Free Hospital EMR and EHR Newsletter Want to receive the latest news on EMR, Meaningful Use, ARRA and Healthcare IT sent straight to your email? Join thousands of healthcare pros who subscribe to Hospital EMR and EHR for FREE!

Montefiore Health Makes Big AI Play

Posted on September 24, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

I’ve been doing a lot of research on healthcare AI applications lately. Not surprisingly, while people find the abstract issues involved to be intriguing, most would prefer to hear news of real-life projects, so I’ve been on the lookout for good examples.

One interesting case study, which appeared recently in Health IT Analytics, comes from Montefiore Health System, which has been building up its AI capabilities. Over the past three years, it has created an AI framework leveraging a data lake, infrastructure upgrades and predictive analytics algorithms. The AI is focused on addressing expensive, dangerous health issues, HIA reports.

“We have created a system that harvests every piece of data that we can possibly find, from our own EMRs and devices to patient-generated data to socio-economic data from the community,” said Parsa Mirhaji, MD, PhD, director of the Center for Health Data Innovations at Montefiore and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, who spoke with the publication.

Back in 2015, Mirhaji kicked off a project bringing semantic data lake technology to his organization. The first pilot using the technology was designed to find patients at risk of death or intubation within 48 hours. Now, clinicians can also see red flags for admitted patients with increased risk of mortality 3 to 5 days in advance.

In 2017, the health system also rolled out advanced sepsis detection tools and a respiratory failure detection algorithm called APPROVE, which identifies patients at a raised risk of prolonged ventilation up to 48 hours before onset, HIA reported.

The net result of these efforts was dubbed PALM, the Patient-centered Analytical  Learning Machine. PALM “represents a very new way of interacting with data in healthcare,” Miraji told HIA.

What makes PALM special is that it speeds up the process of collecting, curating, cleaning and accessing metadata which must be conducted before the data can be used to train AI models. In most cases, the process of collecting data for AI use is largely manual, but PALM automates this process, Miraji told the publication.

This is because the data lake and its graph repositories can find relationships between individual data elements on an on-the-fly basis. This automation lets Montefiore cut way down on labor needed to get these results. Miraji noted that ordinarily, it would take a team of data analysts, database administrators and designers to achieve this result.

PALM also benefits from a souped-up hardware architecture, which Montefiore created with help from Intel and other technology partners. The improved architecture includes the capacity for more system memory and processing power.

The final step in optimizing the PALM system was to integrate it into the health system’s clinical workflow. This seems to have been the hardest step. “I will say right away that I don’t think we have completely solved the problem of integrating analytics seamlessly into the workflow,” Miraji admitted to HIA.

Within Two Years, 20% Of Healthcare Orgs Will Be Using Blockchain

Posted on August 16, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

I don’t know about you, but to me, blockchain news seems to be all over the map. It’s like a bunch of shiny objects. Here! Look at the $199 zillion investment this blockchain company just picked up! Wow! Giant Hospital System is using blockchain to automate its cafeteria! And so on. It gets a bit tiring.

However, I’m happy to say that the latest piece of blockchain news to cross my desk seems boring (and practical) in comparison. The news is that according to a Computerworld piece, 20% of healthcare organizations should be using blockchain for operations management and patient identity by 2020, or in other words within two years. And to be clear, we’re talking about systems in day-to-day use, not pilot projects.

The stats come from a report by analyst firm IDC Health Insights, which takes a look at, obviously, blockchain use in the healthcare industry. In the report, researchers note that healthcare has been slower out of the blockchain gate than other industries for reasons that include regulatory and security concerns and blockchain resource availability. Oh, and while the story doesn’t spell this out, good ol’ conservative decision-making has played its part too.

But now things are changing. IDC predicts that in addition to supporting internal operations, blockchain could form the basis for a new health information exchange architecture. Specifically, blockchain could be used to create a mesh network capable of sharing information between stakeholders such as providers, pharmacies, insurance payers and clinical researchers, the report suggests. This architecture could be far more useful than the existing point-to-point approach HIEs use now, as it would be more flexible, more fault-tolerant and less prone to bottlenecks.

