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What If You Live Tweeted an EHR Go Live?

Posted on December 3, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Have you ever wondered what an EHR go live is like? Ok, those of you who have been through one probably don’t want to relive that experience and may even have a little PTSD from the experience. However, as an EHR addict myself, I couldn’t resist watching the Golden Valley Memorial Healthcare (GVMH) in Clinton, MO live tweet their MEDITECH Expanse go live on the @gvmhe Twitter account.

I loved this kind of transparency and documenting of a go live. Pretty cool to see the process. The only thing I wish they would have done is used a hashtag throughout and shared it with others that were tweeting about the go live. If they had, then it would have been easier to find great tweets like this one from their CMIO Bill Dailey, MD:

I won’t share the full go live stream since you can go and read it on the @gvmhe account. However, here were some tweets that stood out.


This is an exciting and nerve wracking part of any go-live.


I’m sure the team will look back on this picture fondly. Plus, they’ll probably note all the people who were too busy to get in on the picture.


One of the best and worst parts of a go-live. The countdown clock which shows you how long until the real work begins and how much time you have left to finish your preparations. It’s always ironic that there’s always more prep that could be done, but you have to go live anyway.


You have to have a little fun during the go live.


The stress is real. Is there an ICD-10 for EHR go lives?


It’s like New Year’s, but less champagne and kissing. I like the matching shirts though.


Another stressful clock


War room in action!


The inevitable issues of getting your vendors on the phone. I wonder how effective this tweet was in helping the vendor respond. Especially since the tweet above was the 2nd one.


The moment before go live.


15 minutes later!


Don’t forget the power of food during a go live.


Must be a pretty happy Christmas gift to have the go live done and with relatively few hiccups.


The reality of the first few days.


I wonder how they measured this, but pretty interesting to consider.


Monday with a full day of patients. Congrats GVMH!

I left off a number of things, so go and check out the full @gvmhe Twitter feed. Plus, you can follow along to see how the first few weeks on MEDITECH Expanse goes for them. I hope they keep tweeting once all the go live staff leave. That’s usually a challenging time as well.

My MEDITECH MD and CIO Forum Experience

Posted on October 29, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I recently had the pleasure of attending the annual MEDITECH MD and CIO Forum. Not only was the venue and MEDITECH hospitality great, but they also ordered up beautiful fall weather for the event in Boston. Although, I have to admit that it must be intimidating to speak at an event hosted in the round. Luckily all of the keynotes really delivered (See my post about Ted James, MD’s keynote).

As long-time readers know, there’s almost nothing better to me than attending a user conference. At user conferences, you hear the “from the trenches” perspectives on what’s life really like on the front lines of healthcare and technology. In many cases, you listen to sessions and discussions at lunch that sounds like they’re speaking another language. For the most part, that’s basically what they’re doing. The language of an EMR user is really unique and different and it’s what makes an EHR user conference like this so special. Those attending speak the same language and are able to uniquely help each other.

Given users’ propensity to share the good, the bad, and the ugly, it was really great that MEDITECH invited me to attend their MD and CIO Forum. The good news for them is that I’ve been to enough EHR user forums that I’ve heard it all. Nothing really shocks me anymore and every EHR vendor has their challenges. In one session, someone commented on the 500 open tickets they had with support. I think it kind of scared MEDITECH that I was hearing this. However, I’d recently heard from someone using their competitor’s EHR who had 4000 open tickets. Only 500 tickets sounded quite good comparatively. Perspective and nuance really matter when you talk about problems. That’s something that’s often missed by many media these days.

While at the Forum, MEDITECH made a number of interesting announcements. Read on for details below and check out the 4 video interviews we live streamed from the conference on Facebook. The biggest announcement from my viewpoint was around voice enabling the MEDITECH EHR software. Together in partnership with Nuance, MEDITECH created a simple way for users to request information from the EHR using their voice and even to create orders. On the mobile side, they’re creating similar functionality in partnership with Google’s voice recognition. No doubt this is just the start of voice enabling the EHR.

It’s easy to see how voice will become really valuable if providers are able to get information and create orders while their hands are tied up examining the patient. MEDITECH was also smart about the voice created orders. It doesn’t just order things automatically but queues up those orders for the doctors to approve later. This is a common step we’ve seen smart vendors take when adding voice and other AI to the documentation process. We’ll see over time whether the accuracy and trust reach the point that this human verification process is no longer needed.

