still-not-work-out feelings. That story gave context to Damania’s impassioned plee to join him in ushering in Health 3.0 – a vision for care partly based on the best parts of his Turntable Health experience.

Day 2 of PESummit even better than Day 1. I can’t wait for the final day tomorrow. Follow the conference hashtag – #PESummit for real-time updates!

PESummit Day 1 – Empathy is Hot in Cleveland

Posted on I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

With the mercury hitting an incredible 90+ in downtown Cleveland, it was only fitting that the speakers and attendees at the 2018 Patient Experience: Empathy and Innovation Summit (#PESummit) turned up the heat on the passion for more empathy in healthcare WITHOUT a corresponding increase in burnout.

Day 1 at PESummit kicked off with Cleveland Clinic’s dynamic duo of Adrienne Boissy @boissyad, Chief Experience Officer and K. Kelly Hancock @kkellyhancock, Executive Chief Nursing Officer. Boissy issued a challenge to the audience in her opening:

They were followed by Cleveland Clinic President and CEO, Tomislav Mihaljevic MD @TomMihaljevicMD who shared a number of things that we could each do to increase empathy in our daily work. The clear favorite was eating lunch with someone you don’t know, and get to know them:


But the most poignant part of Mihaljevic’s time on stage came when he shared a failure from his past – the time he lost a patient in the OR. He spoke about how he and his team was unable to repair the damage to a patient’s heart and how devastated the team was when despite their best effort, the patient died. As the leader Mihaljevic held himself accountable and not only did he have to support the patient’s family in dealing with their loss, he had to help his own team deal with the death as well.

It was a pleasant surprise to hear Mihaljevic talk about the feelings he had in the moment and how he learned lessons that he carries with him today.

The highlight of the breakout sessions was the panel discussion on “When Patient and Healthcare Innovation Meet” that featured Grace Cordovano @GraceCordovano, Julie Rish @julie_rish, Christine Traul MD @traulc and Michael Seres @mjseres.


My favorite was Cordovano’s tip for patients to go into the doctor appointments PREPARED – with questions they are seeking answers to.

Day 1 ended with Thomas H Lee MD @ThomasHLeeMD, CMO of Press Ganey talking about “grit” (aka resilience) at the individual and team levels.


Lee’s most provocative statement was when he cited his research that found that it is ineffective to use financial incentives to motivate behavior that is inherently non-financial in nature. This punched a hole through the concept of paying people to sleep more than 7 hours that was mentioned by one of the morning keynotes and other gamification techniques that have become popular over the past few years.

Day 1 at PESummit was fantastic and I’m looking forward to a equally great Day 2. Follow along on Twitter #PESummit

 

 

 

 

Origin Story: Mark McCloskey, President of Oneview Healthcare. Living Up to Commitments.

Posted on May 29, 2018 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

Right from the start I knew Mark McCloskey’s origin story was going to be special.

McCloskey, President and Founder of Oneview Healthcare, agreed to meet while we were both traveling through Chicago. We booked the meeting well in advance, but it turned out that we accidentally picked a date when Oneview was hosting several key customers at its US headquarters in Chicago. It would have been completely understandable if McCloskey postponed our meeting, but he and his team insisted keep it on the books. They had made a commitment and they wanted to make good on it.

Making commitments and living up to them is something that permeates McCloskey’s origin story and makes it special. In fact, this commitment is something that McCloskey has infused into the company he founded. Oneview has a strong reputation as a company that listens to its customers and delivers on promises made. This is partly why their customers are such strong advocates.

McCloskey’s story begins as many Irish tales do, as a young man leaving his beloved home to seek his fortune abroad. In McCloskey’s case, his journey began with a commitment made to a dress-maker friend of his. He took five dresses designed by his friend with a promise to sell them in London. Armed with nothing more than determination to succeed, he sold those dresses to a local London fashion retailer, Next PLC and convinced them to let him have space in one of their stores in return for a percentage of his dress sales.