As part of the report, IDC offers some advice to healthcare organizations interested in taking on blockchain options. It includes recommendations that they:

  • See to it that any blockchain-related decisions are evidence-based and informed and that stakeholders share information about the pros and cons of blockchain interoperability freely
  • Develop a blockchain interoperability proof of concept which demonstrates how decentralized, distributed and immutable properties could make a contribution
  • Pitch the benefits of blockchain interoperability to providers and patients, letting them know that it could eliminate barriers to getting the data they need when and where they need it
  • Adopt blockchain interoperability early if at all, as this can offer benefits even prior to implementation, and gives leaders a chance to tackle concerns privately if need be

Of course, these suggestions and factoids barely scratch the surface of the blockchain discussion, which is why IDC gets $4,000 a copy for the full report. (Though I should note that the article goes into a lot more depth than I have here.)

Regardless, what came across to me from the article was nonetheless worth thinking about when kicking around possible blockchain strategies. Broadly speaking, providers should get in early, keep everyone involved (including patients and providers ), work out differences over its use privately and see to it that your rollout meets concrete needs. You may want to also read this article on 5 blockchain uses for healthcare. It may not be in places you’d have thought previously.

And now, back to silly blockchain news. I’ll let you know when another set of practical ideas shows up.

Translating from Research to Bedside

Posted on April 2, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’m increasingly interested in how we bridge the gap between research and practice in healthcare. No doubt my increased interest comes from the need to prove the value of data and technology in healthcare.

Remember that when we first started introducing EHR software into healthcare, the main goals were around billing and possibly efficiency. The former one has been a success in many aspects and the former has been a pretty big failure. However, the focus was never initially on how to improve care and the focus on billing has actually had a negative impact on care in ways that most people didn’t expect.

Now we’re seeing healthcare organizations trying to shift EHR models so that they do work to improve care. This has proven to be a challenge and it’s no doubt why many healthcare organizations are going beyond the EHR to make population health happen.

The other problem with moving into the clinical improvement space is that the bar is much higher. No one minds too much if you take risks in billing. That’s why most AI (Artificial Intelligence) is starting there as well. However, when you start dealing with the clinical aspects of healthcare, you have to take a much different approach and requires proper research of proposed ideas and methods.

Therein lies the challenge for much of the healthcare IT innovation. There’s a large gap between researchers and the bedside. This was highlighted really well by a researcher who described the challenge of translating research into medicine:

Speaker 3: The current models are not translational. We need more innovation and check out my cool data that does not address the topic.

The moderator was clearly the speaker’s past mentor as extra time was spent introducing this investigator’s novel interpretation of the topic. The introduction slide simply said NO in bold letters and the speaker launched into a TedX style talk on how these models are not translational and it is a waste of time for the Department of Defense or NIH to fund multi-team consortium to develop new relevant models. Remember, it was a panel discussion. This speaker left the panel and walked into the crowd spouting off about how translational research as it is defined would not prove useful and innovation was required to develop new therapies. In addition, replicative studies or lack of replication was moot because one can’t trust how other scientists conduct their science. As an example of innovation, studies demonstrating the effective integration of neuronal progenitor cells into the brain of a mouse model of epilepsy were shared. These studies were not done in a traumatic brain injury model, but a different model entirely. Innovative and published in a well-regarded journal, yes; translational, not likely and only time and additional studies will determine; relevant to the topic, no. Supporters of this young investigator probably called this display brave. There were no answers to be found here, only self-promotion. The presentation was not designed for discussion amongst peers, but was strategically delivered to help the investigator’s career trajectory. The song and dance number did not reflect a dedication to developing new therapies for people following a traumatic brain injury.

A successful Investigator’s Workshop speaker will address the topic using scientific data, but most importantly capture a story for the audience. Ideally, bullet points from learned experience or on which the speaker would like feedback will be shared and will foster discussion amongst the moderator, panelists, and audience members. It is an opportunity for the scientist to improve their approach as well as inform the audience.

This was an important insight to remember as we consider how to incorporate research into healthcare IT. The motivations of researchers are often not aligned with translating their research into practice. Researcher’s focus is often on career promotion, grant dollars, and publications. That’s a real disconnect between what most health IT vendors and healthcare organizations want to achieve.

Health Leaders Say Automating Patient Engagement Efforts Will Have Major Impact

Posted on March 12, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

Over the last few years, many vendors have rolled out products designed to engage patients further in their care. According to a new study, these solutions may be just the tip of the iceberg. In fact, many healthcare executives see patient-facing, engagement-enhancing technology as critical to the future of healthcare, according to a new study.