MEDITECH also announced a number of things around interoperability. First, outbound FHIR integrations are included in every MEDITECH EHR. Plus, they’re working on inbound FHIR integrations. They didn’t set a timeline on inbound integrations but they did say they’d be “coming soon.” MEDITECH also talked about their new API called MEDITECH Greenfield. If you want more information on Greenfield, be sure to read our interview with Niraj Chaudhry where we cover it in detail.

Another interesting announcement was MEDITECH’s new population health oriented integration with Arcadia.io. It’s great to see MEDITECH embracing outside third party data that can help their users provide better care to patients. Plus, the integration looked really seamless from a physician user perspective.

Another big takeaway for me came from a session on governance and end user buy-in. The takeaway was simple. Enduser buy-in and governance are a challenge regardless of what EHR system you choose. To get more specific insights into how to improve buy-in and governance in your organization, check out the live tweets I shared on the #MDCIO2018 hashtag on Twitter.

A few other observations from the event are that I don’t think most people appreciate what a huge step forward Expanse (their latest EHR platform) is for MEDITECH and their users. I’ve often written that there’s no one feature about EHR software that’s hard to implement. However, it’s the 1000 features you need to create a complete EHR that makes it such a challenge. It was a pretty brave thing for a 50-year-old company, MEDITECH, to go back and start nearly from scratch using the latest technology to create Expanse. That means that Expanse is still a work in progress where they’re adding features as fast as they can. However, it also is true that it might be the only EHR software that was built in the post-meaningful use era.

I was also surprised by a number of users I talked to who commented on how the price of MEDITECH really mattered to their organization. I’m not sure if these organizations had read the many stories of expensive EHR implementations damaging healthcare organizations financially or if they were just more fiscally conservative organizations. Either way, you could tell these users appreciated that MEDITECH charged a much lower price for their software than other EHR competitors out there.

All in all, I had a great experience at the MEDITECH MD and CIO Forum. Their users really reflect the culture of MEDITECH. They’re largely unassuming and just want to do what’s best for their patients. It was actually fascinating to see how the same cultures seemed to attract. No doubt, their users were still suffering from burnout like so many others. That’s common across all of healthcare. They also still had their long list of features and functions they wanted to be implemented. However, I have yet to attend an EHR user conference where that wasn’t the case.

Note: MEDITECH is a sponsor of Healthcare Scene.

Insights from Ted James, MD at the MEDITECH MD & CIO Forum

Posted on October 17, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Over the next couple days, I’m attending the MEDITECH MD and CIO Forum. This is essentially the user conference for the MD and CIO users of MEDITECH software. This morning, they kicked off the event with Ted James, MD, Medical Director at BIDMC/Harvard Medical School. He provided a number of great insights into what’s happening in healthcare and what leaders can do to be more successful.

Below you’ll find a Twitter summary of Ted James, MD’s keynote. You can also watch the live video interviews I’m doing from the event on the Healthcare Scene Facebook page and follow along on Twitter using the hashtag #MDCIO2018.


Healthcare change seems to be an ever ongoing theme. The question really is around the pace of change.


Anyone that’s been through meaningful use understands this experience.


Routine is a powerful idea. So powerful that it prevents change.


Leadership is the key to any change and was a definite theme from Ted James, MD’s keynote.


I love the concept of nudges, but it only works for a subset of use cases in healthcare. Why? Because so many things in healthcare are really complex.


These 3 ideas were really interesting, but I definitely need more time to fully process what they mean. What do you think of these 3 ideas?


This was a really fascinating idea. It illustrates the need to constantly communicate changes so that people get use to the change before the change even occurs. Familiarity with something changes the experience.


Moving an iceberg feels like an apt descrition of healthcare.


This reminds me of when I recently heard that more yoga won’t fix the physician burnout problem.


This is an important lesson for leaders.


This was a refreshing experience to see so many women at a MD and CIO event.

Check back later for more coverage from the MEDITECH MD and CIO Forum.

New MEDITECH EHR API – An Interview with Niraj Chaudhry

Posted on October 2, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The EHR API has been a hot topic lately. Many healthcare organizations and startup companies are looking to EHR vendors in order to connect applications that exist outside the EHR with the EHR. Years ago (2012 to be exact), I wrote that the EHR is the database of healthcare and with all of these APIs coming out, we’re seeing that come to fruition.

