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Will Remote Medical Coders Ever Return to the Hospital? – HIM Scene

Posted on November 14, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This week on the Journal of AHIMA blog, Elena Miller, Director of Coding Audit and Education at a healthcare system, posted this really fascinating question:

Will Coders Ever Return to the Office?

Elena does a good job of explaining how quickly remote work has become part of the medical coder’s life and the benefits it provides. However, she looks at large companies like IBM that are eschewing remote work and bringing their employees back to the office. It’s fair to wonder if the same thing will happen with medical coders who are requested to work from the hospital as opposed to their home.

I’d suggest that this is extremely unlikely to happen. First, I think it’s a mistake for IBM to bring everyone back to the office. Second, the reasons that IBM wants to bring everyone back to the office don’t apply to medical coders as much as it does IBM employees.

While IBM made a big splash with their announcement of bringing everyone back to their office, I think they’re going to regret this decision. They’re going to lose some of their best people who want to work remotely and that’s going to leave them in a bad place. Finding and keeping high quality people is the hardest thing to do at any company. The problem is that the most skilled people in your workforce can find a job anywhere at any time and your competitors are still offering remote work. It’s such a bad idea to lose all of these quality people by getting rid of remote work across the board.

I’m sure IBM needed to change the culture of the company where many remote workers weren’t being efficient in their work. That needs to be addressed, but banishing remote work across the board has all sorts of bad consequences. Don’t be surprised if IBM has made a bunch of exceptions for their highest performing people and if they go back on such a broad policy. A hospital or health system that does this will find the same problem and most can’t afford to lose their best medical coders who can certainly find remote coding work elsewhere if needed.

All of this said, the bigger issue is that remote coding work is quite different than most of the IBM jobs. Most IBM jobs benefit from collaboration and they’re hard to track as far as results. This is why they benefit from being in the same office with their colleagues with whom they need to collaborate and that can hold them accountable.

While medical coders certainly run into challenging cases where they benefit from collaboration, for the most part, medical coding is an individual sport. Plus, there are good ways to track coders productivity, accuracy, etc so you can hold them accountable for their work regardless of whether they’re at home or in the office. This is why I think it’s pretty unlikely that medical coders will return to the office.

Sure, there may be some edge cases where certain healthcare leaders who bring all their coders back as a way to send a message to staff. I think that’s what happened in the IBM case. However, much like I think will happen with IBM, those leaders will backtrack to remote coding soon enough. No doubt there will also be some edge cases where it makes sense to bring a specific coder back on site for training or other remediation for poor performance. Some medical coders may even request to be on site based on their own needs. However, if you can’t trust them to code remotely, my feeling is that you probably shouldn’t trust them to code at all.

Elena does make a great point in her article about remote coders not having the same opportunities to advance in their organization. Being present definitely matters if you are aspiring into leadership positions. What’s not clear to me is how many remote coders really aspire to leadership positions. Those that do seem to be doing remote coding on the side to supplement their income as they rise through the HIM leadership ranks. Maybe I’m wrong and there are a lot of remote medical coders that aspire to leadership in their organizations.

Let us know what you think in the comments and on social media @HealthcareScene. Will remote medical coders return to the office? Will remote coding hurt HIM professionals’ leadership opportunities?

Insights, Intelligence and Inspiration found at #AHIMACon18 – HIM Scene

Posted on October 15, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Beth Friedman, BSHA, RHIT.

Last month’s HIM Scene predicted important HIM insights would be gained at the 90th AHIMA Annual Convention. And this prediction certainly came true! Thousands of HIM professionals discussed changes to E&M coding, physician documentation and information security during the organization’s Miami event. HIM’s expanding role in healthcare analytics was also recognized. Half of AHIMA’s “hot topics” presentations covered data collection, analytics, sharing, structure and governance.

For example, HIM’s role in IT project management was the focus of an information-packed session led by Angela Rose, MHA, RHIA, CHPS, FAHIMA, Vice President, Implementation Services at MRO. She emphasized how enterprise-wide IT projects benefit from HIM’s knowledge of the patient’s health record, encounter data, how information is processed and where information flows. In today’s rapid IT environment, there is a myriad of new opportunities for HIM—the annual AHIMA convention casts light on them all.

