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The Leadership Demands of Value Based Care

Posted on November 8, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Mary Sirois and Heather Haugen PhD from Atos Digital Health Solutions.

The topics of Population Health and Value Based Care continue to swirl through nearly every healthcare conversation.  Leaders across the healthcare provider and payer industries are looking for strategies to reduce costs and improve quality in hopes of improving the bottom line and increasing the viability of the organization within the community; and every vendor has a solution. We recently formed an expert panel to study and better understand the current state of work being done across healthcare provider organizations.  We explored the topics of leadership strategy and commitment, data aggregation, data analytics, and consumer engagement.  Our conversations reinforced the importance of developing a research-based approach to help healthcare leaders navigate the breadth and depth of this critical initiative: value based care.  Our findings continue to drive our work in defining solutions that meet healthcare leaders’ needs to better serve their organizational missions as care providers and employers in their communities.

The expert panelists included Zach Goodling, Director, Population Health and Care Coordination at Multicare; Randy Osteen, VP Applications, Information Management at CHRISTUS Health; and Ruth Krystopolski, SVP of Population Health at Atrium Health.

The panel discussion gave attendees the opportunity to:

  1. Understand experiences and lessons learned from industry population health and informatics leaders in preparing for value-based care opportunities to improve care quality and reduce costs in their communities
  2. Learn about approaches to data aggregation and analytics to support population health’s strategic and operational priorities
  3. Gain an understanding of various care models deployed by different organizations to manage high risk populations
  4. Appreciate the organizational culture and leadership challenges faced within each of the value-based care journeys of three different dynamic organizations

The discussion began by recognizing that the current state of healthcare is isolated and disconnected; it has interoperability challenges, misaligned incentives for employers, payers, providers, and community services; it tends to focus on sickness for an uninformed and confused user population; and it places accountability on providers that often results in duplication or even scarcity of services.

The opportunity here is tremendous!  We can find ways to:

  • Enhance the ability to improve care quality and consumer (patient, member, employee) quality of life and reduce the cost of care.
  • Come together in consumer-centric manner, using interoperable, technology-enabled, data-driven, innovative business models that cross stakeholder boundaries and focus on quality of life across the continuum of care and services, acknowledging shared risk and creating a more accountable consumer population.

Key messages from the group were enlightening and reflected the progression of the entire healthcare industry.

We heard from all three panelists about the arduous work required to make even small amounts of progress. “We have been on a five-year journey to create capabilities in population health management, managing plans to assist members, identify care gaps, and develop care plans.”  The topic of data arose throughout our interviews.  The panel discussed various concerns around data aggregation. “The biggest hurdle is aggregating data from non-affiliated places and various systems.”  “Data is vital to supporting a broad view of each patient; without it, it is very difficult.” And they cautioned organizations about relying on too much data. “When it comes to analytics, being more actionable is better than gathering more data.”

Many leaders find the array of solutions and systems available to healthcare organizations overwhelming. Our experts provided some insight on platform strategy. “Must identify consistent, reliable, scalable solutions.  It is difficult when you have too many solutions/platforms. If you can get users onto the same system, even if it is not the best of class, using the same governance model and tools creates important consistency and scale.”

The panelists had some ideas about other success factors beyond the tool set.  “Social determinants are often the biggest impact when managing a population. We joke that we are all social workers. We are putting these resources in place and able to monitor 400-450 patients with some of the highest risk patient populations.” They encouraged a paradigm shift for those setting strategy for value based care. “I am often impressed by the level of expertise in healthcare, but surprised by the lack of awareness about the macro environment.  We need to ensure we help our people understand the “why” behind the need for change. The organizational work pales in comparison to the cultural changes required to make progress.” Several panelists also reinforced the long-term focus required for value based care programs to succeed. “This is an iterative process that will evolve over time, not a program with a beginning and end.”

Key Themes from Panelists

  1. A clearly defined leadership strategy and commitment are imperative.
  2. Most organizations are still in the early stages of defining their value based care processes. They are working to improve their understanding of consumer engagement and activities that potentially influence consumers. They are exploring new ways of leveraging technologies to engage consumers and provide new models of care.
  3. The lack of interoperability makes data aggregation difficult and the application of meaningful analytics even more challenging.

