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Medical Coding, Revenue Cycle Management and the EHR – HIM Scene

Posted on July 31, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It’s unfortunate, but true that very few healthcare organizations thought about the impact the EHR selection and implementation would have on things like medical coding and revenue cycle management. The later has gotten more attention after hospitals implement an EHR and then run into cash flow problems when they realize their collections have started piling up after the EHR implementation. However, it’s surprising how many coding and revenue cycle management challenges exist post EHR go live.

With this in mind, Healthcare Scene recently talked with Susan Gatehouse, CEO of Axea Solutions, at the HFMA Annual conference about how EHR impacts medical coding and revenue cycle management. She shares some great insights into the topic and some practical ideas for those dealing with these challenges. Plus, we ask Susan what thing stood out to her at the HFMA annual conference.

Check out our interview with Susan Gatehouse:

*Note: This video was originally live streamed to Facebook, so please excuse the poorer quality video and audio.

Be sure to check out all of the Healthcare Scene interviews on YouTube. If you’d like to receive future HIM posts in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

A Look Into the Future of HIM with Rita Bowen – HIM Scene

Posted on June 14, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the HIM Series of blog posts. If you’d like to receive future HIM posts in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

One of my favorite people in the HIM world is Rita Bowen. She is currently Vice President, Privacy, Compliance and HIM Policy at MRO, but she has a really impressive HIM resume previous to MRO and a deep understanding of the evolution of HIM and their role in healthcare.

With this experience in mind, I was excited to interview her on the current state of HIM and where HIM is heading in the future. Here are the list of questions I asked Rita if you want to skip to a specific question or you can just watch the full video interview embedded at the bottom of this post.

If you’d like to receive future HIM posts in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

Making the Case for a Unique Patient Identifier – #MyHealthID

Posted on April 13, 2016 I Written By

Erin Head is the Director of Health Information Management (HIM) and Quality for an acute care hospital in Titusville, FL. She is a renowned speaker on a variety of healthcare and social media topics and currently serves as CCHIIM Commissioner for AHIMA. She is heavily involved in many HIM and HIT initiatives such as information governance, health data analytics, and ICD-10 advocacy. She is active on social media on Twitter @ErinHead_HIM and LinkedIn. Subscribe to Erin's latest HIM Scene posts here.

Healthcare is a high priority for the US Government and as HIM professionals, we know the importance of keeping our fingers on the pulse of issues facing our nation. We must stay current with proposed regulatory changes and those that address the needs of the US healthcare system as they relate to HIM, privacy and security, and Health IT. One issue our nation has struggled with is secure universal identification for citizens. Social security numbers were not originally meant to be secure identifiers yet they have controversially been used as unique identifiers by Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for many years.

In our line of work, we see all of the potential negative implications and the important role that patient identification plays in patient safety, HIPAA compliance, and health record accuracy. When patients are not appropriately identified throughout the continuum of care, many issues arise that can lead to misdiagnosing, incomplete information, unnecessary testing, and fraud to name a few. Duplicates and overlays are far too common due to issues matching patient names and dates of birth versus using a universal secure identifier. Sharing information through health information exchange is nearly impossible when patients are registered in multiple systems with different spellings or misidentification.

The HITECH act of 2009 laid the ground work for the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to standardize unique health identifiers among other tasks but we have yet to see any real progress on this subject due to federal budget barriers. In response to this, AHIMA sees this as a critical need and has started a petition to the White House to:

“Remove the federal budget ban that prohibits the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) from participating in efforts to find a patient identification solution. We support a voluntary patient safety identifier. Accurate patient identification is critical in providing safe care, but the sharing of electronic health information is being compromised because of patient identification issues. Let’s start the conversation and find a solution.”

The campaign is called MyHealthID and looks to have 100,000 signatures on the petition to garner the attention of the US Government. HIM professionals recently took to Washington, DC to visit with Congressmen and Senators from each state to advocate for MyHealthID. The message that “there’s only one you,” hopes to resonate with politicians and make the case that a unique patient identifier is necessary and important to healthcare.

I encourage all healthcare professionals to sign this petition and assist the advocacy efforts toward a unique patient identifier. MyHealthID will not only help with HIM and Health IT initiatives; it will be in the best interest of healthcare consumers nationwide.

If you’d like to receive future HIM posts by Erin in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

Medical Record Duplicates and Overlays Impact the HIM Workflow

Posted on February 10, 2016 I Written By

Erin Head is the Director of Health Information Management (HIM) and Quality for an acute care hospital in Titusville, FL. She is a renowned speaker on a variety of healthcare and social media topics and currently serves as CCHIIM Commissioner for AHIMA. She is heavily involved in many HIM and HIT initiatives such as information governance, health data analytics, and ICD-10 advocacy. She is active on social media on Twitter @ErinHead_HIM and LinkedIn. Subscribe to Erin's latest HIM Scene posts here.