Amid all the futurecasting, AHIMA attendees also received valuable insights and fundamental best-practice advice for the profession’s stalwart tasks: enterprise master person index (EMPI), clinical coding and release of information (ROI). Here are few of the highlights.

Merger Mania Brings Duplicate Data Challenges

Every healthcare merger includes strategic discussions, planning and investments focused on health IT. System consolidation can’t be avoided—and it shouldn’t be. Economies of scale are a fundamental element of merger success. However, merging multiple systems into one means merging multiple master person indexes (MPIs).

Letha Stewart, MA, RHIA, Director of Customer Relations, QuadraMed states, “It’s not uncommon to see duplicate medical record rates jump from an industry average of 8-12 percent to over 50 percent during IT system mergers due to the high volume of overlapping records that result when trying to merge records from multiple systems or domains”. As entities come together, a single, clean EMPI is fundamental for patient care, safety, billing and revenue. This is where HIM skills and know-how are essential.

Instead of leaving HIM to perform the onerous task of duplicate data cleanup after a merger and IT system consolidation, Stewart suggests a more proactive approach. Here are four quick takeaways from our meeting:

  • Identify duplicate data issues during the planning process before new systems are implemented or merged.
  • Use a probabilistic duplicate detection algorithm to find a higher number of valid duplicates and lower number of false positives.
  • Clean up each system’s MPI before IT system consolidation occurs and as implementations proceed. Be sure to allocate sufficient time for this process prior to the conversion.
  • Maintain ongoing duplicate data detection against the new enterprise patient population to prevent future issues.

Maintaining a clean MPI has always been a core HIM function—even back to the days of patient index cards and rotating metal bins. Technology in combination with merger mania has certainly upped the ante and elevated HIM’s role.

Release of Information Panel Raises Red Flags for Bad Attorney Behavior

Another traditional HIM function with nascent issues is ROI. A standing-room-only panel session raised eyebrows and concern for AHIMA attendees regarding a pervasive issue for most HIM departments: patient-directed requests.

Rita Bowen, MA, RHIA, CHPS, CHPC, SSGB, VP Privacy, Compliance and HIM Privacy, MRO, moderated the panel that included other ROI and disclosure management experts. Bowen, a healthcare privacy savant, asked how many attendees receive patient-directed requests that are actually initiated by an attorney’s office. Dozens of hands went up and the discourse began. Here’s the issue.

To avoid paying providers’ fees for record retrieval and copies, attorneys are requesting medical records for legal matters under the guise of a patient-directed request. During the session, four recommended strategies emerged:

  • Inform your state legislators of this bad attorney behavior
  • Discuss the issue with HIM peers in your area
  • Hold meetings with your OCR representative to determine the best course of action
  • Question and verify suspicious patient-directed requests to clarify and confirm the consent

Finally, no AHIMA convention would be complete without significant attention to clinical coding!

Coding Accuracy Takes Center Stage

One of the AHIMA convention’s annual traditions includes announcement of Central Learning’s annual national coding contest results. Eileen Tkacik, Vice President, Information Technology at Pena4, sponsor of the 3rd annual nationwide coding contest to measure coding accuracy, reported that inpatient coding accuracy fell slightly in 2018 compared with the 2017 results. “Average accuracy scores for inpatient ICD-10 coding hovered at 57.5 percent while outpatient coding accuracy experienced a slight bump from 41 percent in 2017 to 42.5 percent in 2018,” according to Tkacik.

While some were concerned about the results, others expected a decline as payers become more aggressive with coding denials and impose greater restrictions on coders’ ability to determine clinical justification. This is especially true for chronic conditions—another hot coding topic among AHIMA attendees.

Nena Scott, MSEd, RHIA, CCS, CCS-P, CCDS, Director of Coding Quality and Professional Development at TrustHCS, emphasized the need for accurate hierarchical condition category (HCC) code assignment for proper risk adjustment factor (RAF) scoring under value-based reimbursement. Everything physicians capture—and everything that can be coded—goes into the patient’s dashboard to impact the HCCs, which are now an important piece of the healthcare reimbursement puzzle.