A Value Based Care Model

Understanding these key themes provides healthcare leaders with a better understanding of where to focus their efforts, but they still need a model to navigate the various domains of value based care.  The model below includes five areas of consideration for healthcare leaders to use as they continue to define their value based care efforts.

  1. Leadership Strategy & Commitment: Define, refine, and commit to a strategy that allows the organization to realize the benefits of value based care. Leadership engagement is imperative and has the power to accelerate or limit the amount of progress in every domain.
  2. Data Aggregation: Compilation of disparate clinical, financial, social, supply chain, administrative, public, and consumer data is vital for supporting clinical and business decisions.
  3. Data Analytics and Business Intelligence: The ability to utilize aggregated data to make informed clinical and business decisions that improve quality, reduce costs, and offer value to consumers
  4. Models of Care: Leveraging digital technology as appropriate, selection of a care delivery model based on collaboration and communication among all health care providers, payers, consumers, and community resources that contribute to individual consumers’ health and well-being
  5. Consumer Engagement: Connection and engagement between external stakeholders (consumers) and organizations (company or brand) through various channels of correspondence. This connection can be a reaction, interaction, effect, or overall customer experience that takes place online and offline.

Maturity and Organizational Evaluation

An example of the progression in organizational competency within each dimension is shown below, focusing on the most important dimension: Leadership Strategy and Commitment.

Value based care domains establish a critical foundation for assessing progress.  Organizations can then begin to evaluate their maturity within each domain. Atos is developing an innovative algorithm to rank organizational maturity within each domain, as seen in the following chart:

This type of insight helps healthcare leaders to think more strategically about where they invest and how they prioritize the many competing initiatives that impact value based care. This strategic view often results in new operating models and elucidates new ideas, innovative approaches, and ultimately better outcomes for consumers, both inside and outside of the healthcare system.

Atos believes that the digital transformation in healthcare is facing three shockwaves:

  1. Shockwave 1: Requires leaders to rationalize and streamline existing systems, notably through real-time clinical delivery and an EHR, in addition to the integration of financial, revenue cycle, and clinical data to fully understand care quality and costs that impact overall revenue and the organization’s financial viability
  2. Shockwave 2: Interconnect and increase collaboration between all ecosystem players, notably through collaboration and digital solutions. Deeply analyze and optimize treatments with new big data and cognitive technologies for population health (achieve early detection of epidemics, discover new risk factors, uncover new treatments, etc.). This is also at the heart of the research in which Atos is participating.
  3. Shockwave 3: Leverage the latest advances in artificial intelligence, machine learning, and genomics analysis. Leverage high performance computing solutions to enable precision medicine. This is probably the most striking advance on the healthcare horizon.

It will be no small feat for organizations to navigate these shockwaves, respond to ongoing payment reform, and address a changing consumer population; it will require discipline and focus. A complete, thoughtful approach will enable healthcare organizations to move from systems of reactive, disconnected care to a global health system that supports individuals throughout their lives.

About the Authors:

  • Mary Sirois is the Vice President of Integrated Solutions Delivery, focused on population health and value-based care services and technology delivery across all of Atos’ solutions. In addition, Ms. Sirois is a member of the Atos Scientific Community.
  • Heather Haugen is the Chief Science Officer for Digital Health Solutions for Atos.
  • Inbal Vuletich serves as the editor for Atos Digital Health Solution publications.

About Atos Digital Health Solutions
Atos Digital Health Solutions helps healthcare organizations clarify business objectives while pursuing safer, more effective healthcare that manages costs and engagement across the care continuum. Our leadership team, consultants, and certified project and program managers bring years of practical and operational hospital experience to each engagement. Together, we’ll work closely with you to deliver meaningful outcomes that support your organization’s goals. Our team works shoulder-to-shoulder with your staff, sharing what we know openly. The knowledge transfer throughout the process improves skills and expertise among your team as well as ours. We support a full spectrum of products and services across the healthcare enterprise including Population Health, Value-Based Care, Security and Enterprise Business Strategy Advisory Services, Revenue Cycle Expertise, Adoption and Simulation Programs, ERP and Workforce Management, Go-Live Solutions, EHR Application Expertise, as well as Legacy and Technical Expertise. Atos is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene.

