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Less Than Half of Healthcare Users Trust Critical Organizational Data

Posted on November 29, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

If you’re a healthcare CIO, you must hope that your users trust and feel they can leverage data to do their jobs better. However, some of your colleagues don’t seem to be so sure. A new study has concluded that less than half of users in responding healthcare organizations have a high degree of trust in their clinical, operational or financial data.

The study, which was conducted by Dimensional Insight, surveyed 85 chief information officers and other senior health IT leaders. It asked these leaders how they rated trust in the data leveraged by their various user communities, the percentage of user population they felt was self-service oriented and making data-driven decisions, and whether they planned to increase or decrease their investments in data trust and self-service analytics.

When rating the level of data trust on a 10-point scale, just 40% of respondents rated their trust in financial data at eight or above, followed by 40% of clinical data users and 36% of operational data users.

Perhaps, then, it follows that healthcare organizations responding to the survey had low levels of self-service data use. Clinical data users had a particularly low rate of self-service use, while financial users seemed fairly likely to be accessing and using data independently.

Given these low levels of trust and self-service data usage, it’s not surprising to find out that 76% of respondents said they plan to invest in increasing their investment in improving clinical data trust, 77% their investments in improving operational data trust and 70%  their investment in financial data trust.

Also, 78% said they plan to increase their spending on self-service analytics for clinical data and 73% expect to spend more on self-service analytics for operational data. Meanwhile, while 68% plan to increase spending on financial self-service analytics, 2% actually planned to decrease the spending in this area, suggesting that this category is perhaps a bit healthier.

In summing up, the report included recommendations on creating more trust in organizational data from George Dealy, Dimensional Insight’s vice president of healthcare applications. Dealy’s suggestions include making sure that subject matter experts help to design systems providing information critical to their decision-making process, especially when it comes to clinicians. He also points out that health IT leaders could benefit from keeping key users aware of what data exists and making it easy for them to access it.

Unfortunately, there are still far too many data silos protected by jealous guardians in one department or another. While subject matter experts can design the ideal data sharing platform for their needs, there’s still a lot of control issues to address before everyone gets what they need. In other words, increasing trust is well and good, but the real task is seeing to it that the data is rich and robust when users get it.

Hospitals Still Grappling With RCM Tech Infrastructure

Posted on May 18, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

While revenue cycle management isn’t the sexiest topic on the block, hospitals need to get it right or they won’t be able to pay their bills. One key element needed to accomplish this goal is a robust tech infrastructure that helps RCM specialists get their job done.

However, it seems that many hospitals are struggling to manage RCM data and pick out the right vendors to support their efforts, according to a report published by Dimensional Insight in collaboration with HIMSS Analytics. To conduct the research, the two organizations reached out to 117 senior-level decision-makers in hospitals and health systems.

According to the survey, more than two-thirds of health systems use more than one vendor for RCM. But that might be a bad idea. The research also found that organizations using more than one RCM vendor seem to face bigger issues with denials than those using only one RCM solution. Regardless, the execs said that denials were the biggest RCM challenge for health systems today.

Pulling together RCM data is a struggle too, respondents said. More than 95% of health systems reported that the way data is collected is a challenge. Also, nearly all respondents said that collecting RCM data from disparate sources is also difficult.

One reason why it’s tough for hospitals to put effective RCM technology in place may be that health information management directors and managers aren’t at the top of the influencer list when it comes to making these decisions.

When asked who the key stakeholders were in RCM. 91.5% said that the CFO was the most important, followed by the head of revenue cycle, who was ranked as important by 62.4% of respondents. Meanwhile, only 48.7% of respondents saw the health IT leaders as key stakeholders in the RCM environment. In other words, it looks like tech leaders aren’t given much clout.

When it came to technical infrastructure for RCM, respondents were all over the map. For example, 34.5% were working with an EMR and 3+ vendors. Another 12.1% used in EMR with one vendor, followed by 11.2% with 3+ vendor solutions, 6.9% using an EMR plus two vendors and 4.3% using two to vendor solutions. Clearly, there’s no single best practice for managing RCM technology in hospitals.

Not only that, some hospitals aren’t doing much to analyze the RCM data they’ve got. According to the survey, 23.9% said that 51 to 75% of the RCM process was automated, which isn’t too bad. However, 36.8% of hospitals reported that less than 25% of the revenue cycle process was driven by analytics. Also, roughly a third of respondents said that collecting data from diverse sources was extremely challenging, which can cripple an analytics initiative.

Taken as a whole, the report data suggests that hospitals need to improve their RCM game dramatically, which includes getting a lot smarter about RCM technology. Unfortunately, it looks like it could be a long time before this happens.