With no experience in either fashion or retail, McCloskey focused on listening to what customers wanted and then tried it. Eventually he found a winning formula and in short order, he grew the business from one location to several dozen. He hired staff, took care of marketing and worked with his dressmaker friend to ensure a steady supply of dresses for the sprawling retail operation. By the tender age of 22, he had 84 people working for him and he was selling dresses all over England.

Unfortunately, it all came to abrupt end in 1988 when his dressmaker friend decided to retire from the business in order to start a family. McCloskey wound down the operation and returned to Ireland.

Back at home, McCloskey became a successful sales executive at a telecommunications company that was later acquired by British Telecom. He then went on to co-found a company that ran Ireland’s first independent ATM networks because he thought people should be able to conveniently access their own money from any ATM. That company was acquired by Ulster Bank in 2004. Two years after that acquisition, McCloskey found himself in hospital for knee surgery and it was his experience that ignited the flame that would become Oneview Healthcare.

“They put me in a ward room after my surgery,” recalled McCloskey. “The room held 4 people in total and had just 1 TV. The biggest guy in the room had the remote so no one was going to argue with him about what to watch. So for three days I watched what he wanted to watch.”

During those three days, McCloskey began to take note of the odd and inefficient processes at the hospital. “I noticed that everything was paper based,” recounted McCloskey. “Whenever a nurse or doctor came in the room, they asked the same questions over and over. It became very repetitive. On top of that, I got woken up every morning at 6am when a lady from food services came in the room to hand us slips of paper with that day’s menu on it. We had to check what we wanted for breakfast, lunch and dinner and then the lady would collect all the papers. I would come back after physio and the lunch that I ordered would be on the tray and it would be cold because it had been sitting there for an hour. They hospital delivered the meals according to the kitchen’s schedule and not the patient’s schedule. Then after almost 4 days in the hospital, they gave me an A4 sheet of paper with some instructions on it and said ‘there’s your physio’ now off you go.”

Following his hospital stay, McCloskey found himself on a plane to New York City with his wife. With the less-than-stellar healthcare experience still fresh in his mind, McCloskey was pleasantly surprised by much better experience he had as an airline passenger – especially with the in-flight entertainment system. [Editor’s Note: It is never a good sign when the customer experience in the AIRLINE industry is superior to your own].

During that trip, McCloskey committed himself to bringing that same airline experience to healthcare and Oneview Healthcare was born.

It was here that his early experience selling dresses helped him. Once again, McCloskey found himself in an unfamiliar industry (healthcare) attempting to sell a product he knew very little about (patient entertainment systems). Taking a cue from his past, he started by finding out what customers actually wanted and then incorporating that into his offering.

One of the first organizations he showed the product to was Epworth HealthCare, the largest private hospital group operator in Australia’s state of Victoria. They were impressed, but had numerous suggestions to improve the product which the small Oneview team added to the product. This virtuous cycle repeated itself over and over as McCloskey continued to show the product to healthcare organizations around the world including: UCSF Mission Bay, Chris O’Brian Lifehouse and  Maimonides Medical Center.

Fast forward to the end of 2012. At this point Oneview was a company of eight and without any customers, McCloskey had to make a tough decision. The company needed an infusion of cash in order to ensure it could make the Christmas payroll. McCloskey went to his wife and explained the situation. Together they decided to sell both their cars and put the money in the company. His wife had just one condition – that when the company “made it” that she would get the car of her dreams. McCloskey agreed and the cars were sold quickly.

And then the call came.

Alan Kincade, CEO of Epworth HealthCare called McCloskey to ask him to come to Australia to make a last presentation to the selection committee who was looking at new patient entertainment systems. McCloskey flew down to Australia and met with the Epworth team. The product’s vastly improved feature set, which went well beyond a simple entertainment system, impressed the committee. After the presentation, Kincade asked to meet privately with McCloskey.

“At that meeting Alan told me that we had the best product he’d ever seen,” said McCloskey. “But before we could move forward, he wanted me to answer a few questions from their financial controller. At that point he invited Liz into the room and she asked me three questions which I answered as honestly as I could.”

“How many employees do you have?”

“Eight”

“What’s your revenue?”

“Our revenue is zero right now.”

“What’s your balance sheet look like?”

“Not that good actually. Right now we’re $5 Million in debt.”

