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Real Interoperability and Other Micro-moments From #PCCSummit18

Posted on November 7, 2018 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

I love attending user group conferences. They are THE BEST way to get a true sense of what is on the minds of healthcare professionals. I find that people at user meetings are very open and candid. I don’t know why this happens, but I’m grateful it does.

This week, I had the privilege of attending PointClickCare’s annual #PCCSummit18 in Nashville, TN. PointClickCare is the leading EHR provider to the Long-Term and Post-Acute Care (LTPAC) space. Their customers are Skilled Nursing Facilities (SNFs), Senior Living organizations and Home Care providers.

I learned so much about the challenges facing LTPAC providers and I had so much fun connecting with PointClickCare staff as well as their customers. These are some of the memorable/notable moments from the event.

Real Interoperability happening between Hospitals and LTPAC

Interoperability wasn’t just talked about at #PCCSummit18, you could actually see it in action. PointClickCare’s partnership with Redox and their upcoming release of the Harmony interoperability module. More on this in a future article.

Investing in LTPAC Innovation Paying Off

For years PointClickCare has poured millions of dollars into R&D – researching, building, testing and in some cases acquiring new products for the LTPAC market. That investment in innovation continues to pay dividends as end-users and partners applauded each of the new modules/features unveiled at #PCCSummit18.

We’re still talking about faxes?!

The most eye-opening data point shared at #PCCSummit18 came via a real-time audience survey in one of the breakout sessions on LTPAC process optimization. The presenters asked the audience to text back their answer to the following question:

In the past 12 months, which (patient) transitions improvement projects, or remote patient reporting projects have you been a part of?

  1. Improved paper/fax processes
  2. Direct Messaging
  3. 3rd party tools
  4. None

You can see the surprising result. The majority of the audience had either not worked on any such transition improvement project or had been part of one that improved a paper/fax process. Yikes! We have a lot of work to do in #HealthIT.

Using storytelling to make data memorable

My favorite breakout session was by Doug Landis, a professionally trained actor who went onto become the chief storyteller at Box and who is now a venture capitalist. Landis’s presentation was full of useful tips and tactics on how to present data in a memorable way through the power of stories.

No single path to success

On the theme of storytelling, 4 Nashville songwriters presented their stories as the keynote session on Day 3. Each of musicians came to Nashville wanting to become the next breakout star. What happened instead is that each became a songwriter who created a piece that helped a rising star hit it big on the music charts – Carrie Underwood, Lady Antebellom and Miranda Lambert to name just a few. Their stories are proof positive that there are many roads to success and sometimes your own success can be found by helping other succeed.

Everyone leaving happy

Every attendee that I spoke with had nothing but praise for PointClickCare. They felt well taken care of, they thought the venue was fantastic, they thought the social events were incredible and they loved the food. It’s fun to be part of a conference where everyone leaves happy.

 

Health IT Consulting Demand To Explode This Year

Posted on August 24, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

As payment models shift from fee-for-service to value-based care, hospitals are having to adopt new technologies and tweak existing ones. The thing is, it takes a mighty team of IT pros to make all this happen. In some cases, a provider has enough resources to handle this kind of big transition, but most need some help, especially when they’re handling major infrastructure improvements or even switching out technologies.

This seems to be at least part of what’s driving a dramatic increase in spending on health IT consulting, according to a new study from Black Book Research. The study drew on input from 1,586 professionals with knowledge of the US health IT industry.

Black Book concluded that health IT management consulting spending has grown from $20 billion in 2016 to $45 billion last year. Not only that, the firm expects to see this number climb to nearly $53 billion for 2018. That’s a massive increase, particularly given that providers were already spending heavily on consultants as they beat their enterprise EHRs into shape.

According to the analyst firm, 64% of last year’s spending paid for implementation of software, information systems, systems integration and optimization and support for mergers and acquisitions. This summary covers a lot of ground, but it’s hardly surprising given the drastic changes underway.

Going forward, respondents expect three key forces to drive healthcare consulting spend, including a lack of highly-skilled IT professionals (cited by 81% of respondents), adoption of cloud technology in healthcare (74%) and growing industry digitalization (71%). (I’d also expect to see investment in new organizational infrastructures — for, let’s say, ACOs)  — will continue to increase in importance as well.)

Providers responding to the study said that they expect to hire health IT consultants for EHR and RCM system optimization (61%) and to offer expertise in software training and implementation (46%) next year. Other areas providers hope to address include value-based care (39%), cloud infrastructure (36%), compliance issues (33%) and a grab bag of big data, decision support and analytics projects (31%).

The vast majority of respondents (84%) said they expect to enter into a wide range of consulting agreements to include work with single-shop consultants, single freelancers, group purchasing organizations, HIT vendors, networks of freelancers, boutique advisory firms and traditional major consultancies, Black Book reported. In other words, it’s all hands on deck!

