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Hospital Mobile Device Initiatives Can Improve Patient Satisfaction

Posted on April 17, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

Without a doubt, hospitals have many reasons to implement mobile technology, which can offer everything from improved communications to logistical support. But the benefits of these rollouts may offer more than operational benefits. At least according to data gathered by the following survey, hospital mobile initiatives almost always improve patient experience and satisfaction.

The study, conducted by Vanson Bourne on behalf of Apple-based mobile device management company Jamf, draws on a survey of 600 global healthcare IT decision-makers based in the US, the Netherlands, France, Germany and the United Kingdom. Respondents worked in both private and public healthcare organizations.

Researchers found that 96% of healthcare IT decision-makers currently implementing a mobile device initiative felt that it had a positive impact on patient experiences and satisfaction. Also, 32% reported that they saw a significant increase in patient experience scores.

The survey also found that among institutions currently implementing or planning to implement a mobile device initiative, the devices are most likely used in nurses stations (72%), administrative offices (63%) and patient rooms (56%). In addition, survey participants anticipate that mobile device use will expand to both clinical care teams (59%) and administrative staff (54%). What’s more, 47% of respondents said they plan to increase mobile device use in their institution of the next two years.

To exert better control over these efforts, hospitals can leverage a mobile device management solution. However, the survey found that only 48% of healthcare IT decision-makers had full confidence in their MDM solution’s capacity to do its job. That’s down from 59% in 2016.

Also, as data sharing increases via mobile devices and apps, data security becomes even more important. However, many health IT leaders aren’t sure they can pull this off. Their biggest challenges included data privacy (54%), security/compliance (51%) and keeping software properly patched (40%).

But they don’t think MDM tools can solve the problem. Ninety-five percent of respondents said their current MDM solution could stand to offer better security options, and almost a third (31%) of respondents thinking about mobile device initiatives were holding off because they weren’t sure they could secure the devices adequately.

Unfortunately, the health IT world seems to have made little progress in securing mobile devices over the past year. In a similar Jamf study conducted last year, 88% of respondents were concerned about managing security, data privacy (77%) and blocking inappropriate employee use (49%).

TigerConnect Successfully Rebrands in Just 9 Months

Posted on April 16, 2018 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

Rebranding is not easy. Rebranding a well-established company that has become synonymous with a form of healthcare communication is even harder. Executing that rebrand in just 9 months while simultaneously preparing for healthcare’s biggest event – the annual HIMSS conference – is a near impossible task. Yet that’s what the team at TigerText, now TigerConnect, pulled off earlier this year.

At HIMSS18, TigerText became TigerConnect. Along with the new name came a new logo – albeit one with a clear homage to their company’s past. The new logo features a cleaner font style and a clever graphic element. If you look closely you will see that the graphic is four interlocking C’s which represent the company’s goal – Connected, Clinical, Communications, and Collaboration. The four colors are meant to represent the four different members of the care team: Doctors, Nurses, Allied Health Professionals, and Patients.

“The old brand was really about texting and compliance,” explained Kelli Castellano, Chief Marketing Officer for TigerConnect. “Not only was the word ‘text’ front and center, but our old brand also had a text box with a lock symbol as the main graphic. You couldn’t get more literal than that. When we first started, we were focused on being the best secure texting and compliance solution in the market. We sold to healthcare compliance officers and to CIOs. The TigerText brand personified that focus and it really served us well.”

But then in 2016, the company launched a new clinical workflow solution called TigerFlow.

“When we showed TigerFlow to prospects it was well received,” Castellano continued. “But people would leave the meeting wondering why their texting company was talking to them about clinical workflow. Worse, many clinicians were confused on being invited to a meeting with TigerText – a company they viewed as a technology infrastructure provider.”

By early 2017, after a few months of research and introspection, the team realized that the company name and brand was holding them back. It was simply too much to ask their target audience, which now included clinical decision makers like CMOs, CMIOs and CNOs, to see the company as anything more than a texting platform.

Castellano and the rest of the Marketing Team knew that rebranding the company would be risky. After all, hundreds of thousands of users click the TigerText logo each day on their phones to communicate securely with their peers. “TigerTexting” had even become a verb used by their customers to describe the act of sending messages through their system.

To gain buy-in and build internal momentum for a rebrand, Castellano asked her team to “do the research” and gather feedback from stakeholders including: customers, board advisors, partners and staff. They found there was consensus for changing the TigerText name.

After three months of work, Castellano and her team, with the support of Co-Founder and CEO, Brad Brooks, officially began the rebranding initiative.

