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Decommissioning Legacy EHR systems with Data Archival – Tackling EHR & EMR Transition Series

Posted on August 25, 2016 I Written By

EMR Data Archival

In their latest infographic (Check out the full infographic), Galen Healthcare Solutions provides critical information and statistics surrounding EMR data archival including:

  • Healthcare Data Growth
  • Healthcare Data Archival Drivers
    • Mergers & Acquisitions
    • Legacy System Retention Requirements
  • Healthcare Data Archival Benefits
  • Average Patient Digital Footprint
  • Industry Leading Archival Solution

Healthcare Information Technology leaders face challenges in keeping pace with new initiatives and consequently, managing a growing collection of legacy systems. With drivers including mergers & acquisitions, vendor consolidation, application dissatisfaction and product sunsets, it’s estimated that 50% of health systems are projected to be on second-generation technology by 2020, according to the IDC. As these new systems are implemented, multiple legacy systems are left behind, requiring healthcare IT staff to provide support and maintain access.

The strategy of keeping a patchwork of legacy systems running in order to maintain access to data is risky, resource intensive and can be quite costly given licensing, support, and maintenance needs. Decommissioning legacy systems with a proven archival system reduces cost and labor, minimizes risk, ensures compliance, simplifies access and consolidates data.

  • Reduce Costs: Streamlining the long-term storage of historical PHI now will save money in the long-run. Not only will it reduce costs paid for the support and technical maintenance of the legacy system, but it will also save on training new staff on the new system over the next 7-25 years. In addition, incorporating data archival efforts with a discrete data migration provides significant economies of scale.
  • Minimize Risk: Preserving historical patient data is the responsibility of every provider. As servers and operating systems age, they become more prone to data corruption or loss. The archiving of patient data to a simplified and more stable storage solution ensures long-term access to the right information when it’s needed for an audit or legal inquiry. Incorporating a data archive avoids the costly and cumbersome task of a full data conversion.
  • Ensure Compliance: Providers are required to retain data for nearly a decade or more past the date of service. In addition, the costs of producing record for e-Discovery range from $5K to $30K/ GB (Source: Minnesota Journal of Law, Science & Technology). Check with your legal counsel, HIM Director, medical society or AHIMA on medical record retention requirements that affect the facility type or practice specialty in your state.
  • Simplify Access: We all want data at the touch of a button. Gone are the days of storing historical patient printouts in a binder or inactive medical charts in a basement or storage unit. By scanning and archiving medical documents, data, and images, the information becomes immediately accessible to those who need it.
  • Consolidate Data: Decades worth of data from disparate legacy software applications is archived for immediate access via any browser-based workstation or device. Also, medical document scanning and archiving provides access to patient paper charts.

Because the decision to decommission can impact many people and departments, organizations require a well-documented plan and associated technology to ensure data integrity.

Download the full archival whitepaper to understand the drivers that impact archival scope specific to both the industry and your organization.

About Justin Campbell
Justin is Vice President, Strategy, at Galen Healthcare Solutions. He is responsible for market intelligence, segmentation, business and market development and competitive strategy. Justin has been consulting in Health IT for over 10 years, guiding clients in the implementation, integration and optimization of clinical systems. He has been on the front lines of system replacement and data migration and is passionate about advancing interoperability in healthcare and harnessing analytical insights to realize improvements in patient care. Justin can be found on Twitter at @TJustinCampbell

About Galen Healthcare Solutions
Galen Healthcare Solutions is an award-winning, #1 in KLAS healthcare IT technical & professional services and solutions company providing high-skilled, cross-platform expertise and proud sponsor of the Tackling EHR & EMR Transition Series. For over a decade, Galen has partnered with more than 300 specialty practices, hospitals, health information exchanges, health systems and integrated delivery networks to provide high-quality, expert level IT consulting services including strategy, optimization, data migration, project management, and interoperability. Galen also delivers a suite of fully integrated products that enhance, automate, and simplify the access and use of clinical patient data within those systems to improve cost-efficiency and quality outcomes. For more information, visit www.galenhealthcare.com. Connect with us on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn.

EHR Data Migration – Tackling EHR & EMR Transition Series

Posted on August 10, 2016 I Written By

EHR Data Migration
(See Full EHR Data Migration Infographic)

In this infographic, Galen Healthcare Solutions provides critical information and statistics pertaining to EHR data migration including:

  • Healthcare Data Growth
  • EHR Data Migration Drivers
    • Mergers & Acquisitions
    • System Consolidation
  • EHR Data Migration Challenges
  • Industry Leading EHR Migration Solution

The demand for data migration within the U.S. healthcare market is growing exponentially. The increase in mergers and acquisitions is driving system consolidation as is the increasing number of HCOs seeking EHR replacements to address usability and productivity concerns. A recent survey by Black Book Rankings found that nearly one-fifth of large practices and clinics intend to undergo an EHR replacement by the end of 2016. In addition, a 2015 Kalaroma report shows that the EHR replacement market will grow at an annual rate of 7-8% over the next five years.

