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Finding Epic Customers

Posted on January 27, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

If you haven’t had a chance to read the Life After Epic blog, go and check it out. I’ve referenced it a few times and should probably do a whole series like they did on the 13 Epic Principles. They’ve also covered interesting topics like Epic and the Non-Compete and an Epic Severance Agreement.

I was particularly interested in the most recent post about how to find Epic customers. Once someone’s non-compete is over with Epic, it’s good to know which hospitals and organizations are available to those with Epic experience. As the owner of Healthcare IT Central, I’d be remiss if I didn’t also point you to this list of Epic Jobs. However, depending on where you live or where you’d like to live, it might be helpful to know what hospital organizations have implemented Epic.

In the article linked above, they offer an interesting way to figure this out:

One…comment on a nursing blog said this:
“you can download an app in your iphone “mychart” it will show you the states that have EPIC program”

The MyChart app is available on Android now, and it lists each organization by the state that they serve.

If it’s full time work you want, start your job search with a trip to the app store of your choice.

I like the creative way to find out where Epic is installed. I imagine that not all 100% of Epic users are on MyChart, but thanks to meaningful use I bet it’s pretty close.

Epic Salary Info

Posted on November 20, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Many of you probably remember that we helped promote an Epic Salary Survey. As promised, they’ve published the results of the survey and we thought that many readers would be interested in the Epic Salary survey results.

The survey had 753 responses. Not bad for an online survey that was promoted across various blogs and social media outlets. Although, as you can imagine, some states are better represented than others. It’s the challenge of having 50 states.

This is my favorite chart from the Epic salary survey results (you can download the full survey results and data by states here):
Average Epic Salary by Job Position

As I look at some of these salaries, I’m reminded of the doctor who said that they shouldn’t be spending time learning their EHR. The hospital CFO then told the doctor, “I’m sorry, but that Epic consultant costs a lot more than you.”

Now I’d like to see one from Meditech and Cerner.

Hospital EMR and EHR Recruiting

Posted on April 17, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Late last year, I acquired the healthcare IT career website Healthcare IT Central. Since bringing Healthcare IT Central into the Healthcare Scene family, I’ve dove head first into the healthcare IT Recruiting and career space. It’s been quite an adventure with a lot of great learning for me along the way.

What I’ve learned most is that there are some really amazing people working in healthcare IT and some really amazing companies that are trying their best to make healthcare better. There are a lot of screwed up things in healthcare, but the people are generally good people and a real pleasure to work with.

Health IT Job Seekers
If you’re in the job market and looking for a healthcare IT job, take a few minutes to register as a job seeker where you can upload your resume and apply for jobs at some of the top healthcare IT companies. Also, be sure to check out some of these popular job searches:

Of course, you can always do your own health IT job search using the criteria that matter for you. All of this is all free for the job seeker.

Health IT Employers
If you’re a health IT company or a hospital organization looking to hire qualified healthcare IT professionals, you can register and post your jobs as well. We just passed over 20,000 registered job seekers and are getting close to 11,000 active health IT focused resumes.

We also have other options available to employers like eNewsletter sponsorships (almost 16,000 email subscribers), webinars, and resume database access where you can search for specific candidates.

We’re working really hard to be an amazing health IT career resource for both job seekers and employers. If you have any feedback on the site and what we’re doing, we’d love to hear it on our contact us page.

Healthcare Generalists vs. Specialists

Posted on August 7, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The good people over at Healthcare IS have put together an interesting slide share discussing whether contractors should be generalists or specialists. You can see the slideshow embedded below:

I especially like the chart on slide 6 which shows the way a hiring manager looks at the skill profile of a possible hire. It makes a solid case for why it’s better for a contractor to specialize in one application as opposed to being a generalist that can work on all the various applications.

Of course, this is a great strategy if you choose an application that sticks around for a long time to come. However, if you’re a specialist on an EHR application that gets sunset, then you’re going to regret putting all of your eggs in one basket.

What does seem to hold true is that people who specialize get paid more. I just wonder if someone can specialize in a certain vertical category as opposed to specializing in a particular software application. If someone becomes an expert at implementing lab software across all the top lab software, that seems to be a different way to specialize, but not put your skills all in one vendors basket.

The other way to diversify your skill set is to focus on two major vendors. This way you still have deep expertise in both software systems, but you still have some diversification in case something goes south for a vendor.

The other thing to consider when thinking about being a generalist or a specialist is that most people enjoy being a generalist a lot more than being a specialist. As they say, “variety is the spice of life.” Certainly, there is a lot more to the decision of generalist vs specialist than just money. Although, I’m certain that every generalist who’s out of work would give up that “spice” for a paycheck.

Do you see this trend in your organizations? Do you want to hire the person who’s most specialized over someone who’s more of a generalist?

Epic’s Youthful Horde

Posted on July 3, 2012 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

Being the remarkably smart and talented readers that you are, I have no doubt you were particularly smart youngsters too.  I’m betting that as 20-somethings, many of you stepped up and took on difficult projects that seemed to be over your heads, persevered, and somehow got them done anyway.  Being an upwardly-mobile young pro has its place, definitely.

The question is, is that place at the heart of a multimillion-dollar EMR installation project?  Can a young man or woman with modest amounts of healthcare experience really make the right calls, time after time, required to make the EMR battleship turn on command?

Our beloved industry figurehead, Epic, has made that bet. Epic famously floods the halls of hospitals with overworked, feverishly ambitious 20-somethings who are supposed to make up in genius what they lack in long-term healthcare experience.

The experience can be bumpy.  CIOs have complained to KLAS that the hip young Epic gang doesn’t have everything it takes.  The 20-somethings, in turn, have lashed back, in one case allegedly trying to get a CIO fired who apparently wasn’t doing things their way.

If Epic can ride herd on its young hires, it can doubtless pad its profit margins substantially. Staffing up for the giant projects it takes on, and seeing them through years of growing pains, could be ludicrously expensive if if Epic insisted on only hiring grizzled HIT veterans.

Eventually, though, my prediction is that something’s gotta give. If you’re pitching yourself as the backbone of billion-dollar enterprises, there’s a limit to how long you can convince CIOs to work with consultants their childrens’ age.  What’s more, as the pace of Meaningful Use requirements picks up, hospitals will have more to lose if the cut-rate genius squad can’t cut it.

Epic does have a huge level of momentum, so it’s not going to get penalized for a while. But my guess is that at some point, a few influential CIOs are going to call Epic out on its inexperienced bench and break the spell the industry has been under.

Why Is It So Hard to Become a Certified Epic consultant?

Posted on August 30, 2011 I Written By

I often hear that when it comes to becoming Epic certified, for the most part getting the golden ticket boils down to a matter of luck. Being at the right hospital at the right time can do wonders for a career in heath IT, but some sitting on the sidelines continue to wonder why it’s so hard to break in when there’s so much demand. In the midst of a huge project to “light-up” broad swaths of our national inpatient healthcare system, why would anyone dominating an industry make it almost impossible to gain the skills necessary to manage their system without being employed by one of their customers?

It’s recognized that proprietary elements and event whole systems are used to gain a competitive advantage in many software systems. However, when the deal is won and it’s time to move on the the next project, shouldn’t it be incumbent upon a vendor to do their best to make their project successful in the least amount of time, and in the most cost effective way? Why would any vendor inhibit access to training on their system?

In the final analysis, will it be vendors that exert total control over product, product knowledge and even going so far as to controlling the customer, which creates a tipping point for a shift from proprietary systems to more open source healthcare IT?

Looking for an Epic Job or Epic Certification sponsor? Search for Epic Jobs here.