The good news is that EHR vendors are finally starting to embrace this viewpoint as well. Many of you have probably read Colin Hung’s article that looks at 2 EHR vendors and their APIs. Many of you probably saw the announcement of MEDITECH’s new app development environment called MEDITECH Greenfield. It’s great to see MEDITECH launching an API for developers who want to engage with their Expanse platform. To learn more about this new platform, we sat down with Niraj Chaudhry, Director of Development Advanced Technology Division from MEDITECH.

What’s the motivation for MEDITECH to launch Greenfield?

Interoperable, open architecture EHR platforms that promote sharing resources for collective growth are critical for driving innovation and progress in today’s healthcare paradigm. By offering a space for mobile app development, MEDITECH is adding more capabilities and value to our customers’ EHRs and driving efficiencies for better community outcomes. Our customers will be able to enhance the EHR experiences of their providers, patients, and consumers with innovative apps available on any mobile device.

Greenfield is a natural extension of what we’ve done with MEDITECH Expanse and reinforces our commitment to a mobile, web-based EHR. We are excited about working with third-party developers and increasing our visibility with the creation of apps to augment Expanse.

What data will developers be able to access through Greenfield?  Is it a read-only environment or will developers be able to write back to MEDITECH using the Greenfield API as well?

Currently, our testing environment includes a list of available Common Clinical Data Set APIs and associated documentation. These APIs support GET methods and so give read-only access to the data. Developers can register now to get started. More APIs will be added to the Greenfield in future which will support other methods such as PUT and POST, and so will allow the ability to write data back to the Greenfield environment.

Will Greenfield only work with Expanse or will it work with other MEDITECH products?

Currently, MEDITECH Greenfield is available to MEDITECH Expanse customers.

Are there costs associated with companies participating in Greenfield (ie. signup and/or usage)?

There are no costs to sign up, access or use Greenfield.

What type of promotion will you do for companies who choose to leverage MEDITECH Greenfield in their application? What are you planning to do so MEDITECH users learn about new partners?

In the future, we plan on highlighting select (or “preferred”) mobile apps that we feel add significant value to the MEDITECH platform. This is still in the very early stages and business models for how we will list or promote apps are being discussed.

Will any company be able to sign up for Greenfield or will you restrict it to a certain number of companies or certain types of companies?

Any interested developers can sign up for access through a secure login process here.

An EHR Vendor’s Efforts to Address Physician Burnout with Corinne Proctor Boudreau from MEDITECH

Posted on January 24, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Physician burnout is a major problem in healthcare. While there are a lot of things that are contributing to physician burnout, many like to point to the EHR as a major reason why so many physicians are getting burnt out. So, while the EHR can’t completely solve physician burnout, a well designed EHR can help to alleviate some of the stress a physician experiences.

With this idea in mind, we jumped at the chance to sit down with Corinne Proctor Boudreau, Senior Manager, Physician Experience at MEDITECH, to learn about what MEDITECH is hearing from their customers about physician burnout and what they’ve been doing and plan to do to alleviate this challenging problem.

Check out our full physician burnout interview with Corinne Proctor Boudreau embedded below or on YouTube.

You can find all of Healthcare Scene’s interviews on the Healthcare Scene YouTube channel. Also, at the start of the video, I mentioned our new conference, Health IT Expo happening at the end of May in New Orleans. We hope you’ll all be able to join us in New Orleans to learn about practical innovations that can benefit your organization.

Hospitals Puts Off Patient Billing For Several Months During EMR Rollout

Posted on January 6, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

Here’s something you don’t see every day. A New Hampshire hospital apparently delayed mailing out roughly 10,000 patient bills going back as far as 11 months ago while it rolled out its new EMR.

According to a report in the Foster’s Daily Democrat,  members of Frisbie Memorial Hospital’s medical staff recently went public with concerns about the hospital’s financial state. Then a flood of delayed patient bills followed, some requesting thousands of dollars, the paper reported.

Hospital officials, for their part, said the delay was planned. Hospital president John Marzinzik said Frisbie needed time to implement its new Meditech EMR and didn’t want to send out incorrect bills during the rollout.

In fact, Marzinzik told Foster’s, under the previous system, records generated during doctor visits weren’t compatible with forms for hospital billing.

Rather than relying further on this patchwork of incompatible systems, Marzinzik and his staff decided to wait until the process was “absolutely clean” for patients. The hospital decided to have a staff member validate every balance shown on a statement before sending them out, he says.