EHR Data Migration Process

The process of migrating from one EHR to another is among the most difficult technical and functional projects a healthcare organization will ever confront. The EHR transition requires vendor selection, assessment and scoping, legacy system optimization, data migration, legacy application support, data archival, and new system implementation. If organizations fail to address any of these components properly, their migration could leave healthcare providers without the information needed to make the best patient care decisions, and organizations without easy access to the historical data necessary for participating in quality reporting initiatives and other current and emerging value based care reimbursement methodologies.

Learn more about EHR transition, replacement and migration strategies, methodologies, tips & tricks, and best practices by downloading our EHR Migration Whitepaper.

About Justin Campbell
Justin is Vice President, Strategy, at Galen Healthcare Solutions. He is responsible for market intelligence, segmentation, business and market development and competitive strategy. Justin has been consulting in Health IT for over 10 years, guiding clients in the implementation, integration and optimization of clinical systems. He has been on the front lines of system replacement and data migration and is passionate about advancing interoperability in healthcare and harnessing analytical insights to realize improvements in patient care. Justin can be found on Twitter at @TJustinCampbell

About Galen Healthcare Solutions

Galen Healthcare Solutions is an award-winning, #1 in KLAS healthcare IT technical & professional services and solutions company providing high-skilled, cross-platform expertise and proud sponsor of the Tackling EHR & EMR Transition Series. For over a decade, Galen has partnered with more than 300 specialty practices, hospitals, health information exchanges, health systems and integrated delivery networks to provide high-quality, expert level IT consulting services including strategy, optimization, data migration, project management, and interoperability. Galen also delivers a suite of fully integrated products that enhance, automate, and simplify the access and use of clinical patient data within those systems to improve cost-efficiency and quality outcomes. For more information, visit www.galenhealthcare.com. Connect with us on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn.

Another Look At Easing EMR Adoption Problems

Posted on July 22, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

Though EMRs are no longer a brand-new thing, rolling them out is still a difficult challenge for hospitals. After all, even the best platforms can require significant changes in staffers’ day-to-day work, which isn’t easy for anyone. And some less technology-savvy workers may struggle to pick up new routines. Plus, we’re still seeing a lot of EMR implementations as hospitals switch EHR vendors, EHR vendors get sunset, and hospitals get acquired by larger hospitals with different EHR.

So I was interested to read yet another take on how hospitals can survive this tumultuous period. This one comes from Next Services, an Ann Arbor, MI-based health IT software and consulting firm. Here’s some of the more interesting steps Next Services offers to help smooth out the adoption process:

  • Have managers create a 3×3 matrix sorting key players by skill and resistance. Along the top, divide the rows into high, medium and low skill sets, then along the left side, label three columns for high, medium and low resistance levels. Sorting workers into categories such as high skill/low resistance, high skill/high resistance, low skill/high resistance and so on can help managers predict what issues will arise for individual workers.
  • Roll out EMR in modules rather than phases, and don’t go to the next set of modules until you and your team are hundred percent confident that everyone can use them. Also, start with core modules that help document the basic chart, then expand outward to modules with greater functional depth.
  • Prepare staff for crises. Think through all of the ways that the rollout could go wrong during live patient care use, and make sure staffers are prepared to react appropriately when such an event happens.
  • Think of the rollout as a game. To encourage staffers, offer points for important factors such as knowledge, helpfulness and speed. Then put a chart presenting the results on a big monitor for everyone to review at the end of the day.
  • Celebrate your successes. Celebrating small wins with the staff during the rollout can help keep the atmosphere positive. Celebrations can be anything from an ice cream social to a simple group cheer.

While I find these suggestions to be interesting and useful, I’d love to see a companion list providing suggestions on how hospitals and health systems can help staffers cope with a second or third EMR rollout. My guess is that such a transition poses different management challenges than pulling the switch the very first time.

As I see it, such implementations could range from toxic (staff was exhausted by the first rollout and doesn’t want to play this time) to comparatively easy (staffers learned a lot the first time, and find additional changes to be less upsetting than they did the initial go-live). And obviously, much will depend upon how the next implementation is managed, how training is presented and how the previous rollout went.

Still, there must be ways to ease the blow regardless. What suggestions would you have for health IT leaders who are navigating their second or more EMR rollout?