Healthcare Leaders: Feeling a Bit Discombobulated?

Posted on October 11, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Heather Haugen PhD and Inbal Vuletich from Atos Digital Health Solutions.

After passing through the security checkpoint at Milwaukee International Airport (MKE), a frazzled traveler is greeted by a low-hanging placard.  It reads: Recombobulation Area.  Clearly someone on the MKE management team with a sense of humor was acknowledging the fact that many travelers become a bit discombobulated as they proceed through security and that many probably need an area where they can get their collective psyche back in order.

The idea of a Recombobulation Area seemed especially appropriate as we returned from a healthcare conference on Lake Geneva where a wide spectrum of thought leaders presented and discussed their experiences from the past decade.  The group’s shared conclusion was that no one could have prepared for or predicted the level of change experienced in the healthcare environment over the past decade.

The changes we discussed encompass every aspect of how care is delivered, from EHRs to ERPs. Healthcare leaders navigate clinical, financial, and compliance hurdles daily – often all tangled together. Clinicians face new technologies, new workflows, new regulations and standards (that often conflict), new reimbursement requirements, new governance models, and something new… coming soon.  How can we expect better care in such a tumultuous environment?

During this time of dramatic change, it is important to identify a way to measure progress (or lack thereof) so that we can stay focused on our goals and desired outcomes.  One of the best mechanisms for assessing the impact of our work in healthcare is the use of data.  A simple research plan such as the one below can be used to assess the impact of changes – and could possibly even elucidate new ideas.

  • Research question: An overarching question to define the effort
    • For example:
      1. How effective are EHR alerts in preventing medication errors?
  • Specific aims: Specific objectives that address the overarching question
    • For example:
      1. To characterize the differences in medication errors before and after EHR implementation
      2. To understand the factors that increase alert fatigue
  • Methodology: How to address each specific goal. This step often requires some collaboration with a statistician or someone with research experience.
    • Define the sample population
    • Define the data elements to collect
    • Determine appropriate timeframes
    • Data analysis plan
  • Results: The presentation of the analyzed data
  • Conclusions: Discussion of the results and their meaning. What are the actionable steps for the organization?

Healthcare has evolved significantly to embrace new advancements in technology, but the challenges we continue to face need to be assessed objectively.  Thus far, our research has focused on the factors that influence adoption of new technology.  It has been fascinating and the outcomes caused us to consider new ideas and better approaches. Our EHR research published in Beyond Implementation remains relevant and valuable to healthcare leaders.  We are committed to helping healthcare organizations shift from the tumultuous set of ongoing changes to a research-based approach to ensure ongoing process improvement and discipline for technology adoption.  Our colleagues’ experiences, the rich research and data that exist today, and the stories of successes and challenges in healthcare organizations provide us with a critical Recombobulation Area. We must take the time to pause and learn from objective data and research methodologies to ensure that all this change focuses on improving patient care.

About the Authors:
Heather Haugen is the Chief Science Officer for Digital Health Solutions for Atos. She is also the author of Beyond Implementation: A Prescription for the Adoption of Healthcare Technology.

Inbal Vuletich serves as the editor for Atos Digital Health Solution publications.

About Atos Digital Health Solutions
Atos Digital Health Solutions helps healthcare organizations clarify business objectives while pursuing safer, more effective healthcare that manages costs and engagement across the care continuum. Our leadership team, consultants, and certified project and program managers bring years of practical and operational hospital experience to each engagement. Together, we’ll work closely with you to deliver meaningful outcomes that support your organization’s goals. Our team works shoulder-to-shoulder with your staff, sharing what we know openly. The knowledge transfer throughout the process improves skills and expertise among your team as well as ours. We support a full spectrum of products and services across the healthcare enterprise including Population Health, Value-Based Care, Security and Enterprise Business Strategy Advisory Services, Revenue Cycle Expertise, Adoption and Simulation Programs, ERP and Workforce Management, Go-Live Solutions, EHR Application Expertise, as well as Legacy and Technical Expertise. Atos is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene.