According to McCloskey it was at that point that the controller turned to Kincade and said: “Honestly Alan you can’t sign a contract with a company from Ireland with eight people who are 5 million in debt.”

OOF.

But just when all hope seemed lost, Kincade said the magic words that would set Oneview on a path to success: “Mark, can you sort out your debt problem? If you can get back to me in 6 months and prove to me that you have the money and the balance sheet sorted out so that I can sign a contract for 5 years, I’ll do business with you.”

McCloskey committed to Kincade that he would.

The meeting happened on a Wednesday and by Friday McCloskey was home in Ireland getting ready with his wife for a dinner party with some friends. By cosmic coincidence, one of the other guests at the dinner party just happened to be a financier from Australia who helped companies raise capital. Over dinner, the two of them agreed to meet at the Oneview office on Monday.

During that meeting, McCloskey and his team impressed the financier who agreed to help Oneview raise money and restructure its debt. That financier was James Fitter, who is now Oneview’s Chief Executive Officer.

Together McCloskey and Fitter raised $8 Million from family, friends and angel investors. They bought back the company’s debt from the bank and in a few short months they got the balance sheet in order. A week after they completed the financing, the company inked its first deal – from Chris O’Brian Lifehouse in Australia. A week later, UCSF called to negotiate a deal.

“Joe Bengfort, CIO of UCSF Medical Center called me up and told me ‘You have a great product and you are one of two finalists’,” said McCloskey. “He then told us that the other company was installed in 40,000 beds compared to the zero that we had. Despite that, he let us know that we had won the contract because ‘UCSF has not gotten to where it is without making brave and bold decisions’”

To secure the deal, McCloskey had to make several commitments including: handing over Board of Director notes to Bengfort so that he could read about the technical direction and financial health of the company (something that Fitter had implemented as standard company practice earlier in the year) and to allowing a member of the UCSF team serve on the new customer advisory board for the Oneview product (which they did).

With these two new customers in the fold and having met the conditions outlined by Kincade at their last meeting, McCloskey returned to Epworth and signed the deal. In just a few months Oneview went from zero revenue to having three large hospital clients. It was just the boost the company needed.

Today, Oneview is a successful company with offices in Dublin (Global HQ), Chicago, Dubai, Melbourne and Sydney. The company recently announced a further global expansion with customers in Thailand and the rest of UAE.

As McCloskey told his story, I was struck by the number of times he was asked to make a commitment and was impressed by his effort to make good on those commitments. Whether it was a promise to sell a certain number of dresses, to address the company finances or to buy a car of his wife’s dreams, McCloskey never waivered in his commitment.

In this day and age, it is easy to make a verbal promise and even easier to break it. Verbal agreements simply do not have the heft they once did. To me it is rare and special to you hear a story like McCloskey’s – of promises made and kept.

Over this past year I have gotten to know a few members of the Oneview team and I can tell you firsthand that the company has a culture of living up to commitments. When they say they will do something, they do it. It’s not hard to trace this culture back to McCloskey. It is one of the reasons why the company is succeeding.

EPILOGUE: McCloskey did buy his wife the car of her dreams. He never did get around to replacing his vehicle and now uses Uber instead.

10 Useful Resources Shared at HMPS18

Posted on May 15, 2018 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

I recently had the opportunity to attend Healthcare Marketing & Physician Strategies Summit (#HMPS18) in Salt Lake City. This was my second time attending the conference and it was just as exciting and educational as my first experience

Consumerism and improving the patient experience dominated the conference with many sessions and exhibit booths dedicated to strategies, tactics and technologies that were designed to address the challenge of rising patient expectations. Many familiar names were exhibitors including: Lionshare, Stericycle Communication Solutions, Influence Health, ReviveHealth, MERGE Atlanta, Healthgrades, Tea Leaves, True North Custom, Evariant, and Hailey Sault.

There have already been some great summaries written about the conference. Most notably from:

Rather than write another summary I thought I would share some of the amazing resources that were shared during the conference – resources that I believe anyone in Healthcare that is involved in marketing or patient experience would find helpful.