It was now the end of spring 2017 and Castellano set an ambitious goal of launching the new brand at HIMSS18 – only 9 months away. “It was definitely an audacious goal,” admitted Castellano. “But we all knew that it just had to get done. Our Sales Team needed it. Our company needed it. We just had to move forward.”

Castellano allocated half of her ten person team to work on the rebrand while the other half worked on HIMSS18 pre-show marketing and building up their sales funnel. Everything came together and on March 6th the new brand was revealed.

CEO Brooks explained the new name this way: “Our new name – TigerConnect – allows us to clearly articulate the true value our solutions deliver. We connect care teams, existing data systems, and ultimately healthcare communities across a centralized and highly scalable clinical messaging platform. It is this real-time connection to data and people that dramatically improves the way healthcare organizations communicate to drive better results. We wanted that value to be reflected in our name and brand icon which are 4 interlocking C’s that represent Connected Clinical Communication and Collaboration.”

According to Castellano the reaction internally has been overwhelmingly positive. “We gave our staff a preview of the new brand in January. Everyone was very proud and happy with the new name. It was fresh and new, yet it still had a nod to our heritage and roots. Everyone felt that the new brand would allow us to better position the company and elevate the conversations we were having.”

“The reaction at HIMSS was also very positive,” noted Brooks. “The name change gave us the opportunity to talk about our story. We talked about where we had been and where we were going. It was really a lightbulb moment for visitors to the booth. We got a lot of ‘Aha…that makes sense’ comments.”

Having led three rebranding initiatives at three different companies, I applaud Castellano and her team for achieving their goal in such a short time frame. To do it on top of preparing for HIMSS is simply incredible.

It will be interesting to track the growth of TigerConnect in the years to come to see if the rebrand helps the company reach its desired financial results.

Are We Going About Population Health The Wrong Way?

Posted on March 29, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

For most of us, the essence population health management is focusing on patients who have already experienced serious adverse health events. But what if that doesn’t work? At least one writer suggests that though it may seem counterintuitive, the best way to reduce needless admissions and other costly problems is to focus on patients identified by predictive health data rather than “gut feelings” or chasing frequent flyers.

Shantanu Phatakwala, managing director of research and development for Evolent Health, argues that focusing on particularly sick patients won’t reduce costs nearly as much as hospital leaders expect, as their assumptions don’t withstand statistical scrutiny.

Today, physicians and care management teams typically target patients with a standard set of characteristics, including recent acute events, signs of health and stability such as recent inpatient admissions and chronic conditions such as diabetes, COPD and heart disease. These metrics come from a treatment mindset rather than a predictive one, according to Phatakwala.

This approach may make sense intellectually, but in reality, it may not have the desired effect. “The reality is that patients who have already had major acute events tend to stabilize, and their future utilization is not as high,” he writes. Meanwhile, health leaders are missing the chance to prevent serious illness in an almost completely different cohort of patients.

To illustrate his point, he tells the story of a commercial entity managing 19,000 lives which began a population health management project. In the beginning, health leaders worked with the data science team, which identified 353 people whose behavior suggested that they were headed for trouble.

The entity then focused its efforts on 253 of the targeted cohort for short-term personal attention, including both personal goals (such as walking their daughter down the aisle at her wedding later that year) and health goals (such as losing 25 pounds). Care managers and nurses helped them develop plans to achieve these goals through self-management.

Meanwhile, the care team overrode data analytics recommendations regarding the remaining 100 patients and did not offer them specialized care interventions during the six-month program.  Lo and behold, care for the patients who didn’t get enrolled in health management programs cost 75% more than for patients who were targeted, at a total cost of $1.4 million. Whew!

None of this is to suggest that intuition is useless. However, this case illustrates the need for trusting data over intuition in some situations. As Phatakwala notes, this can call for a leap of faith, as on the surface it makes more sense to focus on patients who are already sick. But until clinicians feel comfortable working with predictive analytics data, health systems may never achieve the population health management results they seek, he contends. And he seems to have a good point.

Putting into Practice Today’s Innovative Technologies that Enable Healthcare Disruption

Posted on March 28, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As we went around the #HIMSS18 annual conference in Las Vegas, we were in search of practical innovations that hospitals and health systems could implement today. We found that in spades when we visited the Lenovo Health booth and had a chance to sit down with experts from Lenovo Health, Wyatt Yelverton and Andy Nieto.

Today’s healthcare demands organizations look for innovations and efficiencies that will help them thrive in a value based healthcare world. In the following video interview with Wyatt Yelverton and Andy Nieto from Lenovo Health, I talk with them about a wide variety of subjects and technology including: AR/VR, telehealth, and smart assistants. Along with seeing the technology, we talk about how health IT professionals can get buy in for these technologies and the impact these technologies will have on their organization.