Electronic Health Records – Is Your Organization Committed to Adoption or Just Implementation?

Posted on September 13, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Heather Haugen PhD from Atos Digital Health Solutions.

Several years ago, a reputable IT vendor offered our organization a trial version of their software in exchange for our feedback. The software provided equipment monitoring that would be valuable to us. Initially, we were excited because the functionality aligned with our needs and the application was robust enough to grow with us. It seemed that the software would fulfill our need. The new software system served IT directly, so our Director of IT led the implementation and kept our senior management team updated on the progress. We were impatient to get access to the dashboard of data the vendor promised. But months later, we were still waiting.

The price tag had lured us in, but we quickly realized the high cost in maintenance and labor required to make the application truly valuable. This story drives home a concept that we all understand, but often overlook; sometimes we underestimate the “care and feeding” required to maintain a valuable investment, putting the entire project at risk. In fact, we all need to remember the importance of sustainability after the initial excitement about an investment’s value. It is common to under-appreciate the effort it will take to maintain the value of our investments.

Let’s consider the shift in thinking required to move from implementing an Electronic Health Record to maintaining high levels of adoption over the life of the application. Many organizations focus on the implementation cost without truly appreciating the long-term cost of maintaining these large, complex systems.  We often see this in healthcare organizations, no matter what size.  Costs that are often underestimated include IT resources required for system maintenance; recruiting and retaining talent for new areas; ongoing training for new employees; upgrades for resources, training, and hardware; time and resources for optimizing systems and workflow; and expertise in finance and reporting needed to gain the value promised by the EHR.

In the world of EHR adoption, we often spend too much time focusing solely on implementing new software solutions. We know how to prepare well for the go-live event, but after go-live, organizations typically discontinue the investment of time and resources required to see the process through to the adoption phase. When this happens, users tend to fall back on work-arounds and ineffective workflows, and new users receive insufficient training. The process of adoption requires a radically different discipline, where the real effort begins at go-live.

After we successfully implement a new technology, our tendency is to move on to the next project. In a world where it is common to juggle multiple projects, we actually feel some relief in moving it off our list of highest priorities. What we need is a plan to sustain the long-term changes required.  A sustainment plan addresses two important areas. First, it establishes how the organization will support the end users’ ongoing needs for the life of the application. This includes communication, education and maintenance of materials and resources. Second, it establishes how and when metrics will be collected to assess end user adoption and performance. By planning and executing a sustainment plan, we can avoid the steady deterioration in end user adoption that otherwise occurs over time.

Effective sustainability plans require resources, time, and money. Keep in mind that adoption is never static; it is continually either improving or degrading in the organization.  Without a plan for training sustainment, a series of upgrades can quickly lead to decreased proficiency among end users, completely eroding the value of the application over time. Leadership must plan for and fund the investment in sustainment because the ultimate goal is improved performance. Many organizations only achieve modest adoption levels after a go-live event. To truly achieve sustained adoption levels, it takes relentless focus on improving quality of care, patient safety, and financial outcomes. The most successful sustainability plans are part of the organization’s initial budgeting and planning stages for EHR.

Sustainment means more than maintaining the status quo. If sustainment becomes a passive process, it is a waste of resources. The difference between a highly effective sustainment plan and one that is just mediocre is metrics. Consistently measuring end-user knowledge and confidence creates a barometer for proficiency levels and provides the earliest indication of adoption, or use of the application according to best practices. Ultimately, performance metrics are powerful indicators of whether end users are improving, maintaining, or regressing in their adoption of a new system. If the warning that proficiency is slipping comes early in the process, we have an opportunity to react quickly to address the problem. Knowledge and confidence metrics ensure that the organization is progressing toward high levels of adoption, overcoming barriers, and achieving the efficiencies promised by EHR adoption.  Metrics allow us to adjust quickly and proactively; they are the first indicator of falling back into old behaviors that are inconsistent with sustainable adoption.