The study, by the World Business Group, focuses on technology that can link patients with care in between visits to their primary care center. Patient engagement technologies, which they call “automated care,” have the potential to bridge such gaps by providing AI-based assistance to consumers.

The survey, which was also backed by Conversa Health, drew on direct interviews and survey responses from 134 health execs. The researchers looked at how those execs viewed automated healthcare technologies, how these technologies might be used and whether respondents plan to adopt them.

Respondents were clearly very enthusiastic about these tools. Nearly all (98%) said they believed automated healthcare will be important in creating a continuous, collaborative relationship with providers. The survey also found that 87% of respondents felt that automated healthcare will be helpful in getting patients to engage with their own care.

The next step, of course, is throwing resources at the problem — and it’s happening. Seventy-nine percent of survey respondents said they expected to work on integrating automated healthcare in their organization within the next two years. Also, 44% said that they had a chief patient experience officer or other executive with an equivalent title on board within their organization. This development is fairly new, however, as 40% of these organizations said that the role has existed for two years or less.

Meanwhile, several respondents felt that automating patient healthcare could generate a positive feedback loop. Forty-nine percent of those surveyed reported that they were either integrating or have already integrated patient-generated health data, which they expect, in turn, to integrate into the patient experience efforts.

Among organizations working with patient-generated health data, 73% were gathering patient health histories, 64% treatment histories, 59% lifestyle or social data, 52% symptoms data, and 32% biometric data.

Thirty percent said they were beginning to integrate such data and collect it work effectively, 28% said they could collect some PGHD but had trouble integrating with their systems, 14% said they were just beginning to collect such data and 9% said they were not able to collect this data at all. Just 19% reported they were fully able to collect integrate PGHD and use it to improve patient experiences.

All told, it appears we’re on the cusp of a major change in the role patient services play in provider outreach. It will probably be a few more years before we have a good idea of where all this is headed, but my guess is that it’s heading somewhere useful.

#HIMSS18: Pushing Inpatient Care Out

Posted on March 9, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

At present, we need acute care hospitals. Despite the fact that many types of care can now be delivered in outpatient settings, and chronic conditions managed remotely for connected health, there are still some treatments and procedures which can only be done in a big, expensive building.

That being said, some of what I saw at HIMSS18 has convinced me that the drive to push hospital-type services into the community has begun to pick up speed. While nobody seems to have a completely mature solution to decentralizing acute care, I saw some tools that might begin to solve the problem.

Perhaps the most direct example of this trend was offered by a Taiwanese company called Quanta Computer. (The booth was staffed with five company representatives who had flown here all the way from Taiwan, which may suggest that they are not fooling around.)

Quanta was here to pitch QOCA, whose capabilities include offering a “smart hospital at home.”  QOCA Home, an eldercare/assisted living solution including a central, easy to use terminal supporting a wide range of telehealth and connected health services. While the idea is not completely new, the way this blends a smart home approach with connected health intrigued me.

Other vendors took a different approach to some of the same core problems, i.e. managing the patient effectively outside of the hospital. For most exhibitors, this seemed to involve a blend of connected health, care management and patient/provider collaboration.

For example, vendor Virtual Health promises to deliver “whole person health” by tying together providers, healthcare execs, patients and care coordinators. Two points of interest: its solution include a collaborative workflow tool which seems to include patients, something I don’t believe I’ve seen before. Its platform, which is designed to support patients with highly complex medical needs, also addresses social determinants of health, including financial concerns and nutrition.

Now, I’m not here to tell you that any of this is revolutionary. The industry has been kicking around concepts like virtual hospital care, care coordination platforms and the integration of social determinants of health for quite some time, and I’m not suggesting that any of the vendors I saw seem to be all the way there.

Still, what I saw suggests to me that tech vendors are further along in delivering these options than they have been. If you haven’t looked into new platforms that address these issues, now might be the time. They may not be completely ready for prime time, but they’re well on their way.

ACO Proves Major Political Turning Point For Boston Hospital Chain

Posted on January 2, 2012 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

Transforming a hospital system into a fully-functioning ACO is a huge project, and one which requires a big commitment.  It’s hardly surprising that going through the process would change how its leaders think about their business.  But the following is the first case I’ve heard of in which a hospital system made a major break with its peers over its ACO status.

Apparently,  for-profit Steward Health Care System has just resigned from the Massachusetts Hospital Association, bringing its 10 hospitals (and 11 percent of the MHA’s revenues) with it.  Steward, which was created by the acquisition of six-hospital Caritas Christi Health Care Chain a year ago by VCs, has since picked up four hospitals and done a host of doctor deals.