Finally, Catrena Smith, CCS, CCS-P, CPCO, CPC, CIC, CPC-I, CRC, CHTS-PW, Coding Manager at KIWI-TEK, presented an informative session on the new coder’s roadmap to accuracy and compliance. She reiterated the need for compliance with coding guidelines and shared examples of whistleblower cases. In addition, Smith provided valuable pointers for newly employed clinical coders to consider:

  • Understand the important role that coders play in compliance
  • Know the fraud and abuse laws
  • Implement checks and balances to compare payer-driven code requirements to best-practice coding guidelines
  • Review the components of an effective compliance plan
  • Do not participate in fraudulent activities because coders and billers can be held civilly and/or criminally liable

Inspiration Found at the Beach and on the Dance Floor

Beyond the convention center, the educational sessions and the exhibit hall, I made time at this year’s AHIMA convention to enjoy the beach. Two power walks and a few meditation moments were the icing on my #AHIMACon18 cake this year. I intentionally found time to enjoy the warm sunshine and moonlit evening festivities including MRO’s signature event and AHIMA’s blanca party. Dressed in white, AHIMA attendees kicked up their heels to celebrate 90 years of convention fun—and think about AHIMA 2019 to be held September 14–19 in Chicago, Illinois. We’ll see you there!

About Beth Friedman
Beth Friedman is the founder and CEO of Agency Ten22, a healthcare IT marketing and public relations firm and proud sponsor of the Healthcare IT Marketing and PR Community. She started her career as a medical record coder and has been attending the AHIMA conference for over 20 years. Beth can be reached at beth@ten22pr.com.

Looking Forward to #AHIMACon18 – HIM Scene

Posted on September 19, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This weekend is the start of the AHIMA Annual Convention happening in Miami, Florida. For those not familiar with the AHIMA organization, it brings together HIM professionals from across the country. Something that I think makes AHIMA unique is that around the HIM conference are multiple days of training and certifications for HIM professionals. I’m always amazed at how much work HIM professionals have to put in to keep up with their certifications and to stay up with things like the ever-changing world of medical coding. HIM definitely doesn’t get the credit they deserve in this regard.

As I think what topics will be hot at this year’s AHIMA Annual convention, I’m most interested to hear what the HIM crowd thinks about the changes to the Physician Fee Schedule and E&M Coding. This is going to be a big deal for healthcare and medical coders are going to be the ones charged with dealing with the changes. Sure, doctors will have to change how they are documenting as well, but verifying that it was documented correctly and making sure the medical coding matches that documentation is mostly done by HIM professionals.

I’m really interested to hear what HIM professionals think about these medical coding changes. What do you think of the new time based coding options? Does this make life easier or not? Let us know what you think and what you’re hearing in the comments. The obvious part to me is that in the short term it’s not going to make medical coders’ lives easier at all. It’s just one more code they’re going to have to deal with and it doesn’t have a history of practices to support what’s acceptable or not. It’s not like these new codes are doing away with the old codes. At least I don’t think that’s how most practices are going to handle these new codes, but we’ll see. Let us know your thoughts in the comments.

Another big change that could impact HIM professionals, particularly medical coders, are the new remote monitoring and digital care coordination codes. I’ve heard a lot of people saying that these codes show some promise. However, I’m starting to hear overtures that the codes aren’t going to live up to their billing (excuse the pun). What are you seeing when it comes to the new coding for telemedicine, remote monitoring, and digital care coordination?

Outside of these two big topics, I’ll be interested to hear how HIM professionals are looking at security and privacy. It’s become a huge topic in the CIO and healthcare IT world. I wonder how much it will impact the HIM world. There’s always an interesting dance when a breach happens. The HIM world is great at understanding disclosures and HIPAA violations, but breaches often bring out a lot of different people. The reality is that when a breach occurs it needs to be all hands on deck. However, my guess is that many HIM professionals aren’t part of the discussion when a breach occurs. How’s your experience been in this regard? If you haven’t had a breach (lucky you), you should still have some policies and some drills in place to make sure you’re ready. So, you should have an idea of what HIM’s role would be in a breach.