Metrics also keep us on track when performance does not meet expectations. Let’s consider two different scenarios to illustrate this idea. In both scenarios, the go-live event was successful, but specific performance metrics did not meet expectations. In the first scenario, the system is being used inefficiently. This may be due to inadequate training and subsequently lower end user proficiency. Measuring end user proficiency allows us to identify “pockets” of low proficiency among certain users or departments and ensure they receive the education they need to become proficient. Once users are proficient, we can refocus our attention on the performance metrics. The second scenario is less common and also more difficult to diagnose: our metrics show that users are proficient, but specific performance measurements are still not meeting expectations. In this case, we need to analyze the specific metric. Are we asking the right question? Are we collecting the right data? Are we examining a very small change in a rare occurrence? There may also be delays in achieving certain metrics, especially if the measurements are examining small changes. Normal delays can wreak havoc if we start throwing quick fixes at the problem instead of staying the course and having the confidence in the metrics that will bring about desired results.

Ultimately, leaders must commit the resources, time, and effort to adoption that lasts long after go-live ends.

About Heather Haugen
Heather Haugen is the Chief Science Officer for Digital Health Solutions for Atos. She is also the author of Beyond Implementation: A Prescription for the Adoption of Healthcare Technology.

Inbal Vuletich serves as the editor for Atos Digital Health Solution publications.

About Atos Digital Health Solutions
Atos Digital Health Solutions helps healthcare organizations clarify business objectives while pursuing safer, more effective healthcare that manages costs and engagement across the care continuum. Our leadership team, consultants, and certified project and program managers bring years of practical and operational hospital experience to each engagement. Together, we’ll work closely with you to deliver meaningful outcomes that support your organization’s goals. Our team works shoulder-to-shoulder with your staff, sharing what we know openly. The knowledge transfer throughout the process improves skills and expertise among your team as well as ours. We support a full spectrum of products and services across the healthcare enterprise including Population Health, Value-Based Care, Security and Enterprise Business Strategy Advisory Services, Revenue Cycle Expertise, Adoption and Simulation Programs, ERP and Workforce Management, Go-Live Solutions, EHR Application Expertise, as well as Legacy and Technical Expertise. Atos is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene.

Experts Tell All: How Leaders Ensure Successful Healthcare ERP Adoption

Posted on August 9, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Sallie Parkhurst, Carol Mortimer, Michelle Sanders, and Heather Haugen PhD from Atos Digital Health Solutions.

According to Gartner, approximately 75% of Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) implementations fail despite the significant opportunity for process management improvement in key business areas including human resources, payroll, supply chain management, and finance.  We gathered critical feedback from experts who have lived through hundreds of implementations across a broad spectrum of industries. Their advice was insightful!

Our discussion focused on three distinct areas where leaders should focus in order to avoid some of the common missteps of large complex implementations. That is, leaders must clearly define their strategic approach to these key business functions beyond the selection of ERP tools. This work spans the system selection and implementation phases of an ERP project. Engaging the appropriate internal experts early in the process ensures effective governance, reality in the “current state” and data accuracy.  This effort is required for the entire life cycle of an ERP.  Finally, leaders need to consider the resources, time and leadership required to continue successful adoption after implementation; this is often left until after implementation and creates significant financial surprises and resource constraints.

Clearly Defined Strategy:

  • Leadership and Communication: Most ERP systems have an impressive array of functions and options to make processes more efficient and effective. How those systems are used in your organization must be defined, communicated, and governed throughout the entire process.  The leadership team is ultimately responsible for this effort, but must consider how to best communicate and engage the entire organization to achieve the goals.  The change management effort is quite extensive and is a key predictor of success!
  • Functionality: The functionality you need should be driven based on your business needs. While this seems obvious, many organizations buy a suite of products that includes more advanced functionality than they need, functionality they can’t take advantage of because of other system constraints, or functionality that requires data from other systems they don’t have. Set the parameters for demos and consider defining the scenarios to get an accurate picture of system capabilities for your specific needs.
  • Interfaces: ERP systems can interface with many different systems ranging from clinical systems to warehouse applications. This is a great opportunity to ensure better overall integration of business processes, but don’t underestimate the work required. Ask about the cost of interfaces, maintenance required, potential impact from upgrades, and any limitations of your current systems and data specifications for accurate and efficient electronic transmission. Also, be sure to ask about any third party vendor software required during discussions involving interfaces.