Not surprisingly, Steward seems to have bruised some competitors’ feelings along the path to ACO-hood, which probably has something to do with its MHA departure, but Steward isn’t copping to that of course.

At this point in its evolution, Steward’s leaders say, the MHA’s positions on politics don’t represent its needs anymore. Particularly when it comes to health reform, Steward’s leaders feel it now has a different take than other members of the MHA, which has to advocate for shared positions across almost 100 hospitals with varied approaches.

As for me, I’m not sure what those differences are; in fact, I’d think that a “real” ACO would be an inspiration for, and partner to, other hospitals on the path to health reform.  In fact, this raises some questions as to how the growing ACO trend will affect hospital relationships this year:

* Are IDNs that work hard at building a true ACO going to upset their peers so much that it will create a drag on their business overall?

* Most healthcare business models have some detractors and some fans, but is this one of the few that can actually divide the industry?

*  Are ACOs a direction every IDN can take, or are there resource constraints (such as the size of a local market or number of unaffiliated doctors) that will prevent some from building one? Will the coming rush create ACO “haves” and “have nots”?

What do you think, folks?  Have you seen anything happening in your markets that might answer these questions?

FTC: This Merger Looks So Good, It Has To Be Illegal

Posted on August 29, 2011 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

If you’re as cynical as I am, it’s not hard to take a certain amusement in the goings-on in Toledo over the merger between an aggressive for-profit hospital chain and a suburban not-for-profit.

Over the past few months, the Federal Trade Commission seems to have developed a passionate interest in the merger between a formerly Lutheran-owned non-profit, St. Luke’s Hospital of Maumee, OH and ProMedica Health System of Toledo. ProMedica, which owns 11 hospitals in Ohio and Michigan — including four in the Toledo metro — is a swaggering giant with $1.7 billion in annual revenue.

What a sweet deal it was for ProMedica. According to Moody’s, the facility had very little debt ($8.3 million) and 412 percent cash-to-debt coverage as of November 30, 2009 (recently enough to matter).

Sure, as of early 2010 St. Luke’s had an operating cash flow deficiency of -2.0 percent and -9.8 percent operating margin, and at least according to Moody’s, had cut some cut-rate contracts with payors accounting for 22 percent of its operating revenues.

On the other hand, its miserably weak competitive market position which, as Moody’s noted in its downgrade report, included clashes with ProMedica, went away with the stroke of a pen when the two consummated their agreement. ProMedica sweeps in with its Aa3-rated borrowing capacity, invests a relatively slim $35 million and picks up the 10 percent market share SLH held at the time. I don’t know what 10 percent of the market is worth, but that has to be a fire sale.

Dig this if you can, cats and kittens:  According to the FTC,  the deal increases ProMedica’s market share in Toledo to 58 percent of inpatient services and (get this) 80 percent of high-margin inpatient OB services. Wow… Small wonder the FTC smells a rat.

Of course, in the sort of excess of confidence you always see in these deals, ProMedica’s executives are pretending the deal was good for the public and stuff.  I don’t know about you, but I find the following comment (made by ProMedica CEO Randy Oostra to the New York Times) to be preposterous:

“We could coordinate care,” Mr. Oostra said. “We could improve quality at St. Luke’s by adopting electronic health records and using clinical protocols to standardize the delivery of care. But the F.T.C. has stopped us in our tracks.” 

OK, let me get this straight, Mr. Oostra. You could only connect with St. Luke’s by buying it and forcing your EHR down its throat (after all, we know you’re not going to put St. Luke’s on Cerner if you use Epic)? You’re buying a hospital with tremendous upside largely because you think you can standardize care — because that will, of course, increase effectiveness and lower prices?  Oh, and as far as sharing data and coordinating care: have you ever heard of a health information network? Or an Accountable Care Organization?

Really, sir, if you want to impress the FTC with the public benefits of your transaction, you’re going to have to try a little harder. If you’re already phoning it in, to the Times no less, you’re not just arrogant, you’re stupid.

Another safety-net hospital on life support: Miami’s Jackson Memorial on its last legs?

Posted on August 22, 2011 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

You know, no matter many how many times  you watch it happen, it’s always an ugly spectacle.