One of the best resources was from Shawn Gross of White Rhino. In his session Shawn walked us through a “Micro-Moments of Patient Trust” journey map. This is about as succinct a map as you’ll find that captures the essential elements of a typical interaction with a non-chronic patient.

Amy Jose from Spectrum Healthcare Partners captured this enlightening chart from Cleveland Clinic that shows what social media channels they post to during the day. It wasn’t surprising to see that Facebook and Twitter dominate the chart, but what was a bit shocking was the frequency. Kudos to the Cleveland Clinic team for developing enough content to drive this level of social interaction.

One of the undertones of HMPS18 was that the role of Healthcare Marketers is changing. Instead of being just a master of traditional marketing tactics, leaders will be expected to be master scientists as well. The Marketer Scientist will need to mix data analysis, systems thinking and technology prowess along with storytelling, branding and leading change.

This slide captured by Meghan Lugo from Jennings is a great reminder to anyone in sale or marketing. My favorite is #5 – focus on helping not selling. When you help someone, you create a real connection. Connection leads to trusted relationships and relationships are the foundation for any sale. True for Health IT software and equally true for healthcare services.

While at the conference I had the opportunity to be one of three audience members for a podcast recording hosted by Reed Smith and Chris Boyer. Interesting insights on Facebook and healthcare’s new “digital front door” were shared by the podcast panelists: @dandunlop @tmoore634RN @AndrewDRainey and JK Loyd

Need help convincing senior management that you need to invest in service recovery? Check out these amazing comments from HCA patients that revised poor online reviews after the hospital made sincere efforts to make it right.

Linda McCracken shared a sobering slide about how much consumer experiences are influencing patient expectations – and rightfully so. I was surprised at how 45% of people will not travel more than 10 miles for routine care. Can anyone say tele-consults?

Another great share from Amy Jose, this time a slide full of stats on patient and consumer digital health usage.

One of the best sessions I attended at HMPS18 was this one with Renown Health CEO Tony Slonim MD @RenownCEOTonyMD and Chief Marketing Officer, Suzanne Hendrey @healthmktr. It was full of great tips and suggestions on how senior executives can engage with patient and the community in an authentic way that also helps drive towards the goals of the organization. Thankfully for those that couldn’t be there Dan Dunlop Periscoped the entire session.

Finally, there’s this video shared by Paul Griffiths friend and CEO of MedTouch. It’s not a resource per se, but it is a touching video that tells his personal story and what’s driving him to improve healthcare.

 

PX2018: The Line Between Patient Experience and Patient Engagement Continues to Blur

Posted on May 4, 2018 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

The 2018 Patient Experience Conference, #PX2018, hosted by The Beryl Institute, was a wholly different than previous incarnations. In prior years the central focus was squarely on patient experience. This year, there was significant emphasis placed on patient engagement and activating patients. It was a welcome change.

The Beryl Institute’s annual conference is one of the events I look forward to each year. It is a positive, upbeat, and reaffirming event that brings together healthcare professionals involved with improving patient experience. Attendees come from around the world including: Canada, UK, Sweden and Asia. This gives the event an international flavor and brings together many different perspectives on patient experience.

In 2004, I attended my first patient experience conference. Back then the event was organized and hosted by the Society of Healthcare Consumer Advocacy (SHCA) – a society within the American Hospital Association. In those days, the annual gathering was designed specifically for Patient Feedback professionals and Patient Advocates that worked inside hospitals. The event, was dominated by sessions about patient surveys (later becoming HCAHPS) and timely responses to patient complaints. For many years the annual SHCA event remained operationally focused.

In 2013, SHCA was integrated into The Beryl Institute and things began to shift markedly. Instead of an annual SHCA conference that was narrowly aimed at patient complaints, the new conference from The Beryl Institute was much broader and covered the whole of patient experience. The sessions became less operational and more strategic in nature. Words like “empathy” and phrases like “meeting patients where they are” became part of the hallway chatter.

Fast forward to 2018. “Patient Experience” has become an even broader term and perhaps slightly overused. All sorts of HealthIT companies and consulting firms now boldly state they are in the patient experience business. The term is now used to refer to everything from patient advocacy to patient rights to online reviews (and reputation management) to patient engagement/activation. As the definition has changed, so too has The Beryl Institute conference.