Engagement of Experts:

  • Knowledge Experts: Most organizations don’t engage their internal experts early enough in the project. Involving your subject matter experts during system selection can be tricky, but it pays big dividends in the end. These experts know the current systems or manual processes, but they also know the workarounds and issues that need to be addressed. Ensure that these people are also involved in defining data tables and other “area specific” customization.
  • Document Current State: This is cumbersome work, but organizations that take the time to define their current workflows gain more efficiency and cost savings from their new ERP systems. When this step is skipped, implementations stressors (time and resources) force the new system to mimic old system processes or manual processes that degrade the overall value of the new system.
  • Competencies and Development: Your new ERP system will probably stretch your team’s competencies, and will often require additional team training. This is a great opportunity to offer growth opportunities in your organization.  It may also require hiring for specific skill sets.
  • Priorities: The toughest question a leader faces when implementing a new system is “What are we going to stop doing to ensure the success of this effort?” Give your team time to focus on and perform high quality work.

Long-Term Commitment

  • Resource commitments: Any large system capable of making dramatic improvements in efficiency and accuracy of business processes will always require an investment of time and resources after implementation. Organizations almost always underestimate the long-term investment associated with maintenance, upgrades, training, and optimization. However, organizations that commit even a few hours per week in a disciplined manner find it easy to maintain and even improve on the value they expect from their ERP.
  • Beyond implementation – achieving adoption: The difference between simply installing a system and achieving business value lies in the long-term commitment by an organization’s leaders to optimize the use of the system.

ERP tools offer a significant opportunity to better manage critical business functions, but adoption of those systems requires:

  1. A clearly defined strategy for the key ERP business functions you plan to implement;
  2. Engagement of your internal experts early and often; and
  3. Commitment of resources and funds to realize the value of your investment.

About the Authors: 

  • Sallie Parkhurst is Senior Project Manager and an expert in Finance for ERP implementations for Digital Health Solutions Consulting, Atos.
  • Carol Mortimer is Senior Consultant and an expert in Supply Chain Management for ERP implementations for Digital Health Solutions Consulting, Atos.
  • Michelle Sanders is Senior Project Manager and an expert in HR and Payroll for ERP implementations for Digital Health Solutions Consulting, Atos.
  • Heather Haugen is the Chief Science Officer for Atos Digital Health Solutions.
  • Inbal Vuletich serves as the editor for Atos Digital Health Solution publications.

What Clients Value about Atos’ ERP Solutions and Services:

  • Expertise across all ERP business functions
  • Depth of knowledge of the ERP systems and how they function in various environments
  • The combination of industry expertise and system expertise
  • Ability to solve problems and understand clients’ challenges
  • How our team cares about their problems and challenges like they are our own

About Atos Digital Health Solutions
Atos Digital Health Solutions helps healthcare organizations clarify business objectives while pursuing safer, more effective healthcare that manages costs and engagement across the care continuum. Our leadership team, consultants, and certified project and program managers bring years of practical and operational hospital experience to each engagement. Together, we’ll work closely with you to deliver meaningful outcomes that support your organization’s goals. Our team works shoulder-to-shoulder with your staff, sharing what we know openly. The knowledge transfer throughout the process improves skills and expertise among your team as well as ours. We support a full spectrum of products and services across the healthcare enterprise including Population Health, Value-Based Care, Security and Enterprise Business Strategy Advisory Services, Revenue Cycle Expertise, Adoption and Simulation Programs, ERP and Workforce Management, Go-Live Solutions, EHR Application Expertise, as well as Legacy and Technical Expertise. Atos is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene.

Driving Value in the Community: How Atos Invested In Hope TEC and Gained Business Value

Posted on July 12, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Julie Collier, Reverend Sanders, Ron Quidatano, and Heather Haugen PhD from Atos Digital Health Solutions.

Having strong technical expertise is an important competitive advantage in the field of Information Technology. While finding and retaining the right people matters for niche positions, it is also critical for entry-level IT positions.