Another trend I’ve been watching for a number of years is the push for more and more HIM professionals to be involved in things like healthcare analytics. This was highlighted by a recently published article in the Journal of AHIMA that makes the argument that all healthcare professionals need to learn data analytics. I argued something similar in this article on how HIM professionals can use Information Governance to ensure they’re heard. These are important messages that I think many in HIM are largely ignoring. It will be interesting to see how this shakes out. Those that embrace the changes will be well positioned for the future.

What other things should we be watching for from an HIM perspective? What’s keeping you up at night? What’s getting you most excited about your job? Let us know in the comments or on Twitter @HealthcareScene.

Medical Coding, Revenue Cycle Management and the EHR – HIM Scene

Posted on July 31, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It’s unfortunate, but true that very few healthcare organizations thought about the impact the EHR selection and implementation would have on things like medical coding and revenue cycle management. The later has gotten more attention after hospitals implement an EHR and then run into cash flow problems when they realize their collections have started piling up after the EHR implementation. However, it’s surprising how many coding and revenue cycle management challenges exist post EHR go live.

With this in mind, Healthcare Scene recently talked with Susan Gatehouse, CEO of Axea Solutions, at the HFMA Annual conference about how EHR impacts medical coding and revenue cycle management. She shares some great insights into the topic and some practical ideas for those dealing with these challenges. Plus, we ask Susan what thing stood out to her at the HFMA annual conference.

Check out our interview with Susan Gatehouse:

*Note: This video was originally live streamed to Facebook, so please excuse the poorer quality video and audio.

Be sure to check out all of the Healthcare Scene interviews on YouTube. If you’d like to receive future HIM posts in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

The Challenge of Medical Records Requests in the Healthcare Business Office – HIM Scene

Posted on July 10, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

While at the HFMA Annual Conference (Formerly known as ANI), Healthcare Scene was able to sit down with Kim Charland, BA, RHIT, CCS, Director of Revenue Cycle Services at MRO, to talk about some unique issues with Release of Information (ROI) coming out of the healthcare business office.

This was an issue I hadn’t thought much about previously, but it makes a lot of sense that medical billing professionals probably aren’t the best people to be handling release of information to insurance companies. Billing professionals’ goal is to get paid, not ensure that they’re doing a proper release of information to payers. Plus, most of them have billing expertise, not ROI expertise. It makes a lot of sense for the business office to involve HIM professionals with release of information expertise into the process.

To learn more about this topic and what MRO is doing to help healthcare organizations address this compliance issue, watch the video interview below with Kim Charland:

If you’d like to receive future HIM posts in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

Lessons Learned from the 2017 AHIMA Information Governance Survey – HIM Scene

Posted on May 16, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Stephanie Crabb, Co-Founder and Principal at Immersive as part of the HIM Scene series of blog posts.

The American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA) 2017 Information Governance (IG) survey follows previous surveys administered in 2014 and 2015 to identify trends and offer insights associated with the healthcare industry’s understanding and adoption of IG. The good news from the 2017 survey is that awareness of IG, at least among the 1500+ survey respondents, is high with 84.6 percent reporting that they are familiar with IG. The bad news from the survey is that 51.6 percent of those same respondents report that lack of awareness or misunderstanding of IG is a barrier (the most significant barrier reported) to IG adoption in their organizations.

Who participated?

While the 2017 survey garnered more participation from outside the health information management professional community than previous efforts, it is important to note that the majority of respondents identified themselves as health information managers (HIM-ers). AHIMA’s work to raise IG awareness and educate the healthcare industry since 2012 has been significant and is to be commended. The body of knowledge created and published and the work completed is extraordinary; it has certainly paid off with its own constituents. Perhaps the survey demonstrates that there is still work to be done with additional stakeholders or that we need to do more to demonstrate the knowledge and capabilities that HIM-ers possess to support IG efforts.

IG Adoption, Drivers and Benefits

Based on what we see, read and experience, in every sector of the industry information and the data from which it is created are at the center of nearly every strategic and tactical activity. So why the disconnect, or the slow pace of formal IG adoption? Why did only 14.8 percent of respondents report an “initiated” IG program as illustrated below? Further, why did percent of respondents report that IG is not considered a priority in their organizations?