The first hint that something was different came when I scanned the program agenda a few weeks before the conference. There were several sessions that I did not expect to see:

  • Engaging Families and Teams in I-PASS to Improve Patient Safety and Experience
  • OpenNotes: Breaking Barriers, Changing Culture, Engaging Patients
  • Building Operational Capacity for Patient Engagement

I was also pleasantly surprised by the depth and breadth of vendors in the exhibit hall. Companies like OneView, TVR Communications, Relatient and eVariant each had demonstrations of products that educated patients, reminded patients about their care plans and directed patients to the most appropriate service line or physician based on an analysis of their needs. All of these capabilities are focused in the world of patient engagement yet judging by the busy traffic at these booths, it is clear that patient experience professionals are stakeholders and influencers for the purchase of those solutions.

Even consulting companies like Cast & Hue (who did a fun design-thinking exercise in their booth) talked about how they can help healthcare organizations build better processes and workflows to encourage more patient involvement.

I welcome the blurring between patient experience and patient engagement. Although it is possible to be good at one without the other, the goal should be to improve one alongside the other. To me, patient engagement is tangible and measurable – something which was becoming increasingly difficult to do in the world of patient experience pre-2010. I believe a good patient experience is a prerequisite to engaging patients in their care which leads to better outcomes – which is ultimately the goal we are all striving for.

Small Financial Innovations that Make A Big Difference for Patients and Hospitals

Posted on May 3, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

More and more these days I’m fascinated by the practical innovations that can impact healthcare much more than the moonshot ideas which are great ideas but never actually impact healthcare. I’ve quickly come to believe that the way to transform healthcare his through hundreds of little innovations that will allow us to reach a transformative future.

I saw an example of this when I talked with PatientMatters. They work in a section of healthcare that many don’t consider sexy: revenue cycle management. However, I often say, the financial side of healthcare isn’t sexy, unless you care about money. Given how healthcare is getting pressed from every angle, every hospital I know is interested in the financial side of the equation.

PatientMatters is doing a number of things that are interesting when it comes to a patient’s financial experience in a hospital. They offer a great mix of tools, training, process design, automation and coaching to reframe a patient’s financial experience. This is a trend I’m seeing in more and more healthcare IT companies. It takes much more than technology to really change the experience.

That said, I was most intrigued by how PatientMatters offers unique payment plans to patients based on a wide variety of factors including current credit information, payment history for current financial obligations, and their residual income. From this information PatientMatters does an assessment of a patient’s ability to pay based on these five categories:

  1. Guarantors that generate this designation are the most likely to pay their full obligation. This population predictably pays their full balance more than 94% of the time. Recognizing these guarantors provides key savings to the hospital:
    • Because these guarantors are most likely to meet their obligation, conversations with the registration staff regarding payment are brief and concise.
    • Recognizing the high likelihood of guarantor payment performance, many hospitals elect to keep these accounts in-house and not refer to their early out vendors. This generates vendor savings for the hospital.
  1. These guarantors also have a high collections success rate, but they may need more time and slightly reduced payment plans to meet their obligation. Using data analytics to understand the guarantor allows the hospital to structure a custom payment plan with a high likelihood of performance.
  1. Guarantors in this category require a higher degree of attention from the registration team. This group struggles to meet their financial responsibilities. A hospital that spends the extra time working with the guarantor on a highly structured payment plan will see collection improvements with this population.
  1. These guarantors fall into two categories; a) a low likelihood of meeting their financial commitment or b) guarantor may meet hospital charity program, based on their FPL status. Scripting will help the registration assess the guarantor and identify the best solution.
  1. These guarantors will likely be unable to meet their hospital obligation. Many times these individuals will qualify for the hospital charity, Medicaid, County Indigent or other assistance programs.

It’s not hard to see how this more personalized approach to a patient’s financial experience makes a big difference when it comes to collections, patient satisfaction, etc. However, what I loved most about this approach was how simple it was to understand and process. It’s worth remembering that a hospital’s registration staff are generally one of the lowest paid, highest turnover positions in any hospital. So, simplicity is key.