In early 2010, Reverend (Rev.) Sanders, a senior pastor of the Hope Presbyterian Church of Chicago, met with Atos leadership (formerly ACS/Xerox), led by Chad Harris, Chad recognized the need to discuss the value of identifying resources best suited for IT training programs in the Englewood Community which was hit hard by the downturn of the economy.  With $13B of IT services, Atos deals with the impact of these resource constraints every day.  And together, Sanders and Harris discussed ways in which the tremendous resources of ATOS could be used to make a positive impact, in a community desperately in need of IT training for unemployed and underemployed residents to be lifted out of the grips of poverty.

Cook County Health & Hospitals System (CCHHS), a long-term client of Atos, was another natural partner with which to create an innovative and effective program.  Atos, CCHHS, and Hope Presbyterian Church all committed funds, resources, and leadership to the cause. They identified Chicago’s South Side as a community in need of computer and technology training for low-income residents, youth education, and job readiness preparation for adults.  In September 2010, Rev. Sanders founded Hope Technology and Education Center (Hope TEC), a not-for-profit 501(c) (3).  Atos committed funding and resources to the program, hiring Julie Collier as the Executive Director.  Julie enrolled 20 adult students in the first Beginners Computer Class; it proved to be a small start that quickly gained momentum.

Today, Hope TEC provides digital literacy, essential life skills, job readiness, job placement, and career planning for adults and youth. Julie Collier has grown the program from one Beginners Computer Class into a broad set of training programs that provide skill development from beginner to advanced levels, including Microsoft Office certifications.  The current phase of Hope TEC is leading students to job internship/job placement components. Because of the widespread success of the program, Hope TEC have a far reach and serves participants throughout the Chicagoland area.  Hope TEC serves more than 100 students annually.  Julie manages curriculum development, implementation of offerings, tracking of progress, and train-the-trainer programs. Her passion moved the program beyond just job training to job placement combined with career development, which is a unique aspect of the program.

“Hope TEC was a godsend,” says Alisha, who completed 14 weeks of training in Microsoft PowerPoint and Excel.  “Now I have the computer skills and the confidence to move forward in my job search.” Alisha earned a high score of 99 percent on the PowerPoint skills test administered by the City Colleges of Chicago, where she was hired as a Clerical Assistant.

Hope TEC has partnered with organization Easter Seals, and in the fall of 2018 will begin a partnership with Catholic Charities through their Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP).  This organization provides their hired trainees with the opportunity to train and work at Hope TEC with the ultimate goal of achieving gainful employment. These senior age adults benefit from learning and teaching new technical skill sets.

Hope TEC also provides year-round youth programs for students at the kindergarten through 8th-grade levels. During the summer months, they enroll 60+ children. Hope TEC also partners with Chicago Mayor Emmanuel’s sponsored program, called One Summer Chicago. They hire, train, and mentor more than ten young people, ages 16 through 24, to work in their youth program. The majority of the children enrolled in the summer program are from families in a low-income bracket who enroll in their school’s free lunch programs, and 85% to 90% of the children live in the community. The program is operated by adults who have professional early childhood education experience and credentials. The program consists of educational learning, such as anti-bullying and self-confidence; basic computer training; robotic programming; PowerPoint presentations; 3D printing; and extracurricular programs. They culminate the summer program with a celebratory event where students give presentations to parents and sponsors about what they have learned and receive book bags and school supplies.

Hope TEC also established a partnership with Chicago State University allowing students to serve as mentors and instructors. CSU students can perform volunteer Service Learning Hours through Hope TEC.  The students assist with the Beginners Computer Class and the youth programs.

The outcomes from Hope TEC demonstrate how innovative IT retraining programs provide value in the community and to potential employers. Hope TEC educates and empowers more than 100 adults and youth each year with computer training programs, essential life skills workshops, job readiness training programs, and a host of youth enrichment programs.

Benefits for Adult Students:

  • Utilize technical skills to compete for and secure employment or to enhance existing employment status.
  • Continue education by enrolling in Junior College to pursue an undergraduate degree.
  • Empower those who are raising children to effectively utilize computer skills, assist their children with homework, extend their overall means of communication, and conduct online transactions or business.

Many of our Hope TEC students have stated that in addition to the exceptional educational program, they also enjoy Hope TEC’s safe and genuine services that lead the way to successful individual outcomes.