When a safety-net hospital goes under because, well, being a safety net costs a ton, the poor are left with less than nothing. Worse, along the way, the hospital often slips from being an inelegant but functional resource to a nasty, scary place you wouldn’t send your worst enemy.

I was truly sorry to read that Jackson Memorial Hospital of Miami — a sprawling, 1,550-bed campus which still houses outstanding programs like the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute and the Ryder Trauma Center — seems to be moving rapidly from quick to dead.

The giant public entity, which serves as the primary teaching hospital for the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, has faced plenty of controversy of its time, including accusations that some of its poor clientele were allowed to die for lack of followup care. That, of course, is an extremely serious matter.

But for most of its life, Jackson did at least offer the roughly 650,000 uninsured of Miami-Dade county an alternative to going into hock in the pricey EDs run by its competitors. It went through a colorful string of outspoken leaders, none of which seemed to share the same vision for the place, faced lawsuits and immigration issues and politics galore, but continued to stay afloat.

Those days, it seems, are over. According to a recent Miami Herald article, the Jackson Health System lost $337 million over two years, despite taking in $350 million a year from sales and property tax revenue alone.

This week, the system announced that it was hiring new leaders to step into the top administrative roles at JHS.  But in a system where its own employees refuse to get their care on site, I get the feeling that “changing deck chairs on the Titanic” covers things. What a shame.

Hospital EMR actually works

Posted on June 4, 2011 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

As some of you may know — if you read the EMRandEHR.com blog — I recently had an experience which set a fine example as to how much health IT can help hospitals when deployed well and supported by smart training. In short, a family member just had an effective, focused trip through a hugely busy ED, largely due, I believe to the technology it uses.

The hospital has deployed the Picis electronic document management system, along, seemingly, with traffic control modules, to strip much of the fat away from a patient’s trip through the ED.

With staff clicking away happily, patients moving in and out promptly and physicians having easy access to patient histories, med lists test results and more in one easy-to-access place, I saw a pretty neat ballet in place.

The truth is, however, that this seems to be an exception rather than the rule. Far more  hospitals I’ve visited seem to have taken a heavy-handed, training-light approach to introducing their EMR.  (One facility had installed screensavers on staff desktops that read “Cerner is coming.” I can’t imagine this gave any employees a big thrill, or helped them get prepared.)

Actually, when I passed through the same facility later, I saw flustered-looking nurses trying desperately to get simple transactions done, forming an insecure cluster together as they tried to help a colleague enter some observations. Thaaaat didn’t give me a nice, secure feeling about the hospital’s odds of making clinical mistakes.

I hate to say this, but I think the odds of a hospital IT department changing its culture enough to truly support EMR users is pretty darned small. My guess is that it will take several years before hospitals have a clue as to how to handle the big, huge change management process their EMR produces. Good luck, guys.

 

Hospital merger mania on the rise across the U.S.

Posted on April 30, 2011 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

As I reported a few days ago, hospital mergers and acquisitions hit a historic high last year.  This is shaping up to be a pretty frenzied year for hospital M&A as well.  In fact, this may be the year that hospitals see a historic change in how they’re managed and they define themselves.

How much merger activity will we see?  At the HIMSS11 event earlier this year, John Reiboldt of Coker Capital Advisers suggested that the single stand-alone hospital may be a “concept of the past.”

While the comment by Reiboldt may have been a bit tongue-in-cheek, it’s clear that many smaller hospitals and health systems are giving up long-held independence in an effort to survive.

What’s more, such deals seem to be getting a friendlier reception from the Department of Justice and the FTC, which revised its Horizontal Merger Guidelines in August of last year.

A few randomly chosen examples of regional mergers underway:

* The merger between Albany-based  St. Peter’s Health Care Services, Northeast Health and Seton Health/St. Mary’s Hospital is should close shortly.  After three years of talks, the three entities have gotten the FTC’s blessing to move ahead.

*Alongside of its massive effort to acquire Tenet, Community Health Systems has signed a definitive agreement to acquire Mercy Health Partners, a three-hospital system based in northern Pennsylvania.

* Peoria, IL-based OSF Healthcare may absorb Rockford (IL)  Healthcare System, despite some degree of public hostility to the proposal (and complaints from rival SwedishAmerican Health System.

I see no reason why this consolidation should slow down this year, particularly as reform deadlines grow closer. And I fully anticipate that hospital mergers will create a ripple effect that tips other industries into new formers of cooperation.  Fasten your seat belts — this year is proving to be a wild ride.