Previously, in December of last year, anonymous Frisbie medical staff members sent Foster’s a letter to share concerns about the hospital and its administrators. The criticisms included skepticism about the over-budget implementation of the $13.5 million Meditech system, which they named as one of the reasons they lack confidence in the hospital administration. The staff members said that this cost overrun, as well as other problems, have undermined the hospital’s financial position.

As is always the case in such situations, hospital leaders took the stage to deny these allegations. Frisbie Senior VP Joe Shields told the paper that the hospital is in sound financial condition, and also said that the only reason why the Meditech project went over budget by $1.5 million was that the administrators delayed the implementation by seven weeks to give the staff holiday time off.

Hmmm. I don’t know about you, but to me, some parts of this story look a little bit bogus. For example:

* I appreciate accurate hospital bills as much as anybody, but the staff was going to check them manually anyway, why did it take 10 or 11 months for them to do so?

* The holidays take place at the same time every year.  Did administrators actually forget they were coming to an event that necessitated an almost 10% cost overrun?

Of course, only a small number of people know the answers to these questions, and I’m certainly not one of them. But the whole picture is a little bit odd.

When It Comes To Meaningful Use, Some Vendors May Have An Edge

Posted on December 1, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

A new article appearing in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association has concluded that while EHRs certified under the meaningful use program should perform more or less equally, they don’t.

After conducting an analysis, researchers found that there were significant associations between specific vendors and level of hospital performance for all six meaningful use criteria they were using as a yardstick. Epic came out on top by this measure, demonstrating significantly higher performance on five of the six criteria.

However, it’s also worth noting that EHR vendor choice by hospitals accounted for anywhere between 7% and 34% of performance variation across the six meaningful use criteria. In other words, researchers found that at least in some cases, EHR performance was influenced as much by the fit between platform and hospital as the platform itself.

To conduct the study, researchers used recent national data on certified EHR vendors hospitals and implemented, along with hospital performance on six meaningful use criteria. They sought to find out:

  • Whether certain vendors were found more frequently among the highest performing hospitals, as measured by performance on Stage 2 meaningful use criteria;
  • Whether the relationship between vendor and hospital performance was consistent across the meaningful use criteria, or whether vendors specialized in certain areas; and
  • What proportion of variation in performance across hospitals could be explained by the vendor characteristics

To measure the performance of various vendors, the researchers chose six core stage two meaningful use criteria, including 60% of medication orders entered using CPOE;  providing 50% of patients with the ability to view/download/transmit their health information; for 50% of patients received from another setting or care provider, medication reconciliation is performed; for 50% of patient transitions to another setting or care provider, a summary of care record is provided; and for 10% of patient transitions to another setting or care provider, a summary of care record is electronically transmitted.

After completing their analysis, researchers found that three hospitals were in the top performance quartile for all meaningful use criteria, and all used Epic. Of the 17 hospitals in the top performance quartile for five criteria, 15 used Epic, one used MEDITECH and one another smaller vendor. Among the 68 hospitals in the top quartile for four criteria, 64.7% used Epic, 11.8% used Cerner and 8.8% used MEDITECH.

When it came to hospitals that were not in the top quartile for any of the criteria, there was no overwhelming connection between vendor and results. For the 355 hospitals in this category, 28.7% used MEDITECH, 25.1% used McKesson, 20.3% used Cerner, 14.4% used MEDHOST and 6.8% used Epic.

All of this being said, the researchers noted that news the hospital characteristics nor the vendor choice explained were then a small amount of the performance variation they saw. This won’t surprise anybody who’s seen firsthand how much other issues, notably human factors, can change the outcome of processes like these.

It’s also worth noting that there might be other causes for these differences. For example, if you can afford the notably expensive Epic systems, then your hospital and health system could likely afford to invest in meaningful use compliance as well. This added investment could explain hospitals meaningful use performance as much as EHR choice.

Is Allscripts An Also-Ran In The Hospital EMR Business?

Posted on August 18, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

It all began with a question, as many classic tales do. Someone writing for the HIStalk.com website  – I think it was ever-anonymous, eponymous  leader Mr. HISTalk – asked readers to answer the question “Who will benefit most from the proposed acquisition of McKesson EIS by Allscripts?”

