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#HIMSS18: Pushing Inpatient Care Out

Posted on March 9, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

At present, we need acute care hospitals. Despite the fact that many types of care can now be delivered in outpatient settings, and chronic conditions managed remotely for connected health, there are still some treatments and procedures which can only be done in a big, expensive building.

That being said, some of what I saw at HIMSS18 has convinced me that the drive to push hospital-type services into the community has begun to pick up speed. While nobody seems to have a completely mature solution to decentralizing acute care, I saw some tools that might begin to solve the problem.

Perhaps the most direct example of this trend was offered by a Taiwanese company called Quanta Computer. (The booth was staffed with five company representatives who had flown here all the way from Taiwan, which may suggest that they are not fooling around.)

Quanta was here to pitch QOCA, whose capabilities include offering a “smart hospital at home.”  QOCA Home, an eldercare/assisted living solution including a central, easy to use terminal supporting a wide range of telehealth and connected health services. While the idea is not completely new, the way this blends a smart home approach with connected health intrigued me.

Other vendors took a different approach to some of the same core problems, i.e. managing the patient effectively outside of the hospital. For most exhibitors, this seemed to involve a blend of connected health, care management and patient/provider collaboration.

For example, vendor Virtual Health promises to deliver “whole person health” by tying together providers, healthcare execs, patients and care coordinators. Two points of interest: its solution include a collaborative workflow tool which seems to include patients, something I don’t believe I’ve seen before. Its platform, which is designed to support patients with highly complex medical needs, also addresses social determinants of health, including financial concerns and nutrition.

Now, I’m not here to tell you that any of this is revolutionary. The industry has been kicking around concepts like virtual hospital care, care coordination platforms and the integration of social determinants of health for quite some time, and I’m not suggesting that any of the vendors I saw seem to be all the way there.

Still, what I saw suggests to me that tech vendors are further along in delivering these options than they have been. If you haven’t looked into new platforms that address these issues, now might be the time. They may not be completely ready for prime time, but they’re well on their way.

Idea That Might Work: “Hospital at Home” Model Delivers Hospital-Level Care

Posted on November 27, 2011 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

Far too often, ideas developed by academics end up sitting in a dusty file or published by an insider journal that hospitals CEOs seldom see. In the following case, however, it seems academia and the hospital biz are seeing eye to eye on a new approach to acute care which could offer substantial savings.

A growing number of hospitals have begun to embrace the “Hospital at Home” model, an approach originally developed by the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine which offers hospital care to people in their own homes. HAH is focused on the elderly, not surprisingly given the high cost of caring for them, but I bet it’d offer advantages in caring for chronically-ill patients of just about any age.

While this approach isn’t as whiz-bang neat as, say, bringing an emergency department to a patient’s home — something already done in France — it’s a solid concept.

This model fits hand in glove with maturing technologies which monitor patients from afar while leaving in their home (tracking metrics like blood sugar, patient weight or cardiac functioning and shunting the data to doctors via the Internet).

According to a recent Forbes article, one of the biggest proponents of this approach is Presbyterian Healthcare Services, a New Mexico-based system which manages the largest program in the country. PHS has estimated that treatment averages one-third shorter than equivalent cases treated in an inpatient setting. And the system calculates that it’s saved $2,000 to $3,000 per case, as well. Neat stuff.

Folks, frankly I’m mystified that this approach hasn’t become more standard…or would be, I suppose, if the hospital industry I know and love didn’t have this habit of ignoring trends until they explode in someone’s face.

In any event, if any of you are implementing or even considering HAH, I’d love to hear from you. And if you think that this model can’t work, I’d love hearing from you even more. Let me have it!