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Centralizing HIM Operations: An Enterprise Approach

Posted on August 15, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Patty Sheridan, MBA, RHIA, FAHIMA; SVP, Life Sciences at Ciox.

Technological advances, policy changes and organizational restructures are continuously bringing trends to the healthcare industry, specifically impacting healthcare facilities. Centralization of operations is one of those trends. Driven by a value-based model, the centralization of health information management (HIM) aims to streamline operations, standardize processes, reduce costs and improve quality of care and patient satisfaction.

Oftentimes, HIM departments operate with disparate processes due to legacy standard processes and acquisitions of new entities and are unable to efficiently integrate and access information when it is derived from multiple sources. This causes inconsistencies in processes and procedures, as well as incompleteness of information and unavoidable redundancies. Furthermore, decentralization can result in risks such as ineffective information management, inaccurate coding and breaches.

Silos of information hinder standardization, and as a result create compartmentalized pockets of information from sources, slowing down communication and making change more difficult. However, through the use of electronic HIM technology, secure information can be shared and processed across various departments and facilities at a quicker pace than ever before. Taking these efficiencies one step further, instead of siloes of information, many organizations are moving to a centralized model that can reduce operational costs by streamlining organizational performance, establishing consistent processes through standardization and eliminating redundancies.

Patient health information must be linked across the healthcare continuum to provide the best quality of care. Additionally, sources of information must be linked to electronic health records (EHRs) to support centralization and enhance patient care. To connect silos and reduce risks, healthcare facilities must centralize HIM operations to create standardization and improve coordination across the continuum of care.

Benefits of Centralization

Healthcare facilities can greatly benefit from incorporating the centralization of HIM operations into their long-term organizational plans. In fact, the benefits are greater than any hurdles encountered during the transition. Benefits include:

  1. Improves operational efficiency: Moving from a fragmented system to a model that streamlines operations improves efficiency and decreases administrative and operational costs.
  2. Eliminates redundancies and reduces errors: Helps to standardize processes, procedures and forms across a healthcare system to ensure they are the same throughout facilities.
  3. Improves financial performance: Restructuring improves productivity and efficiency as resources are centrally located, which positively impacts the bottom line.
  4. Fosters collaboration: Eliminates silos of communication that cause a stagger in the flow of information – improving communications and optimizing patient outcomes.
  5. Increases accessibility: Provides the benefit of system-wide accessibility to patient information for release purposes, such as billing and coding.
  6. Optimizes workflow: Allows opportunities to reexamine workflows for optimal efficiencies across the HIM continuum, bringing business value.

Driving Transition Towards Centralization

When an organization transitions to centralized HIM operations, it’s important that the journey be completed with the right preparation and execution. HIM professionals must establish processes that foster opportunities for consolidation and standardization that then result in reduced cost, mitigation of risk and overall improved patient care.

Prior to implementing a centralized model, HIM professionals must take certain steps into consideration:

  • Acquire an executive sponsorship to provide direction, support, budget and resolution to potential problems that may arise during the transition.
  • Establish a multidisciplinary steering committee to address centralization and your organization’s information policy, aligning resources with strategy.
  • Identify challenges, gaps, risks and opportunities while working with collaborators to achieve goals for improvements.
  • Define and establish standards, processes and procedures.

Centralization: The Decision is Yours

It is important for HIM professionals to be proactive when determining his or her organization’s vulnerabilities and address them immediately, as breaking down barriers that add risk ultimately drives down costs and improves efficiencies.

Additionally, everyone in an organization may not support the transition. However, executive sponsorship and collaboration between staff, departments and facilities is essential. To gain consensus, HIM professionals must understand the culture of the departments involved and how to leverage their individual technological capabilities.

The work of healthcare professionals is being reshaped by the centralization of HIM operations. If you’re looking to succeed during this ambiguity of change, transforming HIM to a centralized model throughout an enterprise provides healthcare facilities with a competitive advantage, as the integration of emerging technology continues to become a crucial step towards efficient, successful operations.

About Ciox
Ciox is a health technology company working to solve the clinical data illiquidity challenge by providing transparency across the healthcare ecosystem and helping clients manage disparate medical records and is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene. When stakeholders do not have timely access to the complete clinical picture of patients, critical decisions about patient care, medical outcomes research, disease prevention, reimbursement, and payments are sub-optimized. Ciox’s scale, expertise, expansive provider network and industry leading technology platform make it the most reliable clinical data company in the US. Through its standards based technology platform, HealthSource, Ciox helps clients securely and consistently solve the last mile challenges in clinical interoperability.  Learn more about Ciox’s technology and solutions by visiting www.ciox.com

HCCs: An Operational Perspective – HIM Scene

Posted on August 8, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Cathy Brownfield, MSHI, RHIA, CCS, Chief Operating Officer, TrustHCS.