The survey results were themselves worth a read:

* Approximately 29% voted for “McKesson customers”
* About 27% voted for “Allscripts customers”
* 8.4% voted for “McKesson shareholders”
* Roughly 23% voted for “Allscripts shareholders”
* About 13% voted for “Allscripts competitors”

Two things about these responses interested me. One is that almost a third of respondents seem to think McKesson will make the bigger score after being acquired by Allscripts. The other is that a not-inconsiderable 13% of the site’s well-informed readers think the deal will help Allscripts’ competitors. If these readers are right, perhaps Allscripts should rethink the deal.

I was even more engaged by the analysis that followed, which the writer took a close look at the dynamics of the hospital EMR market and commented on how Allscripts fit in. The results weren’t surprising, but again, if I were running Allscripts I’d take the following discussion seriously.

After working with data supplied by Blain Newton, EVP of HIMSS Analytics, the writer drew some firm conclusions. Here are some of the observations he shared:

  • While McKesson has twice as many hospitals as Allscripts, most of these hospitals have less than 150 beds, which means that the acquisition may offer less benefit, he suggests.
  • In addition to having only 3% of hospitals overall, Allscripts controls only 6% of the 250+ bed hospital market, which probably doesn’t position it for success. In contrast, he notes, Epic controls 20% of this market and Meditech 19%.
  • His sense is that while hospitals typically want a full suite of products when they work with Epic, Cerner or Meditech, Allscripts customers may be more prone to buying just a few key systems.
  • Ultimately, he argues, Cerner, Epic and Meditech have a commanding lead in this market, for reasons which include that the three are well ahead when it comes to the overall number of hospital served.
  • Given his premise, he believes that Epic is at the top of the pyramid, as it has almost double the number of hospitals with 500+ beds that Cerner does.

To cap off his analysis, Mr. HISTalk concludes that market forces make it unlikely that a dark horse will squeeze out one of the top hospital EMR vendors: “Everybody else is eating their dust and likely to lose business due to hospital consolidation and a shift toward the most successful vendors as much as all of us who – for our own reasons – wish that weren’t the case.”

It would take a separate analysis to predict whether the top three hospital EMR vendors are likely to win out over each other, but Epic seems to hold the most cards. Last year, I wrote a piece suggesting that Cerner was edging up on Epic, but I’m not sure whether or not my logic still holds. Epic may indeed be King of the (HIT) Universe for the foreseeable future.

Achieve MU3: Measure 3 with these 5 MEDITECH Clinical Decision Support Interventions (CDSi)

Posted on August 11, 2017 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Kelly Del Gaudio, Principal Consultant at Galen Healthcare Solutions.

Over the past several years, there has been significant investment and effort to attest to the various stages of meaningful use, with the goal of achieving better clinical outcomes. One area of MU3 that directly contributes to improved clinical outcomes is implementation of Clinical Decision Support Interventions (CDSi). Medicaid hospitals must implement 5 CDSi and enable drug-drug and/or drug-allergy checking.

From looking at this measure it seems like a walk in the park, but how does your organization fair when it comes to CDS?

Thanks to First Databank, users of EMR’s have been accomplishing drug to drug and drug to allergy checking for over a decade, but what about the edge cases you think will be covered but aren’t? Take a patient that is allergic to contrast for example. Since imaging studies requiring contrast are not drugs, what happens when they are ordered? Are they checking for allergies? In most cases, additional configuration is required to get that flag to pop. This is usually where we come in.

Let’s take a look at a simple CDSi definition provided by CMS.gov

“CDS intervention interaction. Interventions provided to a user must occur when a user is interacting with technology. These interventions should be based on the following data:  Problem list; Medication list; Medication allergy list; Laboratory tests; and Vital signs. “

Without a decent rule writer on staff, there are limitations within MEDITECH for accomplishing full CDSi. The primary reason we started recording these discrete data elements in the first place is the glimmer of hope that they would someday prove themselves useful. That day is here, friends. (If you don’t believe me, check out IBM’s Watson diagnosing cancer on YouTube. . .you might want to block off your schedule.)

In collaboration with 9 hospitals as part of a MEDITECH Rules focus group – Project Claire[IT] – we researched and designed intuitive tools to address Clinical Quality Measures (eCQM’s) and incorporated them into a content package. If your organization is struggling to meet these measures or you are interested in improving the patient and provider experience, but don’t have the resources to dedicate to months of research and development, Project Claire[IT]’s accelerated deployment schedule (less than 1 month) can help you meet that mark. Below are just some examples of the eCQM’s and CDS delivered by Project Claire[IT].