A closer look at what respondents had to say about the barriers to IG adoption is useful. The survey offered respondents a list of commonly-cited barriers to IG adoption across all industries and asked them to select their top three, resulting in the following:

For many, the term “governance” implies bureaucracy, expense, complexity, misplaced power and control, among other negative connotations. This may offer some context for these survey results and explain, in part, the top responses.

IG is a complex discipline, no doubt. However, everyone can identify IG or IG-like work that is getting done in their organization every day; it is just not formalized, organized or recognized as such. Sadly, much of that work is buried or siloed, in part, because it is not connected to a strategic imperative where it might gain greater visibility and appreciation as an IG effort.

The data around low IG adoption are even more confusing when we look at what respondents had to say about what they think does or should drive IG efforts. The survey demonstrates that there is no shortage of compelling and meaningful drivers to spur action. While the survey did not provide respondents with the same response choice options for “drivers” and “benefits” there was a connection and association reflected in the responses to these two questions.


These responses reflect an impressive number of business units, departments and individuals–workforce and patients—that can truly be served by and through IG.

What’s Changed from 2014 to 2017?

In 2014, 43% of respondents reported that a formal IG program had been initiated compared to 14.8% of respondents in 2017. What contributes to this dramatic change? Does it reflect organization abandonment of previously initiated IG efforts? Does it reflect that respondents are more educated today so what they labeled as IG in 2014 was not really IG? This area may warrant further exploration in future survey efforts.

In 2014, respondents cited “strong agreement” with regulatory compliance (80 percent), improvement in patient care and safety (73 percent) and the need to manage and contain costs (61 percent) as the top three drivers for IG, followed by analytics and business intelligence (53 percent). Interestingly, trust and confidence in data was the lowest rated driver. In 2017, data quality and trust ranked second. Analytics and business intelligence tops the list of drivers, patient safety falls to the middle and regulatory compliance is at the very bottom of the list.

The most promising insight from the 2017 survey is that data governance (DG) is a growing priority and reality in healthcare. Thirty percent of respondents reported a “formal structure” for DG in their organization. There is still a bit of confusion between IG and DG as disciplines. DG is one of the competencies in AHIMA’s IG Adoption Model and often referenced as a sub-domain of IG in other reference models. Simply stated, data are the building blocks of information, so DG is requisite to IG. One takeaway from the survey is that healthcare organizations are progressing along a path that positions DG as a precursor to IG, rather than a component of IG.

Conclusion

While the drivers for IG seem to have shifted over the time that AHIMA has spent surveying the industry, there is a universality to the vision and expectation that healthcare wants and needs to put its data and information to work to accomplish its ambitious and complex mission. Much of AHIMA’s and its IG partners’ work to document the experiences of IG pioneers is available at IGIQ.org.

Have ideas about how we can better study the topic of IG and deliver meaningful insights to you? Please share your comments.

About Stephanie Crabb
Stephanie is Co-Founder and Principal at Immersive, a healthcare data lifecycle management company where she leads program and solution development, knowledge management and customer success. Stephanie brings 25 years of experience in the healthcare industry where she has served in program/solution development, client service and business development roles for leading firms including The Advisory Board Company, WebMD, CTG Health Solutions and CynergisTek. She has led a number of program and product launches with an emphasis on competitive differentiation, rapid adoption, client satisfaction, and strategic portfolio management.

Prior to her work at these firms Stephanie worked for a large Maternal and Child Health Bureau grantee working on the national Bright Futures and Healthy Start initiatives to develop and document best practices in the care continuum for pediatrics and infant mortality, and to inform federal and state health policy initiatives in these areas.

Stephanie holds her A.B. and A.M. from the University of Chicago. Stephanie serves as the Scholarship Chair of CNFLHIMSS, on AHIMA’s Data Analytics Practice Council and recently completed a two-year term on the Advisory Board of the Association for Executives in Healthcare Information Security (AEHIS) of CHIME.

If you’d like to receive future HIM posts in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

Coding Accuracy: Study Reveals Differences Between Domestic and Offshore Coding – HIM Scene

Posted on March 23, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Bill Wagner, CHPS, Chief Operating Officer, KIWI-TEK.