I love seeing practical, innovative solutions like the one PatientMatters offers hospitals. They make a big difference on a hospital’s bottom line. However, they also create a much better experience for the patients who mostly want to get through the billing process and on to their care. How are you customizing the financial experience for your patients?

Healthcare Execs See New Digital Health Technologies As Critical To Success

Posted on October 30, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

Healthcare organizations have spent massively on HIT in recent years, in hopes of preparing for success by building next-generation tech infrastructure.  If a new survey is any indication, while the current set of efforts haven’t born as much fruit as their leaders like, they remain hopeful that the next wave will better support their goals.

The SAP Digital Transformation Executive Study, which surveyed about 400 healthcare executives, looked at whether the healthcare industry was prepared for the digital economy.

Respondents told SAP (and survey partner Oxford Economics) that the existing technology investments weren’t delivering the value they wanted, with only 22% saying they supported customer satisfaction efforts and 23% saying that they helped foster innovation.

Fortunately for health IT vendors, however, that wasn’t the whole story. Perhaps because hope springs eternal, healthcare leaders predicted that in two years thing should look different.

In fact, 70% said that the latest technologies were essential to growth, competitive advantage and customer experience. In two years, 61% expect technology investments to boost customer satisfaction, and 59% believe the technologies will help support innovation.

This may be, at least in part, because many healthcare organizations are in the process of kicking off digital transformation efforts and are relying on new technologies to achieve their goals. Though the process hasn’t advanced too far in many organizations, respondents all seem to be making some progress.

According to the survey, healthcare execs expect the importance of digital transformation to climb over the next several years. While 61% said it’s important today, 79% expect it to be important in two years and 86% believe that it will be important in five years.

To prepare for these eventualities, 23% of respondents said are planning digital transformation initiatives and 54% are piloting these approaches. In addition, 32% reported that their efforts were complete in some areas and 2% said their process was complete in all areas. Almost half (48%) said a lack of mature technology was holding back their efforts.

When asked to name the technologies they expected to use, 76% of healthcare leaders predicted that big data and analytics will help them transform their business. They also named cloud computing (65%), IoT technologies (46%) and AI (28%) as tools likely to foster digital transformation process.

I don’t know about you, but personally, I’d be pretty upset if I’d spent tens or hundreds of millions of dollars on this wave of health IT and felt that I’d gotten little value out of it. And given that history, I’d be reluctant to make any new investments until I was confident things play out differently this time.

Under these circumstances, it’s not surprising that healthcare execs are taking their time with implementing digital transformation, as important as this process may be. With any luck, the next wave of digital technology will be more flexible and offer greater ROI than the previous generation.

Real-Time Health Systems (RTHS) and Experiential Wayfinding

Posted on May 19, 2017 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Jody Shaffer from Jibestream.

You have probably heard about Real-Time Health Systems (RTHS). This is a game-changing trend among healthcare providers where the delivery of healthcare is transforming to a more aware and patient-centric system. Providers are leveraging technology to get pertinent information to decision makers as quickly as possible empowering them to make more informed decisions in real-time. Facilities that are amenable to change will remain strong in competitive markets, while those who are reluctant to adapt will fall behind.

As we entered this new era in healthcare, providers are faced with a series of challenges. Smart medical devices are transforming the healthcare dynamic as medical data and information is produced and multiplying at an exponential rate, yet it’s use has not been keeping pace. This data overload has created a significant obstacle for healthcare providers to overcome. There is also intense pressure to create a consumer and patient experience that is dynamic, accessible and engaging.

So the question is, how can healthcare providers quickly process and interpret copious amounts of data into a digestible format for immediate patient consumption while internalizing and translating the same data into operational intelligence?

The answer lies in evolving to a paradigm that is situationally aware and patient-centric in both operations and management. Not only is this pivotal in successfully achieving a RTHS, it ensures that healthcare providers connect, communicate and collaborate more effectively than they have in the past.