CMS131v5     Diabetes Eye Exam
CMS123v5     Diabetes: Foot Exam
CMS22v5       Screening for High Blood Pressure and Follow-Up Documented

Synopsis: The chronic disease management template will only display questions relevant to the Problem List (or other documented confirmed problems since we know not everyone uses the problem list). Popup suggestions trigger orders reminding the provider to complete these chronic condition follow-up items before letting the patient out of their sights. Our goal was to save providers time by ordering all orders in 1 click.

CMS71v7     Anticoagulation Therapy for Atrial Fibrillation/Flutter
CMS102v6   Assessed for Rehabilitation

“The Framingham Heart Study noted a dramatic increase in stroke risk associated with atrial fibrillation with advancing age, from 1.5% for those 50 to 59 years of age to 23.5% for those 80 to 89 years of age. Furthermore, a prior stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) are among a limited number of predictors of high stroke risk within the population of patients with atrial fibrillation. Therefore, much emphasis has been placed on identifying methods for preventing recurrent ischemic stroke as well as preventing first stroke. Prevention strategies focus on the modifiable risk factors such as hypertension, smoking, and atrial fibrillation.” – CMS71v7

The above quote is taken directly from this measure indicating the use of the Framingham Heart Study we used to identify and risk stratify stroke. Claire[IT] content comes complete with three Framingham Scoring tools:

                Framingham Risk for Stroke
                Framingham Risk for Cardiovascular Disease
                Framingham Risk for Heart Attack

These calculators use all the aforementioned data elements to drive the score, interpretation and recommendations and the best part is they only require one click.

*User adds BP. BP mean auto calculates. Diabetes and Smoking Status update from the Problem List. Total Cholesterol and HDL update from last lab values.
Ten year and comparative risk by age auto calculates.

*User adds BP. BP mean auto calculates. Diabetes, Smoking Status, CVD, Afib and LVH update from the Problem List. On Hypertension meds looks to Ambulatory Orders.
Ten year risk auto calculates.

*User adds BP. BP mean auto calculates. Diabetes and Smoking Status update from the Problem List. Hypertension meds looks to Ambulatory Orders. Total Cholesterol and HDL update from lab values.
Ten year risk auto calculates.

CMS149v5      Dementia: Cognitive Assessment

Synopsis: Not only is this tool built specifically as a conversational assessment, it screens for 4 tiers of mental status within one tool (Mental Status, Education, Cognitive Function and Dementia). The utilization of popup messages allows us to overcome the barrier of character limits and makes for a really smooth display on a tablet or hybrid. Our popups are driven by the primary language field in registration and our content currently consists of English and Spanish translations.

CMS108v6     VTE Prophylaxis
CMS190v6     VTE Prophylaxis is the ICU

Synopsis: Patients that have an acute or suspected VTE problem with no orders placed for coumadin (acute/ambulatory or both) receive clinical decision support flags. Clicking the acknowledge tracks the user mnemonic and date/time stamp in an audit trail. Hard stops are also in place if NONE is chosen as a contraindication. The discharge order cannot be filed unless coumadin is ordered or a contraindication is defined. These rules evaluate the problem list and compare it to the medication list to present the provider with the right message.

Learn more about the work of our focus group and Project Claire[IT] by viewing our MEDITECH Clinical Optimization Toolkit.

VIEW THE TOOLKIT TO ACCESS:

  • Deliverable Package of Complex Rules, Assessments, CDS’s and Workflows
    • Problem List Evaluation
    • Total Parenteral Nutrition
    • Manage Transfer Guidance
  • Surveillance Dashboard Setup Guide
    • Dictionary Setup & Validation
  • 6.x Rules Setup Guide
    • Basic Rules for Assessments, Documents & Orders
  • IV Charge Capture Setup Guide

About Kelly Del Gaudio
Kelly is Principal Consultant at Galen Healthcare Solutions, and has been optimizing MEDITECH systems for over 10 years. She worked for MEDITECH on an elite 4-person team (the MEDITECH SWAT Team), whose sole concentration was clinical optimization, ROI analysis, MU certification, and achievement of HIMSS EMRAM Stage 6/7. Kelly currently leads Galen’s MEDITECH practice, and championed a focus group, which led to the delivery of Project Claire[IT], a MEDITECH content package of complex rules, assessments, CDS’s, and workflows that evaluate, suggest, and support documentation of chronic and acute problems. Learn more about Kelly in the #IAmGalen series.

