Free Hospital EMR and EHR Newsletter Want to receive the latest news on EMR, Meaningful Use, ARRA and Healthcare IT sent straight to your email? Join thousands of healthcare pros who subscribe to Hospital EMR and EHR for FREE!

Small Financial Innovations that Make A Big Difference for Patients and Hospitals

Posted on May 3, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

More and more these days I’m fascinated by the practical innovations that can impact healthcare much more than the moonshot ideas which are great ideas but never actually impact healthcare. I’ve quickly come to believe that the way to transform healthcare his through hundreds of little innovations that will allow us to reach a transformative future.

I saw an example of this when I talked with PatientMatters. They work in a section of healthcare that many don’t consider sexy: revenue cycle management. However, I often say, the financial side of healthcare isn’t sexy, unless you care about money. Given how healthcare is getting pressed from every angle, every hospital I know is interested in the financial side of the equation.

PatientMatters is doing a number of things that are interesting when it comes to a patient’s financial experience in a hospital. They offer a great mix of tools, training, process design, automation and coaching to reframe a patient’s financial experience. This is a trend I’m seeing in more and more healthcare IT companies. It takes much more than technology to really change the experience.

That said, I was most intrigued by how PatientMatters offers unique payment plans to patients based on a wide variety of factors including current credit information, payment history for current financial obligations, and their residual income. From this information PatientMatters does an assessment of a patient’s ability to pay based on these five categories:

  1. Guarantors that generate this designation are the most likely to pay their full obligation. This population predictably pays their full balance more than 94% of the time. Recognizing these guarantors provides key savings to the hospital:
    • Because these guarantors are most likely to meet their obligation, conversations with the registration staff regarding payment are brief and concise.
    • Recognizing the high likelihood of guarantor payment performance, many hospitals elect to keep these accounts in-house and not refer to their early out vendors. This generates vendor savings for the hospital.
  1. These guarantors also have a high collections success rate, but they may need more time and slightly reduced payment plans to meet their obligation. Using data analytics to understand the guarantor allows the hospital to structure a custom payment plan with a high likelihood of performance.
  1. Guarantors in this category require a higher degree of attention from the registration team. This group struggles to meet their financial responsibilities. A hospital that spends the extra time working with the guarantor on a highly structured payment plan will see collection improvements with this population.
  1. These guarantors fall into two categories; a) a low likelihood of meeting their financial commitment or b) guarantor may meet hospital charity program, based on their FPL status. Scripting will help the registration assess the guarantor and identify the best solution.
  1. These guarantors will likely be unable to meet their hospital obligation. Many times these individuals will qualify for the hospital charity, Medicaid, County Indigent or other assistance programs.

It’s not hard to see how this more personalized approach to a patient’s financial experience makes a big difference when it comes to collections, patient satisfaction, etc. However, what I loved most about this approach was how simple it was to understand and process. It’s worth remembering that a hospital’s registration staff are generally one of the lowest paid, highest turnover positions in any hospital. So, simplicity is key.

I love seeing practical, innovative solutions like the one PatientMatters offers hospitals. They make a big difference on a hospital’s bottom line. However, they also create a much better experience for the patients who mostly want to get through the billing process and on to their care. How are you customizing the financial experience for your patients?

Hospitals Need to Diversify – What’s It Mean for EHR?

Posted on May 27, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In a recent article on Health CXO, they made the following comment:

In the report “Building Value: Investments Aimed at New Priorities Create Opportunities for Not-For-Profit Hospitals,” experts at the New York-based financial firm note that the decline in inpatient volumes seen over the past several quarters is no fluke but rather a long-term trend driven by health reform. This means that hospitals that want to remain successful need to look beyond just inpatient services and become full-service health systems that are able to follow the patients to the lower cost and frequently higher value outpatient setting. [emphasis added]

This trend is definitely worth noting. We’ve discussed the acquisition of outpatient clinics a number of times, but never the trend of declining inpatient volumes. The article suggests that the key to viability for a hospital will be to diversify into outpatient services. I’m not sure all hospitals want to become full-service health systems and so it will be interesting to see how this plays out.

Assuming this trend continues, I’ll be interested to see what this means for a hospital’s EHR strategy. Will they go with the one big EHR across their hospital and ambulatory environment? If you look at these recently posted EHR market share statistics, you can see that this method is happening a lot. As the deals get larger, I think we’ll see push back against moving to one unified EHR software. That presents an interesting opportunity for what Alan Portela and Airstrip are doing. Not to mention the need for a private HIE.

Hospital Chief Accused of $800,000 in Meaningful Use Fraud

Posted on February 12, 2014 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

Now here’s a case of the type I’ve never seen before, but expect to see more of it going forward given the temptations involved. According to the Dallas Morning News, the top administrator and CFO of a now closed chain of hospitals is facing charges that he defrauded the government of nearly $800,000 in EMR stimulus funds.

The administrator, Joe White, and the doctor who owned the hospitals, Tariq Mahmood, are accused of identity theft and stealing government healthcare funds. Meanwhile, it’s alleged that White falsely certified that Shelby Regional Medical Center in East Texas has met the requirements to receive Meaningful Use funds. Federal authorities assert that White used a computer ID and Social Security number belonging to another employee who had refused to attest at the hospital.

White is also accused of demanding that data be manually inserted from paper records into the incomplete EMR, in an effort to meet Meaningful Use qualifications.

This comes as a follow-up to the catastrophic failure of Mahmood’s six-hospital chain, which came after years of increasing financial chaos, with the hospitals mounting up millions of dollars in debts to vendors and landlords. As the hospitals fell apart financially, inspectors were documenting hundreds of patient care failures, the Dallas Morning News reports.

This came amid questions as to whether White was qualified to run a medical center, given his past record as a RadioShack salesman and a maintenance man.

The Often Missed Benefit of SaaS EHR

Posted on December 12, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I came across a great article by Geoffrey Moore on LinkedIn talking about “SaaS’s Real Triumph.” He suggests that the “greatest contribution of SaaS is to free the enterprise from the tyranny of the product release model.”

This is a really interesting concept. Far too often when we talk about SaaS EHR software we talk about the payments being spread out over time as opposed to a big lump sum payment up front. Plus, we love to talk about how that means you can leave that EHR software if you don’t like it. The former is an important consideration for every CFO. The later usually doesn’t play itself out as nicely since you often have to sign a contract for a certain number of years. However, at least if there are major issues you still hold most of the money.

I think Geoffrey is right about this rarely discussed benefit of SaaS. As he acknowledges, SaaS EHR software does have some level of ongoing disruption that must be dealt with, but it’s nothing like the disruption that occurs with a major product release form an enterprise software like an EHR. In fact, I think these major release updates are likely going to be the eventual downfall of the major EHR systems we know today. It won’t happen until after meaningful use, but it will present an opportunity for a scrappy startup. We’ll see if the current EHR companies will be able to adapt.

I’m sure many of you reading this have stories and experiences you can share on the topic of enterprise EHR upgrades. I look forward to reading them in the comments. Of course, I bet there’s just as many stories about hospital IT leadership being afraid of SaaS as well. The clash has begun.