When looking to achieve a Real-Time Healthcare System, there are four primary phases that need to be addressed:

Phase 1 – Collecting data

Phase 2 – Processing data

Phase 3 – Translating data into intelligence

Phase 4 – Utilizing/sharing data

The final two phases are essential for healthcare providers to excel in this changing market dynamic and meet increasing patient expectations.

To yield valuable intelligence, data needs to be presented with situational context. Raw data is in itself useful for analytics, but can only be leveraged to create spatial awareness when augmented with location-based data.

Consumers have grown accustomed to the convenience of real-time access to information from mobile devices and apps, and healthcare is no exception. Through a combination of location-aware technologies, hospitals can eliminate some of patient’s biggest frustrations fostering a more positive patient experience across the continuum of care.

Mobile apps, digital maps and interactive kiosks leverage connected technologies to help create a more familiar and engaging environment promoting an effortless and seamless patient experience.

Experiential wayfinding, made available through these technologies, form the foundation for enhancing patient experience, which is paramount to the success of a healthcare organization. Experiential wayfinding reduces the complexity of indoor spaces by anticipating where people are going and what they are looking for. It can be used to direct visitors to a facility and identify parking availability nearest their desired location. Once there, it can be used to guide visitors to destination(s) within a facility using turn-by turn directions making it easy and less stressful to get where they need to go.

An integrated platform can also enable proactive interactions engaging patients before, during, and after hospital visits. The use of mobile messaging to deliver contextual content based on a patient’s location and profile help create a more pleasant and efficient patient experience. Prior to a visitor’s departure to a hospital, the facility’s mobile apps can share information such as appointment delays or traffic delays to take into account on the way there. Mobile messaging also enables facilities to communicate with visitors by sending appointment reminders, context-aware messages, preparation guidelines, post-care instructions, and more. Another application of this can save patients the frustration of intolerable wait-times when a hospital is stretched beyond capacity by sending notifications to offer a change of appointment or alternate appointment location.

Location awareness and spatial context benefit both patients and healthcare providers alike. For clinicians and healthcare teams, this translates to accelerated productivity facilitated through visibility, the streamlining of processes resulting in the elimination of inefficiencies, minimizing staff interruptions, and a balance between resources and demand.

When managed properly, a RTHS enables healthcare providers to improve patient satisfaction and outcomes by leveraging the vast amount of data made available through connected computers, technologies and medical equipment across hospitals, clinics, and patient homes.

By merging the location dimension into healthcare systems, providers are able to bring order to complex data. Through geoenrichment and data visualization, providers can improve patient experiences and outcomes, uncover previously unseen data patterns, realize workflow efficiencies through connected technologies and enrich business insights leading to better more actionable decisions.

Behind the Scenes: Preparing for a RTHS Transition

  • Digitization of Space (converting CAD/DWG map files to SVG)
    Before data can be presented in the context of a map, healthcare providers need to digitize their space. This provides a scalable platform for plotting data to support multiple use cases.
  • Connect core systems and data
    Leveraging technology that offers interoperability allows for seamless integration of core systems and data
  • Connect assets and people
    Create situational awareness by connecting to assets and people
  • Connect maps to data with Indoor Positioning Systems (IPS)
    Look for a solution that offer a technology agnostic architecture to calibrate maps Indoor Positioning
  • Implementation
    Make all this available by extending solution to patient and nonpatient hospital workflows

About Jody Shaffer
Jody Shaffer is an experienced marketer with more than 13 years in the software industry. Jody currently leads the marketing department at Jibestream, an award-winning company specializing in indoor mapping and location intelligence solutions. The company’s platform provides developers with the tools to build custom map-enabled applications unlocking the full potential of the Internet of Things (IoT). Jibestream’s platform can be found implemented in hospitals and health care facilities across north America.

What Kind of User Experience Are You Offering Patients?

Posted on May 3, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Centric Digital put out a look at the User Experience Trends we should expect in healthcare in 2017. Check out their findings:

*Click on the image to see the larger version.

The summary on the image offers some great insights for hospitals and healthcare organizations as they consider their patient experience plans:

“In 2017, we’ll likely see increases in mobile-first & user-centered design, deep personalization, and conversational AI elements (e.g., bots) implemented across a range of sites for greater engagement.”