EHR Implementation Infographic

Posted on April 30, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Is this EHR implementation infographic no longer needed? Or are we about to enter a new EHR switching market where EHR implementation information is going to become really important?

I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments.
EHR Implementation Infographic
Source: http://healthadmin.ohio.edu/

1/5th of Hospital EHRs are Poor Fits

Posted on April 6, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.


This is a really fascinating stat from Black Book. I’d like to dig into their methodology for this question. Defining what’s a “poor” fit is really hard when you realize that a poor fit is defined by hundreds and possibly thousands of EHR users in a hospital.

What I’ve found is that it’s really hard to make broad statements about EHR satisfaction at a hospital. The doctors may hate it, but the executives love it. The front desk may be annoyed by it, but the pharmacy is really happy. The nurses may love it…ok…I don’t think I know of any EHR that’s loved by nurses, but that’s a discussion for another blog post. Nurses often get left out in the EHR design and we’ll leave it at that for now.

With that disclaimer, let’s think about what it means that 20% of hospital EHRs are a poor fit. Does that mean that we’re going to see a wave of EHR switching in the hospital EHR world? I don’t think so.

The reason I don’t think so is that the hospital EHR is too expensive. Plus, changing EHR is so disruptive that you have to be really down on your EHR to actually switch. Sure, some of them are that down on their EHR that they’ll switch EHR. However, most of them don’t like it, but they aren’t ready to go through heart replacement surgery and take out their current EHR and replace it with a new one.

Some other factors at play is that they may not like their current EHR, but it’s the devil they know. That’s a powerful reason not to switch. Also, is there really a better alternative? Many who aren’t satisfied with their EHR aren’t convinced that switching to another EHR will be much better. Plus, many of these organizations are in the middle of meaningful use. If you switch EHR vendors in the middle of meaningful use, you might as well announce that you’ll be taking a year off from meaningful use (and all that entails…ask Intermountain).

While I don’t think we’ll see a wave of immediate EHR switching, once the renewal licenses come up, we’ll see more switching of EHR. Plus, if someone can come out with a high quality cloud based EHR for hospitals, then that could help with switching costs as well. However, until then, hospitals have mostly chosen their horse and now they have to ride it out. Of course, this assumes they don’t get acquired by a larger hospital system and are forced to switch EHR. That’s happening in a big way and is likely to continue.

Five Signs You Need a New HIE Solution

Posted on February 17, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve written a lot about the new EHR switching market. EHR implementation software has become quite mature and so we’re entering a new world where new EHR sales are going to come from hospitals switching EHR software. Yes, there are a few hospital EHR stragglers out there, but the majority of new EHR sales are going to come from switching.

While I’d seen this coming in the EHR market for a while, I hadn’t carried that over to the HIE market as well. In this case, I’m really referring to a private HIE that a hospital might employ versus a third party HIE provider. Is the HIE market in a similar “switching” market like EHR? I’d love to hear your thoughts on this.

This question came to mind when I found this eBook called, Five Signs You Need a New HIE Solution. It’s a free download if you want to check out the whole eBook. The 5 signs it suggests are worth some discussion:

  1. My data sharing solution isn’t meeting my needs, but the thought of replacing it is painful.
  2. My technology is old. We need an architectural update.
  3. I can’t access or share my data when I need to.
  4. I can’t make changes to my HIE solutions without my current vendor’s involvement. Plus, they take too long and charge too much.
  5. I don’t feel confident that my current HIE partner is well equipped to handle healthcare’s changes, challenges, and uncertainties.

It’s amazing how universal these signs are with any software. This list could have applied to EHR software as much as HIE. In the eBook, they discuss each of these in more detail. I’m sure that many of these issues resonate with readers.

As I look through this list, I wonder if switching software is the only way to solve the problem. I think in most cases the answer is that switching is the only solution. The reason many don’t switch is fear. Plus, that fear is exacerbated by colleagues from other organizations who have switched their system and not seen an improvement. That’s why so many organizations stick with The Devil You Know for much longer than they should. Hopefully the above list of signs will help people who are going through this evaluation. Just make sure that if you do need to switch HIE or other software that you take the time to make sure your new software won’t suffer the same issues.

The Changing Health IT Consulting Job Market

Posted on October 15, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Cassie Sturdevant has a great post up on Healthcare IT Today titled “The New Health IT Consulting Skill Set.” In the post, she talks about the changing Health IT market for consultants. She’s absolutely right that between 2010-2012 it was a white hot market and that the market has since cooled down. As she mentions, that means that clients can be much more selective in who their hire. Then, she outlines a few ways to differentiate yourself as a consultant:

  1. Operations or Clinical Background
  2. Communication Skills
  3. Multi-Faceted Knowledge

Those are some good suggestions and if you read the full article, you can find more details from Cassie on each suggestion. If I were to summarize Cassie’s suggestions, it would be that healthcare organizations will need someone with a much deeper knowledge of EHR and Healthcare IT than they had to have previously.