About Galen Healthcare Solutions

Galen Healthcare Solutions is an award-winning, #1 in KLAS healthcare IT technical & professional services and solutions company providing high-skilled, cross-platform expertise and proud sponsor of the EMR Clinical Optimization Series. For over a decade, Galen has partnered with more than 300 specialty practices, hospitals, health information exchanges, health systems and integrated delivery networks to provide high-quality, expert level IT consulting services including strategy, optimization, data migration, project management, and interoperability. Galen also delivers a suite of fully integrated products that enhance, automate, and simplify the access and use of clinical patient data within those systems to improve cost-efficiency and quality outcomes. For more information, visit www.galenhealthcare.com. Connect with us on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn.

Top Hospital EMR and EHR Blog Posts for 2016

Posted on December 30, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It’s that time of year when you look back at the past year and think about what you’ve accomplished. At Hospital EMR and EHR, we like to look back at the stats for the top blog posts we’ve published. It’s always interesting to see what’s resonated with people. Plus, it’s interesting to see how things have changed since we’ve posted on a topic. So, without further ado, here’s a look at the top blog posts in 2016 for Hospital EMR and EHR along with some commentary on each.

1. Why Is It So Hard to Become a Certified Epic consultant? – This is by far the top post generating 4-10 times as much traffic as the posts below.  It’s also why I’ve wanted to make the time to do a whole series of blog posts on Epic Certification and along with it Cerner Certification, MEDITECH Certification, etc.  When you make something like Epic Certification hard to get, people want it even more.  It’s just too bad they’re so closed since it drives up the prices for Epic consultants and thus the cost to implement Epic.  Certainly, we’ll be writing about this more in the future.

2. NYC Hospitals Face Massive Problems With Epic Install – This was a big story back in 2013 and still is today.  We should probably look at doing a follow up story to see what’s happening at NYC hospitals a few years after this story hit.

3. Epic Install Triggers Loss At MD Anderson – No surprise, people love to read about challenges in EHR implementations.  We saw quite a few of these from Epic in 2016 and people were interested in what went wrong.  The problem from the outside is it’s really hard to know who is to blame for the failure.  What has become clear over this year is that many healthcare organizations are blaming Epic for their revenue issues.

4. Hospital EMR and EHR Vendors – This page needs some work, but no doubt many people want to know who the big players in the hospital EMR and EHR market are.  This is true if they’re selecting a new EHR, switching EHR or looking to partner with EHR companies.

5. Why Do People Dislike Epic So Much? Let Me Count The Ways – This post is 5.5 years old and still going strong.  I imagine many people are still counting the ways they hate Epic.  I think I read that Epic finally hired a PR person.  Maybe that new hire can work on this.

6. A Study on the Impact of ICD-10 on Coding and Revenue Cycle – This was a good study that illustrated the impact of ICD-10.  It also gave some good words of caution about the impact of ICD-10 going forward.

7. Epic EMR Costs Drag Down Finances At Brigham and Women’s – Another example of the cost to implement Epic.  I knew this was a hot topic this year and the stats show that people were interested in the details.

8. The Argument for Meditech – I can’t believe this post is 5 years old already, but it still rings true today.  MEDITECH is not without its challenges, but it also doesn’t get the credit it deserves either.  I had a chance to visit their offices near Boston this year.  I’ll be really interested to see where MEDITECH takes their product next.  Many people have counted them out, but I certainly haven’t.

9. Can HIM Professionals Become Clinical Documentation Improvement Specialists? – We’ve published a lot about the changing world of HIM thanks to our new series of HIM Scene blog posts.  This post was a great example of how there are a lot of new opportunities for HIM professionals that are willing to embrace change and adapt as needed.

10. Great Healthcare IT Leaders – This is a great list of healthcare IT leaders as shared by David Chou.  David made the case for meeting up with them at HIMSS 2016, but the nice part is thanks to social media you can follow most of them year round.

An honorable mention to the 11th post on the list which talks about Dr. Rasu Shrestha helping an injured passenger on his way to HIMSS 2016.  Love stories like this.  Did you have a favorite post on Hospital EMR and EHR?  Was there an idea or concept you read on Hospital EMR and EHR?  We’d love to hear about it in the comments.