In January 2015 the ICD-10-preparation frenzy was at its peak. Healthcare provider organizations were scrambling to find coding support during the implementation and transition phases of the quickly approaching ICD-10 implementation deadline. KIWI-TEK was one of those outsourced coding companies being asked to supply experienced, qualified coders.

KIWI-TEK was valiantly trying to keep up with the burgeoning client requests for coding support. And although they had been actively recruiting for months, their coding bench was empty. For the first time in company history, KIWI-TEK decided to augment their team with additional coding resources by contracting with several offshore coding services.

By April 2016, the crunch for additional coding support was all but over. However, the appeal of lower coding costs via offshore coding support drives many healthcare executives to contract with international outsourced coding support. Interest in offshore coding remains even to this day as evidenced by Partners Healthcare recent decision to outsource medical record coding to India.

But what about coding accuracy? This question remains and HIM Directors deserve a data-driven answer.

The Study

Until now, the only information available for providers to compare outsourced domestic coding quality with offshore coding performance was anecdotal. Specific quality data had not been produced or shared. Amidst rampant questions and red flags, KIWI-TEK partnered with six hospitals and health systems to answer the coding industry’s toughest question: “Who delivers higher coding accuracy, domestic or offshore outsourced coding services?” (Be sure to check out the full study results for a more detailed answer to this question).

Each of the six participants had experience with both domestic and offshore coders for at least one year. The same onboarding, auditing, and training procedures were applied equally to all.

Code Accuracy Lower with Offshore

Across all six organizations, code accuracy was lower for the outsourced offshore coding service versus the domestic coding companies by an average of 6.5 percentage points.

Poor coding quality also increased payer denials with additional management time required to onboard, train and audit the outsourced offshore coders.

And What About the Cost?

The final results showed that, despite what seems to be a much lower hourly rate for offshore coders, the total cost is much higher when all factors are taken into consideration. These factors include:

Auditing – Offshore coders required an average of 6 more hours per coder per month of auditing due to poor accuracy results.

Denied claims – Offshore coders averaged 10 more denied claims on Inpatient and Same Day Surgery encounters per week than domestic coders. Reworking of denied claims on these patient types takes 40 minutes for each claim.

The Final Answer

Yes, there is a difference. Offshore coding is less accurate, and in the long-term, may also be more expensive.

To read detailed findings of the study, download the KIWI-TEK White Paper entitled “Is Offshore Coding Really Saving You Money”.

If you’d like to receive future HIM posts in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.  KIWI-TEK is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene.

An HIM Perspective of What Was Shared at #HIMSS18 – HIM Scene

Posted on March 9, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today is the final day of the HIMSS 2018 Annual Conference. While there are nearly 44k attendees at the conference and 1350 vendors, I didn’t meet a single HIM professional. I certainly didn’t meet all 44k attendees, but it’s safe to say that the HIM community wasn’t well represented at the HIMSS conference. It’s unfortunate because healthcare IT initiatives can really benefit from the HIM perspective.

Since many HIM professionals weren’t in attendance, I thought it would be beneficial to share some insights into trends I saw at HIMSS 2018 that could be beneficial to HIM professionals.

AI (Artificial Intelligence)
AI was the hottest topic at HIMSS 2018. It seemed like every vendor was saying that they were doing some sort of AI. Of course, many used the AI term very broadly. It included everything from simple analytics to advanced AI. In some ways, that’s corrupted the term AI, but what’s clear is that lots of companies are using data to provide insights and to automate a wide variety of healthcare work.

Another great insight I heard was that revenue cycle management and other financial areas are a great place to start with AI because they’re seen as less risky. When you’re applying AI to clinical use cases, you have to worry a lot more about being wrong. However, the consequences aren’t nearly as damaging when you’re talking about the financial side of healthcare.

Information Governance and Clean Data
At HIMSS 2018 I heard over and over the importance of having clean data. If AI was the hottest topic at HIMSS 2018, none of that AI will really matter or provide the value it should provide if the data is inaccurate and not trusted. This is why the work that HIM professionals do to ensure effective information governance is so important. It’s almost cliche to say bad data in leads to bad insights out. However, it’s cliche because it’s true. HIM needs to play an important role in making sure we have accurate data that can be trusted by AI applications and therefore the providers that receive those insights.