If you’re interested in some of these practical IT innovations, you’ll enjoy this interview with two Lenovo Health experts.

What are you doing in your organization around these technologies? Are you using AR/VR, Telemedicine, or smart assistants? What have you done to get buy in from your organization to implement these technologies? If you haven’t implemented them, what’s holding you back? We look forward to hearing your thoughts on social media and in the comments.

Disclosure: Lenovo Health is a sponsor of Healthcare Scene.

Shared Use Smartphones in Healthcare: Apple Losing Market Share to Healthcare Specific Devices

Posted on March 14, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Just before HIMSS took over my healthcare IT world, KLAS published a report on clinical mobility that I found extremely interesting. In fact, the report shaped a number of meetings I did at HIMSS. If you’re a provider or payer you can access the report for free here. However, I got permission to share a few images from the report that showed some trends worth considering when it comes to clinical mobility.

The first image is trends in shared-use smartphones in healthcare organizations.

This chart is quite fascinating as you see a big shift away from Apple devices and a big increase in the healthcare specific mobile devices like Zebra and Spectralink. Granted, Apple still has a good size market share and is still being considered by many. However, it seems that many are realizing that the Apple devices aren’t worth the premium you pay for them.

At HIMSS, I had a chance to talk with both Zebra and Spectralink and I was impressed by their efforts to make a healthcare specific mobile device. These were extremely robust devices and so it’s no wonder to me that they’re seeing good adoption in healthcare.

I’ll be continuing to watch this space to see how it evolves.

Another chart from the clinical mobility report that caught my eye was this list of most desired capabilities:

There’s no surprise that secure messaging was so high. I was a little surprised that video connections was so low. Shows you how far we have to go. Secure messaging does seem to be the gateway drug to mobile clinical devices, but I’m most excited by the other smart notifications that are going to be available. When meeting with Voalte at HIMSS I was impressed by one of their user’s observations that managing alert fatigue was easier with a unified platform. That made a lot of sense to me and it is a challenge that every healthcare organization faces.

What stands out for you in the above charts? What’s your experience with clinical mobility? I look forward to hearing your thoughts in the comments.

E-Patient Update:  Patients And Families Need Reassurance During EMR Rollouts

Posted on March 5, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

Sure, EMR rollouts are stressful for hospital staffers and clinicians. No matter how well you plan, there will still be some gritted teeth and slammed keyboards as they get used to the new system. Some will afraid that they can’t get their job done right and live in fear of making a clinical mistake. All that said, if your rollout is gradual and careful, and your training process is thorough, it’s likely everyone will adjust to the new platform quickly.

The thing is, these preparations leave out two very important groups: patients and their families. What’s more, the problem is widespread. As a chronically ill patient, I visit more hospitals than most people, and I’ve never seen any effective communication that educates patients about the role of the EMR in their care. I particularly remember one otherwise excellent hospital that decorated its walls with asinine posters reading “Epic is here!” I can’t see how that could possibly help staff members make the transition, much less patients and family members.

This has got to change. Hospital IT will always be evolving, but when patients are swept up in and confused by these changes, it distorts everything that’s important in healthcare.

Needless fear

A recent experience my mother had exemplifies this problem. She has been keeping watch over my brother Joseph, who is critically ill with the flu and in an induced coma. For the first few days, as my brother gradually improved, my mother felt very satisfied with the way the clinical staff was handling his case.

Not long after, however, someone informed her that the hospital’s new Epic system was being deployed that day. Apparently, nobody explained what that really meant for her or my brother, and she felt that the ICU nurses and doctors were moving a bit more slowly during the first day or two of the launch. I wasn’t there, but I suspect that she was right.

Of course, if things go well, over the long run the Epic system will fade into the background and have no importance to patients and their families. But that day or two when the rollout came and staff seemed a bit preoccupied, it scared the heck out of her.

Keeping patients in the loop

Don’t get me wrong: I understand why this hospital didn’t do more to educate and reassure my mother. I suspect administrators wouldn’t know how to go about it, and probably feel they don’t they have time to do it. The idea is foreign. After all, communicating with patients about enterprise health IT certainly isn’t standard operating procedure.

But isn’t it time to involve patients in the game? I’m not just talking about consumer-facing technology, but any technology that could reasonably affect their experience and sense of comfort with the care they’re receiving.

