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Texas Hospital Association Dashboard Offers Risk, Cost Data

Posted on January 22, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

The Texas Hospital Association has agreed to a joint venture with health IT vendor IllumiCare to roll out a new tool for physicians. The new dashboard offers an unusual but powerful mix of risk data and real-time cost information.

According to THA, physician orders represent 87% of hospital expenses, but most know little about the cost of items they order. The new dashboard, Smart Ribbon, gives doctors information on treatment costs and risk of patient harm at the point of care. THA’s assumption is that the data will cause them to order fewer and less costly tests and meds, the group says.

To my mind, the tool sounds neat. IllumiCare’s Smart Ribbon technology doesn’t need to be integrated with the hospital’s EMR. Instead, it works with existing HL-7 feeds and piggybacks onto existing user authorization schemes. In other words, it eliminates the need for creating costly interfaces to EMR data. The dashboard includes patient identification, a timer if the patient is on observational status, a tool for looking up costs and tabs providing wholesale costs for meds, labs and radiology. It also estimates iatrogenic risks resulting from physician decisions.

Unlike some clinical tools I’ve seen, Smart Ribbon doesn’t generate alerts or alarms, which makes it a different beast than many other clinical decision support tools. That doesn’t mean tools that do generate alerts are bad, but that feature does set it apart from others.

We’ve covered many other tools designed to support physicians, and as you’d probably guess, those technologies come in all sizes. For example, last year contributor Andy Oram wrote about a different type of dashboard, PeraHealth, a surveillance system targeting at-risk patients in hospitals.

PeraHealth identifies at-risk patients through analytics and displays them on a dashboard that doctors and nurses can pull up, including trends over several shifts. Its analytical processes pull in nursing assessments in addition to vital signs and other standard data sets. This approach sounds promising.

Ultimately, though, dashboard vendors are still figuring out what physicians need, and it’s hard to tell whether their market will stay alive. In fact, according to one take from Kalorama Information, this year technologies like dashboarding, blockchain and even advanced big data analytics will be integrated into EMRs.

As for me, I think Kalorama’s prediction is too aggressive. While I agree that many freestanding tools will be integrated into the EMR, I don’t think it will happen this or even next year. In the meantime, there’s certainly a place for creating dashboards that accommodate physician workflow and aren’t too intrusive. For the time being, they aren’t going away.

Adolescent Data Needs Stronger EMR Protections, Group Says

Posted on November 13, 2012 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

The American Academy of Pediatrics is calling for changes to EMRs to protect the privacy of adolescent patients, whom, it says, don’t currently get the same level of protection as adults.

According to the AAP, there are several reasons adolescents don’t enjoy the same privacy protections as adults.

For one thing, there are the legal issues. HIPAA doesn’t provide specific guidance on adolescent privacy, and the medical industry hasn’t put clear standards in place outlining when adults can access an adolescent’s health records either.

What’s more, states vary in how they handle this issue, according to the AAP report. State laws typically allow minors to consent for their healthcare on the basis of their status — for example, if they’re a pregnant or parenting teen — and on the basis of the services they seek  — such as STI diagnosis and treatment or contraception. However, while state and federal laws provide protection of privacy when minors  consent for their own care, privacy protections differ widely.

To make sure adolescent privacy is protected across all data platforms, the AAP is recommending a set of principles that it feels should ideally govern not only EMRs, but also PHRs and HIEs. These include :

*  Creation of a set of criteria for EMRs that meet adolescent privacy standards

*  Creating and implementing technology for EMRs which would allow determination of who has access to, or ability to control access to, any part of the adolescent medical record.

* Making it possible for adolescents to record consents and authorizations according to privacy laws using the HL-7 Child Health Profile DC.1.3.3 standard

*  Flexibility within standards to allow for protection of privacy for diagnoses, associated lab tests, problem lists and any other documentation containing confidential data.

* EMR systems must be able to apply state and federal confidentiality rules when assembling aggregate data to prevent identification of individuals.

The AAP has a lot more to say, but in summary, it seems to be putting the burden for protecting adolescent privacy largely on EMR vendors, though I believe it’s hoping members will advocate for these changes as well.

Either way, it doesn’t work well if there’s a protected class (certain adolescents) whose rights simply can’t be protected adequately with today’s technology.  Time to get on this issue, I’d say.