Texting Patients Is Not a HIPAA Violation
No doubt this will feel like news for many of you. It may even scare many HIM professionals. However, OCR Director Severino made it clear that Texting Patients is Ok. I won’t dive into the details here, but read the article by Mike Semel which outlines what was said at HIMSS 2018 in regards to texing patients.

Healthcare Chatbots
I didn’t see any healthcare chatbots that are solving HIM’s problems. However, when you look at the various healthcare chatbots out there, there’s no reason why a healthcare chatbot couldn’t do amazing things for HIM professionals. Here’s a framework for healthcare chatbots that companies should consider. What mundane tasks are well defined that could be automated by a healthcare chatbot? When you ask this question, you’ll see how chatbots are something HIM professionals should embrace. There’s a lot of mundane HIM work that could be done by a chatbot which frees them to work on the more challenging HIM issues.

Patient Access to Medical Records Is No Longer Controversial
While some specific individuals have fears related to access to medical records, it’s been proven across every type of healthcare organization that providing patients’ access to their medical records is right thing to do. The fears people have are unfounded and that patients find this extremely valuable. I heard one person say that they no longer will do visits with doctors who will not give them access to their records.

Those were some high level insights from a HIM perspective. Lots of exciting things when it comes to technology and HIM. What do you think of these changes, announcements, and trends? We’d love to hear your thoughts and perspectives in the comments.

If you’d like to receive future HIM posts in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

The Full Spectrum of Information Governance – HIM Scene

Posted on February 7, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Information governance is such an important topic across so many areas of healthcare. It impacts almost every organization and quite frankly takes the full organization to buy in to ensure proper information governance. Doing it right is going to be essential for any healthcare organization to work efficiently and effectively in the future.

While information governance impacts everyone in healthcare, I have to give credit to AHIMA and their HIM professional community for leading the way on the topic of information governance. A great illustration of this leadership is in the AHIMA Information Governance Adoption Model Competencies (IGAM):


*Thanks to HIM professional, Katherine Downing for sharing it on Twitter.

I think a lot of people that work in a hospital and healthcare system don’t recognize a lot of these areas of information governance. At least they don’t look at them from that lens.

My favorite part of this model is that it starts with creating the right information governance structure and the strategic alignment. If you don’t get the right people assigned as part of their job to work on information governance, it will never happen. Plus, if you don’t realize how information governance aligns with the organizations priorities, then you’ll fall short as well.

How far along are you in your information governance efforts? Have you incorporated all of the above elements into your information governance strategy? We’d love to hear your experiences, insights, and perspectives in the comments.

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An HIM Twitter Roundup – HIM Scene

Posted on December 13, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

For those that aren’t participating on Twitter, you’re missing out. The amount of knowledge and information that’s shared on Twitter is astounding. The problem is that many people think that Twitter is where you go to talk about yourself. Certainly, that’s an option if you want to do that, but I find that consuming information that people share on Twitter is extremely valuable.

If you’ve never done Twitter before, sign up (it’s free) and then you need to go in and follow about 50 HIM professionals and other healthcare influencers. You can start by following @healthcarescene. HIM professionals are easy to find. Just search for the term AHIMA or ICD-10 and you’ll find a lot of them to follow.

Ok, enough of the Twitter lesson. Just to show you some of the value of Twitter, here’s a quick roundup of HIM related tweets. Plus, I’ll add a little commentary of my own after each tweet.


This is becoming such an important role for HIM professionals in a healthcare organization. HIM staff can do an amazing work ensuring that the data that’s stored in an EHR or other clinical system is accurate. If the data’s wrong, then all these new data based decisions are going to be wrong.


I think upcoding stories are like an accident on the freeway. When you see one you just have to look.


I’m still chewing on this one. Looks like a lot of deep thoughts at the AHIMA Data Summit in Orlando.


The opioid epidemic is such an issue. We need everyone involved to solve it. So, it’s great to see HIM can help with the problem as well. I agree that proper documentation and EHR interoperability is a major problem that could help the opioid epidemic. It won’t solve everything, but proper EHR documentation is one important part.


This is an illustration of where healthcare is heading. So far we’ve mostly focused on data collection. Time to turn the corner and start using that data in decision making.