Yes, educating patients and families about enterprise IT changes that affect them is probably out of most health IT leaders’ comfort zones. But truthfully, that’s no excuse for inaction. Launching an Epic system isn’t inside-baseball process — it affects everyone who visits the hospital. Come on, folks, let’s get this right.

#HIMSS18 Preview with David Chou

Posted on February 28, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

If you subscribe to the full Healthcare Scene email list, then you probably know that for the past month we’ve been prepping for the massive HIMSS Annual Conference happening next week in Las Vegas. It’s a great place for the healthcare IT community to come together and hear what’s happening in the industry and connect with vendors. If you’re planning to go, please come and say hi at one of the Healthcare Scene Meetups at #HIMSS18.

It’s always fun to sit down before HIMSS and talk about what we expect to see at the show and what we expect not to see at the show. Then, we can go back after and see if we were right and talk about any things that surprised us. With that in mind, David Chou, Vice President and Chief Information and Digital Officer at Children’s Mercy Kansas City, and I decided it would be the perfect topic for this week’s CXO Scene podcast.

If you’re going to HIMSS18, then you’ll really enjoy the video below, but even if you won’t be making the trek to Vegas, we cover a lot of topics that you might want to consider exploring in your organization if you’re not doing so already. Plus, we offer a few tips in how to make the most of HIMSS.

If you can’t make it to HIMSS or want to experience a healthcare IT focused event that’s much more intimate, take a minute to check out Health IT Expo. Health IT Expo is a conference focused on practical innovations in healthcare IT.

See everyone next week at HIMSS in Las Vegas!

Are You Still Doing the Happy Dance for Your EHR?

Posted on February 16, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today I stumbled upon this video from 6 years ago with Flagler Hospital celebrating the implementation and launch of the Allscripts EMR in their organization. Here’s the video in case you’ve never seen it:

We’ve written previously about the value of these videos bringing the team at your hospital together. Any big project such as an EHR implementation is a challenging thing and it’s important to get your whole team involved and to have some fun in the process.

At the end of the video they hold up a sign that says Good Bye Paper. 6 years later, I wonder how they feel about this video and their EHR implementation. Would they still be doing the happy dance? Could they make another video celebrating their EHR?

I know a few organizations where they could. They’ve implemented the EHR effectively and are happy with how it works. Sure, they still have things they’d like changed, updated, modified, etc. However, they’re generally happy to be on an EHR over paper charts. Plus, there’s a whole generation of doctors now that don’t know the paper charts world and know no difference.

Unfortunately, there are many other hospitals that are cursing their EHR software. They might do a video about their EHR, but it would be a satire video about the challenges they still face using an EHR.

Where are you at with your EHR? Are you doing a happy dance or are you disappointed, frustrated, or upset with having to use an EHR in your hospital? Share your thoughts in the comments.

How Mobile Computer Carts Reduce Errors and Increase Efficiency

Posted on February 2, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Andy Lurie, Director of Marketing and Partner Relations at Add On Data.

Mobile computing carts have been a mainstay in the hospital environment since the electronic medical records (EMR) mandate took effect in the United States. To show meaningful use of electronic health records in the healthcare environment, facilities across the nation have adopted mobile computing carts as the primary means of addressing EMR at the point-of-care. Mobile carts offer better ergonomics and productivity than tablets or mobile devices.

Mobile computer carts aren’t just a means of satisfying the new meaningful use requirements for EMR however, they’re becoming vital aspects of workflow optimization and error reduction strategies at healthcare facilities everywhere. Hospitals that initially overlooked the practical benefits of satisfying the EMR mandate are now benefiting from fewer recording errors in patient records, more accurate medication administration, and enhanced worker productivity. Keep reading to find out how!

Mobile Computer Carts Help Care Providers Get More Done

It’s easy to imagine how the introduction of mobile workstations to the healthcare environment has enhanced productivity, especially for the nurses and physicians that use this equipment daily. Here’s what a workflow for patient visits might have looked like before the introduction of mobile workstations:

  1. The nurse visits the patient’s room.
  2. The nurse interviews the patient and conducts any relevant assessments (blood pressure, vitals, etc.)
  3. The nurse visits the medication/equipment room to get materials needed by the patient.
  4. The nurse returns to the patient and administers treatments.
  5. The nurse returns to the stationary workstation located at the nurse’s station.
  6. The nurse records the patient’s condition and documents the treatment provided.
  7. The nurse is ready to visit a new patient.

