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NYC Health Systems Get $7M To Share Data

Posted on January 29, 2014 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

Seven New York City health systems have gotten a delayed Christmas present — a $7 million grant designed to encourage data sharing initiatives and improve patient recruitment for clinical trials. The primary goal of the project is to use evidence-based research to help patients make good decisions about their healthcare.

The funding comes from a group known as the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, or PCORI. PCORI, which will create a clinical data research network in NYC, has already created 29 such networks across the nation, according to Healthcare IT News.

These networks, collectively, will form PCORnet, a $93.5 million patient-centered research initiative. The New York City Clinical Data Research Network (NYC-CDRN), a  consortium of 22 regional organizations, will work together to develop systems supporting data networking efforts and advance patient-centered research, Healthcare IT News reports.

NYC-CDRN will kick off their efforts by identifying patients with diabetes, obesity and cystic fibrosis. It will then partner with patients and clinicians by creating disease-specific community groups.

The NYC-CDRN network will connect medical records for 6 million New York City residents, then anonymize the records, and over the next 18 months, will work to standardize the data. Ultimately, the goal is to allow patients and providers to have access to evidence-based information they can use to make smart healthcare choices.

This should be an interesting project to watch over the next year and a half. PCORI is doing a lot of forward-thinking work with its money, including $5 million to the NIH for a tool called PROMIS designed to help with comparative effectiveness research. PROMIS has existed since 2004, but PCORI is now helping it move forward, making the $5 million in funds available  in research grants up to $500,000 for projects up to two years in length.

The great sucking sound: For-profit buyouts a drain on communities

Posted on December 14, 2010 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

Few have spent more time than I calling out non-profit hospitals on their inadequate charity care levels.  But when it comes down to

This picture shows a panorama of Boston (USA).

Boston, there's a new predator in town

it, I’d prefer a non-profit whose chain can be yanked over a for-profit with no public service requirements at all.

I was reminded of my concerns this week when I heard about the two hospitals Cerberus Capital Management agreed to acquire this week.  It’s picking the hospitals up from Essent Healthcare, another for-profit.  Cerberus, a New York-based private equity firm, just spent $900 million for the six-hospital non-profit chain Caritas Christi. That gave them a nice foothold in Boston, an incredibly competitive but opportunity-rich environment.

Really, both of deals the two-headed guardian of the afterlife has chosen seem to be good ones — for them.  While I’m not privy to much financial information on any of the eight hospitals, we do know that Caritas Christi was in big trouble financially.

I’d wager that the other two hospitals, which lie in the Boston suburbs, are in bad need of a capital infusion to prop them up during these bad times.  This situation allows the firm to swoop in, buy equipment, get things shipshape and get their money many times over.  Oh, and probably do a nice job of squeezing the health plans, now that they’re getting critical mass. Again, good for them.

The thing is, I strongly doubt that any private equity firm is going to have the interests of the community in mind.  One way or another, in most of the private equity buyouts I’ve followed, all of the extra money generated by improvements ends up in the bulging bank account of the PE guys.  They’re not in ANY investment for the long term; that’s just not what they do.  They’re there to pillage, however, legally, and get the hell out.

Far too often, PE players get into a deal, drag the hospitals down financially and then more or less shrug their shoulders when the facility plunges into the red.

The PE firm doesn’t give a rat’s patoot — they’ve made their money. The often-struggling community is left with, well, not a whole lot.

I’d argue that this is a travesty.  We need, as professionals and healthcare consumers, to keep hospitals as community asset with a strong bank account and a long-term view.

So, my question to you is this. Is it inevitable, during this period of transition to full-out reform, that community hospitals get decimated?

NYC’s shame: Psychiatric nightmare continues

Posted on August 22, 2010 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

 

Alan Aviles: Don’t stay in his psych ward

 Since psychiatric patient Esmin Green died, ignored, on the floor of King’s County Hospital in 2008, I’ve repeatedly argued that far too few heads have rolled.  If it were in my power, I’d particularly like to show the door to Alan Aviles, head of the city’s Health & Hospitals Corp.  But some may have thought I was too quick to condemn Mr. Aviles, who, admittedly, has one hell of a job on his hands.  

Now, tell me again that the psychiatric mismanagement and patient violence at King’s County are nobody’s fault.  

It’s 2010, and the leadership at King’s County has allegedly been shaken, stirred and rocked. But once again, staff have again been found to have hidden very seveve deficiencies in their behavioral health unit. Need an example? Here’s an ugly one. One particularly unlucky patient was left alone long enough, often enough, to attempt suicide, get sexually assualted and attempt suicide again.  

In theory, these things shouldn’t be able to happen any more. When HHC settled a suit brought the the U.S. Department of Justice, it agreed to be supervised by a judge for five years. Perhaps the judge and Aviles are old golfing buddies?  Seriously, folks, this just isn’t funny.  

Anyway, don’t take my word for it:  read this well-researched piece  from the New York Daily News and tell me why there’s a single senior manager still in place at HHC, much less King’s County.  While it was published in April,  somehow I doubt things have changed much. I’d be embarassed to work there.