HIM professionals are responsible for many different tasks throughout the day and the highest priority is typically on ensuring the accuracy and integrity of the medical record. There are many obstacles that can threaten the integrity of medical records including accidentally creating duplicate medical record numbers or overlaying patient information in the Master Patient Index (MPI). These issues can be costly not only in productive man hours but in potential patient care delays and HIPAA violations. Monitoring these duplicates and overlays is something that must be done daily to keep records accurate and HIPAA compliant.

I was recently interviewed by John Trader for a podcast on this subject. We discussed the downstream affects of patient duplicates and overlays and how this impacts the HIM professionals’ daily workflow.

Check out this 1 minute clip from the podcast to get a taste of our discussion:

If you want to hear more, you can download the full podcast. Thanks John Trader for having me on your podcast.

If you’d like to receive future HIM posts by Erin in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

The Importance of Defining a Legal Health Record with Mary Beth Haugen, RHIA, MS

Posted on September 8, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In this interview, we sat down with Mary Beth Haugen, founder and CEO of Haugen Consulting Group, about the intricacies and challenges of the legal health record and how it’s been impacted by EHR and other healthcare technology. Plus, we give HIM leaders some firepower on how to convince hospital leadership that defining the legal health record is important for every healthcare organization. Enjoy the video below.

Should EMRs Help Patients Retrieve Medical Records?

Posted on May 21, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

As often as not, patients who need to retrieve paper medical records from hospitals go through a painful process, one which is not much easier than it was before EMRs were introduced in hospitals.

I found this out myself recently when I attempted to retrieve a medical record for one of my children from a large hospital in my metro area.  I started by reaching out to the health information management department — where it took three separate calls before I connected with a staff member.  Then I was informed that the despite the paper-free hospital environment, I would have to wait two weeks before I could lay hands on the medical record, as the staff was swamped.

This would have struck me as comical if it wasn’t such an unfortunate situation. Without HIEs in place universally across the hospital world, wouldn’t it make sense if the EMR helped produce the paper copies of records needed everywhere in a universal fashion?

Yes, I realize that EMRs are optimized for care during the hospital visit, and such is necessary to get the job done.  That being said, I could easily see using some of the technology hospitals already have in place to make EMR records retrievable by caregivers and patients.

After all, at least some hospitals already have kiosks in place that allow patients to pay bills. Couldn’t a modification of such kiosk allow patients to pay for their records fees, order the records for a given patient, sign electronically to give permission for such a printout and get the records into the mail on the back end — if not straight into their hands?

Sure, I know HIPAA issues arise when you’re trying to automate the dispensing of private health information, but at least until HIEs are everywhere, it’s a problem that needs to be handled.  After all, the reality is that patients need to carry print records all over the place to get decent care. What’s the point of urging patients to engage with their medical records data if simply retrieving hard copies of them is such an awkward chore?

I know there was some debate about this in meaningful use. Hopefully once the future stages of meaningful use are in place, getting your records from the EHR will be a much faster process than it is today.

Top HIS Vendors By 2011 Revenue: Cerner Corp. (CERN)

Posted on April 23, 2012 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

Today it’s back to our countdown of the top five HIS vendors, with data courtesy of HealthDataManagement magazine. Today we’re focusing on Cerner, which according to the magazine’s calculations ranks second for HIS sales, edged out only by McKesson.

Cerner claims to be the top EMR vendor in the U.S., despite competitor McKesson’s much larger size, since McKesson is in so many other lines of business. As with McKesson, we’re going to share a very quick overview of Cerner’s position in the overall HIS market, which as noted previously embraces not only clinical tools like EMRs, but also HIM, revenue cycle and access tools.

Cerner holds a very tasty 18 percent of the HIS market, by HDM consultants’ calculations. More interesting, to this audience at least, is that it’s gotten there with a big helping hand from its suite of EMR products. Here’s more to chew on, below.

-Anne

Cerner Corp. (CERN)
2800 Rockcreek Parkway
North Kansas City, MO 64117
Phone: 816-221-1024

Products:  For the purposes of this discussion, let’s just be cute and say “everything HIT.”  That includes its popular Millennium suite of EMR products which are really seeing a big uptake in community hospitals, especially its remote hosted solutions.

2011 HIS Revenue: $2.2 billion

2010 Revenue: $1.85 billion

Summary:  From 2010 to 2011, Cerner’s  HIS revenue grew by 20 percent as Millenium sales yielded annual revenues of $2.2 billion.  Cerner’s overall profit margin for last year was, wait for it, just about 14 percent — and over the last 52 weeks its stock is up 34.3 percent. Yeah, yeah, I’ve been an editor for 20 years but now I know I’m in the wrong business.

Interesting facts:  Cerner has a strong international presence, from Belgium to Bangladesh, the Middle East and South America. Also, it now is offering “Community Works” to Critical Access Hospitals under 25 beds (a move your editor wouldn’t have expected given the predictably high cost of solutions from a company that size).