With mobile computer carts, nurses can reduce many of the walking steps in this process. Basic medical supplies and medications can be stored securely in the drawers of a mobile computing cart, reducing the need for trips to supply rooms. The nurse can also update patient records at the bedside, eliminating the need to repeatedly return to a stationary workstation throughout their shift. A 10-20% reduction in the time taken for a patient visit represents massive productivity gains for an organization.

Mobile Computer Carts Reduce Errors in EMR Recording

EMR recording errors are an insidious and completely unnecessary cause of adverse outcomes for the patient, but they’re a sad reality of an inefficient workflow that separates the processes of patient care from the process of documentation.

We all trust our healthcare providers to provide attentive and conscientious care for each patient, but it’s easy to imagine how documentation errors can occur. Nurses who routine to a stationary workstation between patient visits may sometimes find that computer occupied, meaning they have to wait before documenting the most recent interaction. Sometimes nurses encounter distractions on their way to document a patient interaction – it could be a medical emergency, an urgent request from another staff member, a disruptive patient or visitor, or anything else.

Nurses and physicians need to be accountable for accurately documenting every interaction they have with patients, and this is best achieved with mobile computer carts. Mobile carts ensure the presence of an available workstation at the point of care, ensuring that patient care is documented as it happens and without delay. This reduces data entry errors and enhances patient safety.

Mobile Computer Carts Help Ensure Secure and Accurate Medicine Administration

Mobile computer carts have been used effectively to ensure the security, accuracy, and timeliness of medication administration in hospitals. Carts can be customized with secure drawers for holding medication, as well as bar-code scanners that nurses use to correctly identify patients and match them with the appropriate medications. The combination of medication verification software and organized storage of patient medications virtually eliminates the possibility of patient medication errors.

A study that assessed adverse drug events (ADEs) found that each hospital experiences a medication error every 22.7 hours and every 19.73 admissions. Miscommunication and “Human Factors” have been identified as leading factors contributing to these mistakes, along with similar labeling on medications and patient name confusion. Using bar-code scanners and software to match patients with their proper medications reduces these errors and ultimately saves lives by addressing sources of error that are inherent to the manual administration of medicines in the hospital setting.

Conclusion

While the implementation of mobile computer carts in the healthcare environment is important for satisfying the EMR mandate, hospitals should not overlook the real opportunities to generate and capitalize on the other benefits of mobile carts. Effective usage of mobile computing carts reduces errors and increases hospital efficiency, helping facilities reduce their costs and improve patient safety and health outcomes.

The 4 P’s of Innovation in Health Science

Posted on January 31, 2018 I Written By

Sunny is a serial entrepreneur on a mission to improve quality of care through data science. Sunny’s last venture docBeat, a healthcare care coordination platform, was successfully acquired by Vocera communications. Sunny has an impressive track record of Strategy, Business Development, Innovation and Execution in the Healthcare, Casino Entertainment, Retail and Gaming verticals. Sunny is the Co-Chair for the Las Vegas Chapter of Akshaya Patra foundation (www.foodforeducation.org) since 2010.

You’ll never meet anyone that loves health data science more than Prashant Natarajan. He literally wrote the book on the subject (Check out Demystifying Big Data and Machine Learning for Healthcare to see why I mean literally). He recently gave a presentation on the 4 P’s of Innovation in Health Science which included this slide:

Sadly, I couldn’t find a recording of his presentation. However, this slide puts health data science in perspective. Prashant boiled it down to 4 simple points. The problem is that too many healthcare organizations are unable to really execute all 4 P’s in their health science innovation efforts.

No doubt each of these 4 P’s is challenging, but the most challenging one I see today is the first P: People.

I’m not sure all of the ways that Prashant addresses the people problem, but it’s somewhat ironic that people is the biggest problem with health science innovation. I see the challenge as two fold. First, finding people who have the health science mindset are hard to find. Competition for people with these skills is fierce and many of them don’t want to get into healthcare which is complex, regulated, and often behind.

The second major health science challenge revolves around the people who collect, aggregate, and enter the data. It’s easy for a front line person to not care about the downstream effects of them entering poor quality data. Not to mention being consistent in what you enter and how you enter it.

It’s somewhat apart of human nature for us to jimmy rig a solution to the problem we face. Those workaround solutions wreaked havoc downstream in your data science efforts. I recently heard the example of a hospital always choosing Mongolian for some setting because it was a setting that would never be used otherwise. The culture of the hospital just knew this is what to do. Once the data scientists started looking at the data they wondered why this Mongolian population kept coming up in their results. Every healthcare organization has their “mongolian” workaround that causes havoc on data science.

What do you think of these 4 Ps of Innovation in Health Science? Is there something missing? Do you see one of these as more important than another?