How’s your hospital doing at these items?

My guess is that most hospitals are not on trend. I wonder if hospitals even know what mobile-first is and how many have rolled out a mobile-first experience for their patients. My guess is that most hospitals have looked at their website on mobile and possibly implemented a responsive website.

Going beyond that, how many hospitals have created user-centered design. There’s a simple test to know if you’re focused on the user or not. Go to your hospital website and evaluate whether your website encourages engagement or whether your website discourages engagement by users. The reality is that most hospital websites discourage engagement.

We don’t even need to start down the road of discussing deep personalization and conversational AI elements. Let’s start with a mobile-first user centered design and then we can talk about the deep personalization and conversational AI that could benefit your hospital.

While I find these trends interesting, I don’t think I agree with Brenda who shared the image above that these will be the trends for 2017. This sounds more like where the cutting edge organizations are innovating as opposed to the industry trends.

How’s your organization doing in these areas? Are you offering these kinds of user experience to your patients?

E-Patient Update: If Hospitals Were Like Airports

Posted on June 6, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

Almost everyone reading this blog has spent some time in an airport. And though not much of it is visible on the surface, airlines do an amazing job of managing people and things seamlessly while you sit reading the New York Times and drinking your latte. People are ushered on and off of flights, baggage is dispatched around the world and airplanes maintained and fueled at a miraculous pace. Although, you probably forget about that when it’s your flight that has delays or issues.

The hospitals many of us work for also do an amazing job of managing people and things, typically in a way that patients never need notice. While the carefully orchestrated dance of care plays out, patients simply eat their meals, sleep, visit with their friends and family and provide whatever bodily fluids are necessary to diagnose them. Meanwhile, multi-million dollar IT systems help see to it that the process works.

In some ways, however, the two industries are quite different in how they work with the people they serve. And in my opinion, the healthcare system would work better if it borrowed from the airlines when it comes to using IT to simplify the customer experience.

Status updates

One thing airlines do well is keep passengers informed about the status of their flight, or the flights of those for whom they might be waiting. Airlines began posting real-time schedules and allowing passengers to preregister for flights from early in the emergence of the commercial Internet.

In more recent times, the airlines have added a mobile dimension to their customer experience, offering small but valuable services like reminder texts and mobile-only information. While being able to check on your flight from your home desktop is great, it’s even better to know what’s up as you head for the airport, and mobile apps make this possible.

Traffic information

Unlike hospitals, airlines post scrolling information on key progress indicators — i.e. arrivals and departures. While you, as a consumer, typically only need to know the status of your own flight, having a comprehensive information source sometimes allows you to better understand delays, orient yourself to time and place and even make a mental note as to which destinations your chosen airline travels.

Such displays don’t disclose any personal information about passengers, but they still offer some value to individuals, if for no other reason than that having this information available helps to put airline staff and consumers on the same page.

Kiosks

These days, many airlines allow passengers to check in for their flights and print tickets without ever speaking to a human clerk. The process not only saves time, but also personal aggravation, as waiting in long airline ticketing queues can be quite tiring.

Checking in at a kiosk also offers passengers additional reassurance that they are indeed booked on the fight of their choice, allows them to confirm their seating choice and in some cases, even add additional flight options.

Transparency is key

I could go on, but I’m sure you get the idea. By exposing what might otherwise have been internal systems to consumers, airlines have substantially improved aspects of their customers’ experience. And they’ve done so without exposing individualized data or subjecting themselves to increased risk of hacking episodes. On the other hand, while health systems and hospitals have dabbled in these areas — for example, by posting ED waiting times on the web — it’s still something of a rarity for them to share live patient information.

Admittedly, hospitals may be leery of giving the patient too much visibility into the process they undergo. After all, their interaction with consumers is a good deal more complex than that of the airline industry, and they don’t have time to explain what they’re doing and why beyond a certain degree.

Still, as a patient who wants to know what the heck is going on with my care, a little transparency would go a long way. If you want patients to be prepared to care for themselves, treat them like adults and include them in what you’re doing.