As I look at the healthcare consulting market going forward, I see two major areas of opportunities: EHR switching and EHR optimization.

EHR Switching – Since the majority of hospitals have now implemented some form of EHR, the new EHR implementation market is drying up. However, that’s not to say that we won’t see a lot of new EHR purchases. These new EHR Purchases will instead be hospitals that are buying a new EHR. This EHR switching takes a lot of effort and skills to do it properly. Plus, it takes an organization that has a deep understanding of both the legacy and new EHR software. Watch for the EHR switching to really spike post-meaningful use.

EHR Optimization – This is a really broad area of work. However, so many of the EHR implementations were done on shortened timelines that almost no EHR optimization occurred during the implementation. This presents a major opportunity. Every organization is going to be looking for ways that they can extract more value out of their EHR investment. Consultants that have deep knowledge about how to get this value will be in high demand.

It’s still an exciting time to be in healthcare IT with lots of opportunities. It’s not the gold rush that it was, but there is still plenty of opportunity to do amazing things with an organization’s healthcare IT.

If you’re looking for a healthcare IT job, be sure to check out these Health IT company job postings:

If your organization is looking for some healthcare IT talent, check out our Healthcare IT central career website.

Leveraging Vendor Neutral Archives Against EHR Vendor Lock In

Posted on October 3, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I recently heard of a new strategy that some organizations are employing to be able to avoid EHR vendor lock in. I’m happy to support anything that prevents EHR vendor lock in. The fact that a hospital can switch EHR software, doesn’t mean they will. However, the ability to switch EHR software usually means that the EHR vendor makes more effort to make sure they’re meeting the customer’s needs. This is why I think that preventing EHR lock in is so important. I don’t like EHR vendors resting on their laurels because a hospital has no choice but to use that software.

The method I heard described was a hospital who chose to implement a vendor neutral archive (VNA) of their EHR data. We usually hear VNA’s applied to radiology, but I predict over the next 3-5 years every large organization will have an EMR VNA as well. In this case, the hospital chose to implement a VNA while they were on good terms with their current EHR vendor.

Most EHR vendors won’t facilitate a VNA if you’re leaving them. So, it’s important that this is done before you choose to leave an EHR vendor. We also shouldn’t start assuming now that everyone that has a VNA is getting ready to part ways with their EHR vendor. In fact, I’d love for an EHR VNA to become the standard in the industry. That way, if and when an organization chooses to change software vendors, they can do so without losing all of the important data they’ve been collecting and storing in their EHR.

Just remember that it’s too late to employ this strategy when you’re ready to switch EHRs. It takes a forward thinking organization and investment to do this while everything is going great with your EHR vendor. Consider the investment insurance for a rainy day to come. I assure you that day will come for most healthcare organizations.

Meaningful Use Provides Hospital EHR Vendor Lock In

Posted on April 10, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of the unintended consequences of meaningful use is that it provides a real hospital EHR vendor lock in. Certainly hospital EHR vendors have a pretty significant lock in even without meaningful use. Saying that switching hospital EHR software is a large project is a supreme understatement. However, if that wasn’t lock in enough, meaningful use makes it so that I can’t imagine a single hospital switching EHR software during the 5 year meaningful use cycle.

In a Meaningful Use Monday post on EMR and HIPAA, Lynn Scheps covered the details of Switching EHR software in the middle of meaningful use. So, yes it is technically possible and CMS has covered those that do end up switching EHR software. As the meaningful use stages progress I could even see this happening relatively frequently in the ambulatory EHR arena. I don’t see this happening at all in the hospital EHR arena.

You might ask why? I can’t imagine a hospital going to the effort of reconciling the details of meaningful use between two systems. Not to mention the implementation time for a hospital EHR system is so long that you’d likely lose out on a year of meaningful use money anyway. I don’t see any hospital CIO making this choice.

I made the argument in a previous post that much like ERP software, there will be an opportunity for some EHR software to displace the current vendor. I suggested this is most likely during the renewal or upgrade period. I still think this is sound reasoning and would be the time a hospital CIO could make the case for change. Although, I’m sure that meaningful use and the EHR incentive money will likely mean that many hospital CIOs take the upgrade cost on the chin instead of switching software.

Makes me wonder if EHR vendors will use this to their advantage when it’s time to deal with renewals and upgrades. I’d hope this wouldn’t be the case, but I won’t be surprised if it happens.