Hierarchical Condition Categories (HCCs) were mandated by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) in 1997. In 2003 HCCs were selected as a risk adjustment model to be used to determine reimbursement for Medicare Advantage Plans.  They describe chronic condition diagnoses for patients and are determined from other codes assigned during physician encounters—including ICD-10 codes, CPT codes and medication codes.

The HCC framework is progressively being applied to numerous healthcare reimbursement reform initiatives. As the shift from volume to value advances, so does the importance of accurate HCC coding. This month’s blog explains the correlation between HCC coding and value- based reimbursement.

Two HCC models prevail

There are two HCC models in use by the federal government: CMS-HCC and HHS-HCC. Both models employ a risk adjustment score to predict future healthcare costs for plan enrollees. They operate within a hierarchical structure in which the more complex diagnoses absorb and incorporate less complex, chronic conditions.

The CMS-HCC model addresses a predominantly elderly population (65 years and over) and includes more than 9,000 ICD-10 codes that map to 79 HCC codes; these numbers do change and will increase slightly in FY 2019.

The Department of Health and Human Services (HSS) maintains the HHS-HCC model, which addresses commercial payer populations and covers all ages. This system incorporates CPT and medication codes and is currently comprised of 128 HCC codes.

Relationship to risk adjusted payment programs

The following are some of the risk adjusted payment programs currently using HCCs to determine reimbursement:

  • MA – Medicare Advantage Plan
  • MSSP – Medicare Shared Savings Program (ACO)
  • CPC+ – Comprehensive Primary Care Plus (Medical Home Model)
  • Commercial – Mainly the ACA

Each of the models primarily use ICD-10 codes taken from claims data to identify individuals with serious or chronic illnesses and assign a risk factor score to each enrollee based upon a combination of the individual’s health conditions and demographic details. Each HCC has a risk factor, an individual can have multiple HCC’s and those factors add up to their overall risk adjustment factor.

According to the CMS website, “risk adjustment allows CMS to pay plans for the risk of the beneficiaries they enroll, instead of an average amount for Medicare beneficiaries. By risk adjusting plan payments, CMS is able to make appropriate and accurate payments for enrollees with differences in expected costs. Risk adjustment is used to adjust bidding and payment based on the health status and demographic characteristics of an enrollee. Risk scores measure individual beneficiaries’ relative risk and risk scores are used to adjust payments for each beneficiary’s expected expenditures. By risk adjusting plan bids, CMS is able to use standardized bids as base payments to plans.”

How to operationalize accurate HCC coding

The risk-adjustment data for these programs is based on active diagnoses. In order to ensure the information is accurate, providers must conduct face-to-face encounters with their patients and all pertinent diagnoses must be documented in the medical record on an annual basis. Accurate documentation and coding is paramount to proper reimbursement under risk adjusted programs that use HCCs.  Beyond accurate HCC coding, it is important for HIM professionals to be aware of CMS reporting and data collection methodologies when operationalizing HCCs.

Reporting considerations to know

In 2012, CMS began transitioning the Medicare Advantage Organizations (MAOs) data collection method from its original format to an Encounter Data Payment System (EDS). The data collected under the EDS is unfiltered and more detailed than EDS’s predecessor, Risk Adjustment Payment System (RAPS). While CMS has gone back and forth on which algorithm to use, a blend of 85 percent RAPS and 15 percent EDS scores is currently in place for 2018.

Data is submitted directly to CMS where filtering logic is applied to extract the valid diagnosis codes from the data. The codes are then used in the risk score calculation process. With this process, MAOs must verify the completeness and accuracy of the data submitted to CMS to ensure that all appropriate diagnosis codes have been accepted for risk adjustment by CMS.

The RAPS/EDS blend will return to a 75/25 split in 2019. Additionally, CMS is proposing to calculate the EDS risk scores amended with RAPS inpatient diagnoses. Other 2019 changes are listed below.

2019 CMS-HCC Model Changes

  • Behavioral Health Conditions
    • HCC 55 Drug/Alcohol Dependence: Add opioid (and other substances) overdose ICD-10 diagnosis codes to HCC 55
    • Add HCC 56 Drug Abuse, Uncomplicated, Excluding Cannabis, includes opioid dependence diagnoses (among other narcotics)
  • Mental Health and Substance Abuse Disorders
    • Add HCC 59 Reactive and Unspecified Psychosis
    • Add HCC 60 Personality Disorders
  • Add HCC 138, Chronic Kidney Disease Stage 3 (Moderate Only)

Role of HIM and where to learn more about HCCs

In the new frontier of value-based payment, HIM is the purveyor of accurate coding and HCC assignment for organizations and providers. Savvy HIM leaders ensure they have the most up-to-date information by monitoring the following websites and information sources:

About Cathy Brownfield
Cathy Brownfield is the Chief Operating Officer of TrustHCS. She holds over 17 years of operations, auditing and coding experience. Prior to TrustHCS, Cathy served as the Operations Director for HealthPort’s Coding Operations division overseeing scheduling, billing, and quality assurance efforts.

Cathy holds her Master of Science in Health Informatics from Arkansas Tech University. She received her Bachelor of Science in Health Information Management from the same university. Cathy is a Registered Health Information Administrator and a Certified Coding Specialist. As a member of the American Health Information Management Association she volunteers on the Coding Community Council and also the PPE work group.

Healthcare AI Adoption Curve – Where Is Your Hospital At?

Posted on July 30, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.


The above image is the best one I’ve seen when it comes to the adoption and integration of AI into healthcare. Of course, this same chart has been used to describe the integration of technology into healthcare in general. The reason this chart is so relevant is that very few healthcare organizations have reached the point where they are an IT enabled business with IT embedded in business with hybrid, cross-functional roles. If this is true for technology in general, AI is still way out there.

In fact, the one complaint I have about this chart is that it’s missing a bubble that should say “What’s AI?” Ok, that’s a little bit of an exaggeration, but not much for many healthcare organizations. They’d more appropriately ask “How can I use AI in healthcare?” but it’s about the same point. Most aren’t there yet, but they’re going to have to get there. AI is coming and in a big way.

The good news is that most of the AI a healthcare organization will use will be embedded in the IT systems they purchase. This is why it’s so important that healthcare organizations have good vendor partners. Healthcare organizations aren’t going to enable this AI future. They’re going to partner with vendors who bring the AI to bear for them. When David Chou shared the image above, he asked the right question “What is your role as the CIO for the adoption of AI?” How many of you know the answer to that question?

If you’re not sure the answer, check out this other image and tweet that David Chou shared about using AI for automation:

I agree 100% with David Chou that if you want to start thinking about how to utilize AI, then start with repetitive tasks which can and should be automated. Take the mundane out of your healthcare providers lives. That will create some early AI wins that will help you to be able to build an AI driven culture in your organization.

Using Video Cameras in Healthcare to Improve Care

Posted on July 27, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I must admit that I didn’t know exactly what I was getting into when I scheduled this video interview with Paul Baratta, Business Development Manager for healthcare at Axis Communications. However, I was intrigued by the idea that they were using thermal cameras in healthcare to detect various healthcare incidents.

The great news is that Paul Baratta really opened my eyes to a lot of possibilities for how various cameras (standard and thermal) can help a hospital work more effectively. Along with talking about the thermal cameras they’ve implemented in hospitals, we also talk about other ways that cameras can help an organization run smoother and more efficiently. Think about a video camera monitoring an IV bag. That’s cool tech. We also talk about the privacy issues related to cameras and the privacy benefits of using thermal cameras. Plus, I ask Paul about the cost and ROI of cameras and whether they’re reasonable for every size healthcare organization or not.

Needless to say, after this interview, I’m even more confident that video cameras are going to be an important part of the wired room in healthcare. To see what I mean, check out my interview with Paul Baratta from Axis Communications.

Let me know what you think of the use of video cameras in healthcare. Do you disagree with any of the comments I or Paul shared? Do you see other applications where video cameras could make a difference in healthcare organizations? Share your thoughts and ideas in the comments or on Twitter with @HealthcareScene.

If you enjoyed this video interview, be sure to Subscribe to the Healthcare Scene channel on YouTube and view the playlist of all our video interviews.

Remote Release of Information: The Next Step in Secure and Compliant Exchange of Patient Health Information

Posted on July 18, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Patty Sheridan, MBA, RHIA, FAHIMA; SVP, Life Sciences at Ciox & Tarun Kabaria; Executive VP, Provider Operations at Ciox.

Across the industry, there is an influx of health information management (HIM) departments and medical groups moving their HIM operations from hospital main campuses and individual physician practices to centralized, offsite locations to gain efficiencies and make better use of valuable square footage in their facilities. For many organizations, this move began decades ago with the implementation of remote coding and/or the need to free up space for patient care.

These ‘virtual HIM” departments can be located at a separate facility, home-based office or remote vendor locations, and result from the continued adoption of electronic health records (EHR) and pressure to manage costs, offering HIM directors and practice administrators the opportunity to reorganize and form more efficient spaces and processes. Outsourcing functions, such as release of information (ROI), allows HIM staff to focus on other priorities of data governance while maximizing available space.

From a financial perspective, costs associated with regulations, staffing, printing, mailing and square footage are increasing; and in some instances, volumes of requests are increasing due to health plans, lawsuits and the portability of healthcare. Furthermore, allowable fees for releasing medical records are decreasing in some states. As a result of these rising financial pressures, healthcare providers are finding it more difficult to make ROI a profit center in their organizations.

HIM departments are experiencing additional pressures from rising health plan request volumes, requiring flexible operational solutions in order to meet the increasing demand. In a typical year, the volume of health plan requests tends to increase to the order of 20-30 percent, and this year those numbers are expected to triple. With such an influx of requests, moving to a virtual model allows for the onsite staff to be augmented with the remote team, fulfilling these large volume requests without impacting the core ROI and patient requests.

Another prevalent challenge is timeliness. With the advent of rebranding the Meaningful Use program to focus on promoting interoperability and the increase in various governmental and payor audits, timeliness of response to requests for medical records is critical and penalties for non-compliance are steep. As such, healthcare providers are reaching the point of diminishing returns in regards to managing the ROI function on their own, and in some cases, will not be able to meet the time deadlines imposed upon them to gain incentives, avoid penalties and takebacks.

These new industry influences create the need for even faster, more efficient, error-free fulfillment of medical record requests and pave the way for a new approach designed to help your organization meet this demand: Remote ROI.

The Remote ROI Process

The ROI process is a time-consuming administrative challenge for HIM professionals, requiring compliance expertise, secure and efficient technology, and a trained and knowledgeable staff. The Remote ROI process starts at your healthcare facility when requests for release of health information are received. From there, your chosen third party vendor, such as Ciox, receives the request from the hospital or practice via a mutually agreed upon, secure mechanism. Securely connected and able to access the hospital or practice EHR, an offsite ROI Specialist then reviews the requests for proper authorizations, identifies and captures the records to be released, and transmits the medical records from your facility’s EHR in an encrypted electronic format to the third party vendor’s ROI centralized processing center. The release is delivered to the requestor through an automatic print and mail process or electronically via a secured delivery method. Ciox’s process is computer-assisted using artificial intelligence and natural language processing thereby reducing turnaround time, improving patient satisfaction and ROI outcomes.

When creating your Remote ROI process, follow these three fundamental steps to ensure its success:

1. Determine the method of access to the Request Letter/Authorization received by the hospital or physician practice.

There are several mechanisms by which requests and authorizations are securely made available to Remote ROI Specialists for ROI processing. The most common methods include:

  • Requests/Authorizations are scanned into the EHR – Staff at the facility scans the requests/authorizations into the EHR. The Remote ROI Specialist accesses the EHR to view the information and begin the process.
  • Requests/Authorizations are faxed – Staff at the facility faxes the requests/authorizations to a fax-in queue provided by the third party vendor. The Remote ROI Specialist accesses the fax-in queue to view the information.
  • Requests/Authorizations are scanned and placed in a shared folder – Staff at your facility scans the requests/authorizations into a shared folder accessible by the Remote ROI Specialist at the third party vendor’s secure Remote ROI Processing Center.
  • Requests/Authorizations are automatically received via health data exchange or health information exchange.

2. Establish connectivity to the EHR to validate the authorization, review the medical records and process the request.

An acceptable baseline for securing the connection to your EHR system(s) must be established for Remote ROI. The appropriate connectivity scenario depends on the underlying technologies at your facility. When understanding which technologies are at your disposal and establishing connectivity, remember that security is key in this part of the process. Keep that in mind when selecting a third party vendor, as it’s paramount to select a company that makes the security of the exchange of protected health information a top priority. Furthermore, it’s of critical importance to select a vendor that has earned certified status for information security by the Health Information Trust (HITRUST) Alliance. The HITRUST CSF Certified Status ensures that key healthcare regulations and requirements for protecting and securing sensitive private healthcare information are met.

3. Ensure compliance standards to track when and who accessed protected health information.

As an added security effort, it’s crucial to follow compliance standards that allow insight as to who accessed patient health information and when it was accessed. To ensure maximum security, computers located at the third party’s Remote ROI processing facility should be secured utilizing encryption, anti-virus protection and web filters.

Passwords should be provided by the facility for access to their specific EHR and stored in an electronic password vault. The password vault should be linked to the third party’s directory that is only accessible by the ROI Specialist using their directory account. Third parties should provide complete audit trail capabilities to track personnel accessing the EHR and processing medical record requests from your applications.

By moving some or all of the onsite ROI functions to a Remote operation, you can streamline the ROI workflow, reclaim square footage for other purposes and have additional capacity available for request volume fluctuation. As an added benefit, the immediate access to requests and authorizations speeds turnaround times on processing requests, which is particularly important when considering tight timelines for meeting Meaningful Use and audit-related releases.

If you’re looking to make HIM operations more efficient and cost effective, Remote ROI can open the doors to achieving those goals.

About Ciox
Ciox is a health technology company working to solve the clinical data illiquidity challenge by providing transparency across the healthcare ecosystem and helping clients manage disparate medical records and a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene. When stakeholders do not have timely access to the complete clinical picture of patients, critical decisions about patient care, medical outcomes research, disease prevention, reimbursement, and payments are sub-optimized. Ciox’s scale, expertise, expansive provider network and industry leading technology platform make it the most reliable clinical data company in the US. Through its standards based technology platform, HealthSource, Ciox helps clients securely and consistently solve the last mile challenges in clinical interoperability.  Learn more about Ciox’s technology and solutions by visiting www.ciox.com

Connecting the Data: Three Steps to Meet Digital Transformation Goals

Posted on July 16, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Gary Palgon, VP Healthcare and Life Sciences Solutions at Liaison Technologies.

A white paper published by the World Economic Forum in 2016 begins with the statement, “Few industries have the potential to be changed so profoundly by digital technology as healthcare, but the challenges facing innovators – from regulatory barriers to difficulties in digitalizing patient data – should not be underestimated.”

That was two years ago, and many of the same challenges still exist as the digital transformation of healthcare continues.

In a recent HIMSS focus group sponsored by Liaison, participants identified their major digital transformation and interoperability goals for the near future as:

  • EMR rollout and integration
  • Population health monitoring and analytics
  • Remote clinical encounters
  • Mobile clinical applications

These goals are not surprising. Although EMRs have been in place in many healthcare organizations for years, the growth of health systems as they add physicians, clinics, hospitals and diagnostic centers represents a growing need to integrate disparate systems. The continual increase in the number of mobile applications and medical devices that can be used to gather information to feed into EMR systems further exacerbates the challenge.

What is surprising is the low percentage of health systems that believe that they are very or somewhat well-prepared to handle these challenges – only 35 percent of the HIMSS/Liaison focus group members identified themselves as well-prepared.

“Chaos” was a word used by focus group participants to describe what happens in a health system when numerous players, overlapping projects, lack of a single coordinator and a tendency to find niche solutions that focus on one need rather than overall organizational needs drive digital transformation projects.

It’s easy to understand the frustration. Too few IT resources and too many needs in the pipeline lead to multiple groups of people working on projects that overlap in goals – sometimes duplicating each other’s efforts – and tax limited staff, budget and infrastructure resources. It was also interesting to see that focus group participants noted that new technologies and changing regulatory requirements keep derailing efforts over multi-year projects.

Throughout all the challenges identified by healthcare organizations, the issue of data integrity is paramount. The addition of new technologies, including mobile and AI-driven analytics, and new sources of information, increases the need to ensure that data is in a format that is accessible to all users and all applications. Otherwise, the full benefits of digital transformation will not be realized.

The lack of universal standards to enable interoperability are being addressed, but until those standards are available, healthcare organizations must evaluate other ways to integrate and harmonize data to make it available to the myriad of users and applications that can benefit from insights provided by the information. Unlocking access to previously unseen data takes resources that many health organizations have in short supply. And the truth is, we’ll never have the perfect standards as they will always continue to change, so there’s no reason to wait.

Infrastructure, however, was not the number one resource identified in the HIMSS focus group as lacking in participants’ interoperability journey. In fact, only 15 percent saw infrastructure as the missing piece, while 30 percent identified IT staffing resources and 45 percent identified the right level of expertise as the most critical needs for their organization.

As all industries focus on digital transformation, competition for expert staff to handle interoperability challenges makes it difficult for healthcare organizations to attract the talent needed. For this reason, 45 percent of healthcare organizations outsource IT data integration and management to address staffing challenges.

Health systems are also evaluating the use of managed services strategies. A managed services solution takes over the day-to-day integration and data management with the right expertise and the manpower to take on complex work and fluctuating project levels. That way in-house staff resources can focus on the innovation and efficiencies that support patient care and operations, while the operating budget covers data management fees – leaving capital dollars available for critical patient care needs.

Removing day-to-day integration responsibilities from in-house staff also provides time to look strategically at the organization’s overall interoperability needs – coordinating efforts in a holistic manner. The ability to implement solutions for current needs with an eye toward future needs future-proofs an organization’s digital investment and helps avoid the “app-trap” – a reliance on narrowly focused applications with bounded data that cannot be accessed by disparate users.

There is no one answer to healthcare’s digital transformation questions, but taking the following three steps can move an organization closer to the goal of meaningful interoperability:

  • Don’t wait for interoperability standards to be developed – find a data integration and management platform that will integrate and harmonize data from disparate sources to make the information available to all users the way they need it and when they needed.
  • Turn to a data management and integration partner who can provide the expertise required to remain up-to-date on all interoperability, security and regulatory compliance requirements and other mandatory capabilities.
  • Approach digital transformation holistically with a coordinated strategy that considers each new application or capability as data gathered for the benefit of the entire organization rather than siloed for use by a narrowly-focused group of users.

The digital transformation of healthcare and the interoperability challenges that must be overcome are not minor issues, nor are they insurmountable. It is only through the sharing of ideas, information about new technologies and best practices that healthcare organizations can maximize the insights provided by data shared across the enterprise.

About Gary Palgon
Gary Palgon is vice president of healthcare and life sciences solutions at Liaison Technologies, a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene. In this role, Gary leverages more than two decades of product management, sales, and marketing experience to develop and expand Liaison’s data-inspired solutions for the healthcare and life sciences verticals. Gary’s unique blend of expertise bridges the gap between the technical and business aspects of healthcare, data security, and electronic commerce. As a respected thought leader in the healthcare IT industry, Gary has had numerous articles published, is a frequent speaker at conferences, and often serves as a knowledgeable resource for analysts and journalists. Gary holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Computer and Information Sciences from the University of Florida.

Mary Meeker’s Internet Trends Report – What It Means for Healthcare

Posted on July 2, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

If you’re not familiar with the famous Mary Meeker Internet Trends Report, then I’m glad to introduce it to you. It’s one of the most influential reports when it comes to what’s happening on the internet. The report is massive and covers a wide variety of topics. So, let’s check it out as a community and share the things that stand out to us and how these internet trends will impact healthcare.

The two trends that stood out to me were voice and personalization.

The graphs related to the quality of voice and the skills related to voice are astounding. It’s not that shocking to suggest that voice is the new interface. I see it first hand with my kids who are all about Alexa to get their questions answered. I’m increasingly doing it as well. Voice is going to change so many things including healthcare. It won’t be long before we’re asking Alexa (or choose your favorite voice app) to schedule an appointment, order a refill, or any number of healthcare related applications.

Along with the consumer voice applications, I also see voice entering the enterprise. In the next 5 years, I believe that exam rooms are going to be revolutionized by voice. The EHR interfaces that currently drive doctors nuts are going to be replaced by voice powered interfaces. It will take longer to fully spread, but we’re already starting to see this voice powered future.

The other trend that stood out for me was personalization. This is a scary trend for many people. However, that’s not true for the next generation. In fact, the fact that healthcare is not personalized is shocking. Not only does personalization not scare the next generation, it’s an expectation. Chew on what that means for the future of healthcare. That’s a massive sea change.

The great thing with personalization is that the data is now available to personalize the experience. We just haven’t seen the applications implemented in healthcare yet. It’s starting to happen though and a couple years from now it will increasingly be a requirement for modern healthcare providers.

Those are two trends that stood out to me. Take a look through the report and let us know what surprised you in the comments of this post or on Twitter with @HealthcareScene.

The Truth about AI in Healthcare

Posted on June 18, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Gary Palgon, VP Healthcare and Life Sciences Solutions at Liaison Technologies.

Those who watched the television show, “The Good Doctor,” in its first season got to see how a young autistic surgeon who has savant syndrome faced challenges in his everyday life as he learns to connect with people in his world. His extraordinary medical skill and intuition not only saves patients’ lives but also creates bridges with co-workers.

During each show, there is at least one scene in which the young doctor “visualizes” the inner workings of the patient’s body – evaluating and analyzing the cause of the medical condition.

Although all physicians can describe what happens to cause illness, the speed, detail and clarity of the young surgeon’s ability to gather information, predict reactions to treatments and identify the protocol that will produce the best outcome greatly surpasses his colleagues’ abilities.

Yes, this is a television show, but artificial intelligence promises the same capabilities that will disrupt all of our preconceived notions about healthcare on both the clinical and the operational sides of the industry.

Doctors rely on their medical training as well as their personal experience with hundreds of patients, but AI can allow clinicians to tap into the experience of hundreds of doctors’ experiences with thousands of patients. Even if physicians had personal experience with thousands of patients, the human mind can’t process all of the data effectively.

How can AI improve patient outcomes as well as the bottom line?

We’re already seeing the initial benefits of AI in many areas of the hospital. A report by Accenture identifies the top three uses of AI in healthcare as robot-assisted surgery, virtual nursing assistants and administrative workflow assistance. These three AI applications alone represent a potential estimated annual benefit of $78 billion for the healthcare industry by 2026.

The benefits of AI include improved precision in surgery, decreased length of stay, reduction in unnecessary hospital visits through remote assessment of patient conditions, and time-saving capabilities such as voice-to-text transcription. According to Accenture, these improvements represent a work time savings of 17 percent for physicians and 51 percent for registered nurses – at a critical time when there is no end in sight for the shortages of both nurses and doctors.

In a recent webinar discussing the role of AI in healthcare, John Lynn, founder of HealthcareScene.com, described other ways that AI can improve diagnosis, treatment and patient safety. These areas include dosage error detection, treatment plan design, determination of medication adherence, medical imaging, tailored prescription medicine and automated documentation.

One of the challenges to fully leveraging the insights and capabilities of AI is the volume of information accumulated in electronic medical records that is unstructured data. Translating this information into a format that can be used by clinical providers as well as financial and administrative staff to optimize treatment plans as well as workflows is possible with natural language processing – a branch of AI that enables technology to interpret speech and text and determine which information is critical.

The most often cited fear about a reliance on AI in healthcare is the opportunity to make mistakes. Of course, humans make mistakes as well. We must remember that AI’s ability to tap into a much wider pool of information to make decisions or recommend options will result in a more deeply-informed decision – if the data is good.

The proliferation of legacy systems, continually added applications and multiple EMRs in a health system increases the risk of data that cannot be accessed or cannot be shared in real-time to aid clinicians or an AI-supported program. Ensuring that data is aggregated into a central location, harmonized, transformed into a usable format and cleaned to provide high quality data is necessary to support reliable AI performance.

While AI might be able to handle the data aggregation and harmonization tasks in the future, we are not there yet. This is not, however, a reason to delay the use of AI in hospitals and other organizations across the healthcare spectrum.

Healthcare organizations can partner with companies that specialize in the aggregation of data from disparate sources to make the information available to all users. Increasing access to data throughout the organization is beneficial to health systems – even before they implement AI tools.

Although making data available to all of the organization’s providers, staff and vendors as needed may seem onerous, it is possible to do so without adding to the hospital’s IT staff burden or the capital improvement budget. The complexities of translating structured and unstructured data, multiple formats and a myriad of data sources can be balanced with data security concerns with the use of a team that focuses on these issues each day.

While most AI capabilities in use today are algorithms that reflect current best practices or research that are programmed by healthcare providers or researchers, this will change. In the future, AI will expand beyond algorithms, and the technology will be able to learn and make new connections among a wider set of data points than today’s more narrowly focused algorithms.

Whether or not your organization is implementing AI, considering AI or just watching its development, I encourage everyone to start by evaluating the data that will be used to “run” AI tools. Taking steps now to ensure clean, easy-to-access data will not only benefit clinical and operational tasks now but will also position the organization to more quickly adopt AI.

About Gary Palgon
Gary Palgon is vice president of healthcare and life sciences solutions at Liaison Technologies, a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene. In this role, Gary leverages more than two decades of product management, sales, and marketing experience to develop and expand Liaison’s data-inspired solutions for the healthcare and life sciences verticals. Gary’s unique blend of expertise bridges the gap between the technical and business aspects of healthcare, data security, and electronic commerce. As a respected thought leader in the healthcare IT industry, Gary has had numerous articles published, is a frequent speaker at conferences, and often serves as a knowledgeable resource for analysts and journalists. Gary holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Computer and Information Sciences from the University of Florida.

Improving Data Outcomes: Just What The Doctor Ordered

Posted on May 8, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Dave Corbin, CEO of HULFT.

Health care has a data problem. Vast quantities are generated but inefficiencies around sharing, retrieval, and integration have acute repercussions in an environment of squeezed budgets and growing patient demands.

The sensitive nature of much of the data being processed is a core issue. Confidential patient information has traditionally encouraged a ‘closed door’ approach to data management and an unease over hyper-accessibility to this information.

Compounding the challenge is the sheer scale and scope of the typical health care environment and myriad of departmental layers. The mix of new and legacy IT systems used for everything from billing records to patient tracking often means deep silos and poor data connections, the accumulative effect of which undermines decision-making. As delays become commonplace, this ongoing battle to coordinate disparate information manifests itself in many different ways in a busy hospital.

Optimizing bed occupancies – a data issue?

One example involves managing bed occupancy, a complex task which needs multiple players to be in the loop when it comes to the latest on a patient’s admission or discharge status. Anecdotal evidence points to a process often informed manually via feedback with competing information. Nurses at the end of their shift may report that a patient is about to be discharged, unaware that a doctor has since requested more tests to be carried out for that patient. As everyone is left waiting for the results from the laboratory, the planned changeover of beds is delayed with many knock-on effects, increasing congestion and costs and frustrating staff and patients in equal measure.

How data is managed becomes a critical factor in tackling the variations that creep into critical processes and resource utilization. In the example above, harnessing predictive modelling and data mining to forecast the number of patient discharges so that the number of beds available for the coming weeks can be estimated more accurately will no doubt become an increasingly mainstream option for the sector.

Predictive analytics is great and all, but first….

Before any of this can happen, health care organizations need a solid foundation of accessible and visible data which is centralized, intuitive, and easy to manage.

Providing a holistic approach to data transfer and integration, data logistics can help deliver security, compliance, and seamless connectivity speeding up the processing of large volumes of sensitive material such as electronic health records – the kind of data that simply cannot be lost. These can ensure the reliable and secure exchange of intelligence with outside health care vendors and partners.

For data outcomes, we’re calling for a new breed of data logistics that’s intuitive and easy to use. Monitoring interfaces which enable anyone with permission to access the network to see what integrations and transfers are running in real time with no requirement for programming or coding are the kind of intervention which opens the data management to a far wider section of an organization.

Collecting data across a network of multiple transfer and integration activities and putting it in a place where people can use, manage and manipulate becomes central to breaking down the barriers that have long compromised efficiencies in the health care sector.

HULFT works with health care organizations of all sizes to establish a strong back-end data infrastructure that make front-end advances possible. Learn how one medical technology pioneer used HULFT to drive operational efficiencies and improve quality assurance in this case study.

Dave Corbin is CEO of HULFT, a comprehensive data logistics platform that allows IT to find, secure, transform and move information at scale. HULFT is a proud sponsor of Health IT Expo, a practical innovation conference organized by Healthcare Scene.  Find out more at hulftinc.com

TigerConnect Successfully Rebrands in Just 9 Months

Posted on April 16, 2018 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

Rebranding is not easy. Rebranding a well-established company that has become synonymous with a form of healthcare communication is even harder. Executing that rebrand in just 9 months while simultaneously preparing for healthcare’s biggest event – the annual HIMSS conference – is a near impossible task. Yet that’s what the team at TigerText, now TigerConnect, pulled off earlier this year.

At HIMSS18, TigerText became TigerConnect. Along with the new name came a new logo – albeit one with a clear homage to their company’s past. The new logo features a cleaner font style and a clever graphic element. If you look closely you will see that the graphic is four interlocking C’s which represent the company’s goal – Connected, Clinical, Communications, and Collaboration. The four colors are meant to represent the four different members of the care team: Doctors, Nurses, Allied Health Professionals, and Patients.

“The old brand was really about texting and compliance,” explained Kelli Castellano, Chief Marketing Officer for TigerConnect. “Not only was the word ‘text’ front and center, but our old brand also had a text box with a lock symbol as the main graphic. You couldn’t get more literal than that. When we first started, we were focused on being the best secure texting and compliance solution in the market. We sold to healthcare compliance officers and to CIOs. The TigerText brand personified that focus and it really served us well.”

But then in 2016, the company launched a new clinical workflow solution called TigerFlow.

“When we showed TigerFlow to prospects it was well received,” Castellano continued. “But people would leave the meeting wondering why their texting company was talking to them about clinical workflow. Worse, many clinicians were confused on being invited to a meeting with TigerText – a company they viewed as a technology infrastructure provider.”

By early 2017, after a few months of research and introspection, the team realized that the company name and brand was holding them back. It was simply too much to ask their target audience, which now included clinical decision makers like CMOs, CMIOs and CNOs, to see the company as anything more than a texting platform.

Castellano and the rest of the Marketing Team knew that rebranding the company would be risky. After all, hundreds of thousands of users click the TigerText logo each day on their phones to communicate securely with their peers. “TigerTexting” had even become a verb used by their customers to describe the act of sending messages through their system.

To gain buy-in and build internal momentum for a rebrand, Castellano asked her team to “do the research” and gather feedback from stakeholders including: customers, board advisors, partners and staff. They found there was consensus for changing the TigerText name.

After three months of work, Castellano and her team, with the support of Co-Founder and CEO, Brad Brooks, officially began the rebranding initiative.

It was now the end of spring 2017 and Castellano set an ambitious goal of launching the new brand at HIMSS18 – only 9 months away. “It was definitely an audacious goal,” admitted Castellano. “But we all knew that it just had to get done. Our Sales Team needed it. Our company needed it. We just had to move forward.”

Castellano allocated half of her ten person team to work on the rebrand while the other half worked on HIMSS18 pre-show marketing and building up their sales funnel. Everything came together and on March 6th the new brand was revealed.

CEO Brooks explained the new name this way: “Our new name – TigerConnect – allows us to clearly articulate the true value our solutions deliver. We connect care teams, existing data systems, and ultimately healthcare communities across a centralized and highly scalable clinical messaging platform. It is this real-time connection to data and people that dramatically improves the way healthcare organizations communicate to drive better results. We wanted that value to be reflected in our name and brand icon which are 4 interlocking C’s that represent Connected Clinical Communication and Collaboration.”

According to Castellano the reaction internally has been overwhelmingly positive. “We gave our staff a preview of the new brand in January. Everyone was very proud and happy with the new name. It was fresh and new, yet it still had a nod to our heritage and roots. Everyone felt that the new brand would allow us to better position the company and elevate the conversations we were having.”

“The reaction at HIMSS was also very positive,” noted Brooks. “The name change gave us the opportunity to talk about our story. We talked about where we had been and where we were going. It was really a lightbulb moment for visitors to the booth. We got a lot of ‘Aha…that makes sense’ comments.”

Having led three rebranding initiatives at three different companies, I applaud Castellano and her team for achieving their goal in such a short time frame. To do it on top of preparing for HIMSS is simply incredible.

It will be interesting to track the growth of TigerConnect in the years to come to see if the rebrand helps the company reach its desired financial results.