Benefits for Youth Students:

  • We provide a safe, educational, and engaging environment for our school-aged children
  • We equip youth with essential to advanced computer skills, including basic Windows operations, keyboarding, internet browsing, introduction to PowerPoint, 3D Printing, and more
  • We help connect youth with summer employment opportunities.
  • Our after-school homework assistance program serves as a protective function for youth who are at risk for failing school, particularly those who do not have other structured after-school activities or those whose parents do not have the education required to assist their children.
  • We educate our students with the necessary anti-bullying and other socials skills to help them use critical thinking skills so that they can diffuse delicate situations they may encounter in everyday life.
  • We provide a place where children experience how to bolster their range of coping strategies. They master the simple challenges of learning how to follow basic instructions, create things as a team, or conquer a physical team challenges.
  • Our youth demonstrate their mastery of the complex challenges associated with getting along with new groups of peers, learning how to ask for help from others, and taking manageable risks without parental guidance.
  • We broaden our children’s horizons via field trips, exposing them to the City of Chicago, including the ComEd Youth Energy Assistance Program, Chicago’s Water Taxi ride for sightseeing through the downtown Chicago Canal, Afterschool Matter Exhibits, museums, farms, and many other exciting and educational places.
  • Our program empowers youth by giving them new skills, ideas, strategies, relationships, with their peers, as well as with trusted adults. Our youth view themselves as competent and continue to be better problem-solvers in new situations long after they leave Hope TEC.

Hope TEC is making a difference by providing essential life skills, job training, professional development, and career paths to low-income youth and adults in Chicago. The partnership between Atos, Hope Presbyterian Church, and CCHHS should be a model for other communities to support, fund, and lead similar essential initiatives.  To learn more about Hope TEC, visit us at www.hopetec.org .

“I had some experience with Word, but I had no idea Word was this in-depth,” says Ken, who completed a three-part advanced study of the Microsoft application suite at Hope TEC. “This is a great benefit that’s much needed. With all that’s going on in Englewood, Hope TEC is a blessing. It’s a blessing for Englewood. It’s a blessing for Chicago, and more people need to know about it.”  After completing the Hope TEC program, Ken was hired by SCR Transportation as a desktop support analyst.

About Hope TEC
Hope TEC dedicated to serving some of the most technologically disadvantaged communities in America. They recognize the need for accessible real-life training in inner-city neighborhoods and the need to prepare its residents in the emerging global economy. Hope TEC believes in empowering people with computer training programs, educational classes, and employment opportunities. Hope TEC’s goal is to transform individual lives, enhance family lifestyles, and impact both individuals and their neighborhoods.

About the Authors:
Julie Collier is the Executive Director of Hope TEC for Atos
Reverend Sanders, Founder, and CEO of Hope TEC
Ron Quidatano is a Director with Atos Digital Health Solutions and the CCHHS Client Executive
Heather Haugen is the Chief Science Officer for Atos Digital Health Solutions
Inbal Vuletich serves as the editor for all Atos Digital Health Solution publications

Acknowledgments:
Special thanks to Chad Harris and Atos leadership for creating the vision for Hope TEC, to Cook County Health and Hospital System, and Ron Quidatano for leading the program.  We also owe our gratitude to the Board of Hope TEC.

About Atos Digital Health Solutions
Atos Digital Health Solutions helps healthcare organizations clarify business objectives while pursuing safer, more effective healthcare that manages costs and engagement across the care continuum. Our leadership team, consultants, and certified project and program managers bring years of practical and operational hospital experience to each engagement. Together, we’ll work closely with you to deliver meaningful outcomes that support your organization’s goals. Our team works shoulder-to-shoulder with your staff, sharing what we know openly. The knowledge transfer throughout the process improves skills and expertise among your team as well as ours. We support a full spectrum of products and services across the healthcare enterprise including Population Health, Value-Based Care, Security and Enterprise Business Strategy Advisory Services, Revenue Cycle Expertise, Adoption and Simulation Programs, ERP and Workforce Management, Go-Live Solutions, EHR Application Expertise, as well as Legacy and Technical Expertise. Atos is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene.