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Real Interoperability and Other Micro-moments From #PCCSummit18

Posted on November 7, 2018 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

I love attending user group conferences. They are THE BEST way to get a true sense of what is on the minds of healthcare professionals. I find that people at user meetings are very open and candid. I don’t know why this happens, but I’m grateful it does.

This week, I had the privilege of attending PointClickCare’s annual #PCCSummit18 in Nashville, TN. PointClickCare is the leading EHR provider to the Long-Term and Post-Acute Care (LTPAC) space. Their customers are Skilled Nursing Facilities (SNFs), Senior Living organizations and Home Care providers.

I learned so much about the challenges facing LTPAC providers and I had so much fun connecting with PointClickCare staff as well as their customers. These are some of the memorable/notable moments from the event.

Real Interoperability happening between Hospitals and LTPAC

Interoperability wasn’t just talked about at #PCCSummit18, you could actually see it in action. PointClickCare’s partnership with Redox and their upcoming release of the Harmony interoperability module. More on this in a future article.

Investing in LTPAC Innovation Paying Off

For years PointClickCare has poured millions of dollars into R&D – researching, building, testing and in some cases acquiring new products for the LTPAC market. That investment in innovation continues to pay dividends as end-users and partners applauded each of the new modules/features unveiled at #PCCSummit18.

We’re still talking about faxes?!

The most eye-opening data point shared at #PCCSummit18 came via a real-time audience survey in one of the breakout sessions on LTPAC process optimization. The presenters asked the audience to text back their answer to the following question:

In the past 12 months, which (patient) transitions improvement projects, or remote patient reporting projects have you been a part of?

  1. Improved paper/fax processes
  2. Direct Messaging
  3. 3rd party tools
  4. None

You can see the surprising result. The majority of the audience had either not worked on any such transition improvement project or had been part of one that improved a paper/fax process. Yikes! We have a lot of work to do in #HealthIT.

Using storytelling to make data memorable

My favorite breakout session was by Doug Landis, a professionally trained actor who went onto become the chief storyteller at Box and who is now a venture capitalist. Landis’s presentation was full of useful tips and tactics on how to present data in a memorable way through the power of stories.

No single path to success

On the theme of storytelling, 4 Nashville songwriters presented their stories as the keynote session on Day 3. Each of musicians came to Nashville wanting to become the next breakout star. What happened instead is that each became a songwriter who created a piece that helped a rising star hit it big on the music charts – Carrie Underwood, Lady Antebellom and Miranda Lambert to name just a few. Their stories are proof positive that there are many roads to success and sometimes your own success can be found by helping other succeed.

Everyone leaving happy

Every attendee that I spoke with had nothing but praise for PointClickCare. They felt well taken care of, they thought the venue was fantastic, they thought the social events were incredible and they loved the food. It’s fun to be part of a conference where everyone leaves happy.

 

mHealth Apps May Create Next-Gen Interoperability Problems

Posted on November 20, 2015 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

According to a recent study by IMS Health, there were 165,000 mHealth apps available on the Google Play and iTunes app stores as of September. Of course, not all of these apps are equally popular — in fact, 40% had been downloaded less than 5,000 times — but that still leaves almost 100,000 apps attracting at least some consumer attention.

On the whole, I’m excited by these statistics. While there’s way too many health apps to consider at present, the spike in apps is a necessary part of the mobile healthcare market’s evolution. Over the next few years, clear leaders will emerge to address key mHealth functions, such as chronic care and medication management, diet and lifestyle support and health data tracking. Apps offering limited interactivity will fall off the map, those connected to biosensors will rise, IMS Health predicts.

That being said, I am concerned about how data is being managed within these apps. With providers already facing huge interoperability issues, the last thing the industry needs is the emergence of a new set of data silos. But unless something happens to guide mHealth app developers, that may be just what happens.

To be fair, health IT leaders aren’t exactly sitting around waiting for commercial app developers to share their data. While products like HealthKit exist to integrate such data, and some institutions are giving it a try, my sense is that mHealth data management isn’t a top priority for healthcare leaders just yet.

No, the talk I’ve overheard in the hallways is more geared to supporting internally-developed apps. For example, seeing to it that a diabetes management app integrates not only a patient’s self-reported blood sugar levels, but also related labs and recommended self-care appointments is enough of a challenge on its own. What’s more, with few doctors actually “prescribing” outside apps as part of their clinical routine, providers have little reason to worry about what commercial app developers do with their data.

But eventually, as top commercial health apps become more robust, the picture will change. Healthcare organizations will have compelling reasons to integrate data from outside apps, particularly if doctors begin viewing them as useful. But if providers and outside app developers aren’t adhering to shared data standards, that may not be possible.

Now, I’m not here to suggest that commercial mHealth developers are ignoring the problem of interoperability with providers. (Besides, with 165,000 apps on the market, I couldn’t say so with any authority, anyway.) I am arguing, however, that it’s already well past time for health IT leaders to begin scoping out the mobile health marketplace, and figuring out what can be done to help with data interoperability. Some sit-downs with top app developers would definitely make sense.

What I do know — as do those reading this blog — is that creating a fresh set of health data silos would be destructive. Creating and managing useful mobile health apps, as well as the data they generate, is likely to be important to next-generation health IT leaders. And avoiding the creation of a fresh set of silos may still be possible. It’s time to tackle this issue before it’s too late.

ACOs Stuck In Limbo In Trying To Build HIT Infrastructure

Posted on September 26, 2014 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

Though they try to present themselves differently, ACOs are paper tigers. While they may be bound together by the toughest contracts an army of lawyers can devise, they really aren’t integrated in a meaningful way.

After all, the hospitals and medical groups that make up the ACO still have their own leadership, they don’t generally hold assets in common other than funds to support the ACO’s operations, and they’re definitely not in a great position to integrate technically.

So it comes as no surprise that a recent study has found that ACOs are having a hard time with interoperability and rolling out advanced health IT functions.

The study, a joint effort by Premier and the eHealth Initative, surveyed 62 ACOs. It found that 86% had an EMR, 74% had a disease registry, 58% had a clinical decision support system, and 28% had the ability to build a master patient index.

Adding advanced IT functions is prohibitively difficult for many, researchers said. Of the group, 100% said accessing external data was difficult, 95% said it was too costly, 95% cite the lack of interoperability, 90% cite the lack of funding or return on investment and 88% said integration between various EMRs and other sources of data was a barrier to interoperability.

So what you’ve got here is groups of providers who are expected to deliver efficient, coordinated care or risk financial penalties, but don’t have the ability to track patients moving from provider to provider effectively. This is a recipe for disaster for ACOs, which are having trouble controlling risk even without the added problem of out of synch health IT systems.

By the way, if ACOs hope to make things easier by merging with some of the partners, that may not work either. The FTC — the government’s antitrust watchdog — has begun to take a hard look at many hospital and physician mergers. While hospitals say that they are acquiring their peers to meet care coordination goals, the FTC isn’t buying it, arguing that doctors and hospitals can generally achieve the benefits of coordinated care without a full merger.

This leaves ACOs in a very difficult position. If they risk the FTC’s ire by merging with other providers, but can’t achieve interoperability as separate entities, how are they going to meet the goals they are required to meet by health insurers? (I think there’s little doubt, at this point, that truly successful ACOs will have to find a way to integrate health IT systems smoothly.)  It’s an ugly situation that’s only likely to get uglier.

Massachusetts HIE Kicks Off With Golden Spikes

Posted on October 25, 2012 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

If you’re a history buff, you may know of the Golden Spike connecting the eastgoing and westgoing tracks of the First Transcontinental Railroad in 1869. It’s hard to overestimate how important that day was in the history of U.S. industry and transportation, despite the fact that it didn’t actually mark the day a seamless coast-to-coast rail network was completed.

This week, another big link-up was celebrated with ceremonial golden spikes, with some comparably high hopes attached. This one, however, was between disparate EMRs in Massachusetts, writes John Halamka, MD in Life As A Healthcare CIO:

Today we made history in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.   At 11:35am Governor Deval and his physician sent the Governor’s healthcare record from Massachusetts General Hospital to Baystate Medical Center.   It arrived and was integrated into Baystate’s Cerner medical record.

Lots of other demonstrations followed, pingponging data from hospitals to payers to physicians to the Massachusetts eHealth Collaborative (which measures quality and performs data analytics).

Among the most interesting facts Dr. Halamka noted was the list of varied EMRs that shared data, including Partners Healthcare’s LMR, eClinicalWorks, a custom payer system and self-built analytics applications.

What took place was no less than a revolutionary event, suggested Dr. Halamka:

Within seconds, we broke down silos, demonstrating that care coordination, population health, and quality analytics based on healthcare information exchange is now possible in Massachusetts.  

By the way, for those who haven’t crossed paths with the indefatigable Dr. Halamka, he’s Chief Information Officer of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. So his institution is central to this new effort (of which he’s quite justifiably proud).

My question is just how this trick was pulled off. Did the participants use the CCD format, Direct Project protocols, discrete data or something else?  Regardless of how the data’s being exchanged, it seems to me that the rest of the country should consider following suit.