#HIMSS18: Pushing Inpatient Care Out

Posted on March 9, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

At present, we need acute care hospitals. Despite the fact that many types of care can now be delivered in outpatient settings, and chronic conditions managed remotely for connected health, there are still some treatments and procedures which can only be done in a big, expensive building.

That being said, some of what I saw at HIMSS18 has convinced me that the drive to push hospital-type services into the community has begun to pick up speed. While nobody seems to have a completely mature solution to decentralizing acute care, I saw some tools that might begin to solve the problem.

Perhaps the most direct example of this trend was offered by a Taiwanese company called Quanta Computer. (The booth was staffed with five company representatives who had flown here all the way from Taiwan, which may suggest that they are not fooling around.)

Quanta was here to pitch QOCA, whose capabilities include offering a “smart hospital at home.”  QOCA Home, an eldercare/assisted living solution including a central, easy to use terminal supporting a wide range of telehealth and connected health services. While the idea is not completely new, the way this blends a smart home approach with connected health intrigued me.

Other vendors took a different approach to some of the same core problems, i.e. managing the patient effectively outside of the hospital. For most exhibitors, this seemed to involve a blend of connected health, care management and patient/provider collaboration.

For example, vendor Virtual Health promises to deliver “whole person health” by tying together providers, healthcare execs, patients and care coordinators. Two points of interest: its solution include a collaborative workflow tool which seems to include patients, something I don’t believe I’ve seen before. Its platform, which is designed to support patients with highly complex medical needs, also addresses social determinants of health, including financial concerns and nutrition.

Now, I’m not here to tell you that any of this is revolutionary. The industry has been kicking around concepts like virtual hospital care, care coordination platforms and the integration of social determinants of health for quite some time, and I’m not suggesting that any of the vendors I saw seem to be all the way there.

Still, what I saw suggests to me that tech vendors are further along in delivering these options than they have been. If you haven’t looked into new platforms that address these issues, now might be the time. They may not be completely ready for prime time, but they’re well on their way.

Are Biometrics Tools Practical For Hospital Use?

Posted on February 21, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

In theory, using biometrics tools could solve some of the hospitals’ biggest data management problems.

For example, if the patient had to register for treatment when seeking care at a hospital emergency department (something I saw in place at my local hospital), it would presumably cut down medical identity fraud substantially. Also, doing patient matching using biometric data could make the process far more precise and far less error-ridden. When implemented correct it can achieve these goals.

In addition, requiring hospital employees to use biometric data to access patient records would lock down those records more tightly, and would certainly make credential sharing between employees far more difficult.

Unfortunately, hospitals that want to use biometric technology have to overcome some major obstacles. According to an article by Dan Cidon, CTO of NextGate, those obstacles include the following:

  • Biometric solutions need to be integrated with primary hospital systems, and that process can be difficult.
  • Most biometric solutions can only manage a subset of patients, which makes it difficult to scale biometrics at an enterprise level.
  • Standard biometric solutions like palm vein and iris scanners demand highly-specialized standalone hardware.
  • Bringing biometrics in-house demands significant server-side hardware and internal infrastructure, bringing the total cost to one that even major health systems might balk at.

On the other hand, Cidon notes, some of these issues can be minimized.

Take the problem of acquiring and maintaining specialized devices. To bypass this issue, Cidon recommends that hospitals try using lower-impact solutions like facial recognition, commodity technology built into patient smartphones. By relying on patient smartphones, hospitals can offload enrollment and registration to patient-owned devices, which not only simplifies deployment but also increases user comfort levels.

He also notes that by using a cloud-based approach, hospitals can avoid allocating a high level of server-side hardware and infrastructure to biometrics, as well as getting added flexibility and affordability, especially if they leverage commodity hardware to do the job.

Even if hospitals act on Cidon’s recommendations, going biometric for patient matching, security and medical identity theft protection will be a major project. After all, hospitals’ existing IT infrastructure almost certainly wasn’t designed to support these solutions and putting them in place effectively will probably take a few iterations.

Still, if putting biometric solutions in place can address critical safety and operational issues, especially dangerous patient record mismatches, it’s probably worth a try.

Amazon May Soon Announce Major Cloud Deal With Cerner

Posted on November 27, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

As I’ve previously noted, Amazon is making increasingly aggressive moves into the healthcare space of late. While it hasn’t been terribly public with its plans—and why should it, honestly?— there been some talk of its going into the healthcare technology space. There’s also much talk about angles from which Amazon could attack healthcare sectors, including its well-publicized interest in the pharmacy business.

Though interesting, all of this has been vaguely defined it best. However, a new deal may be in the works which could have a very concrete effect. It could change not only the future of Amazon’s healthcare industry efforts but also, potentially, have an impact on the entire health IT world.

Think I’m exaggerating? Check this out. According to a story on the CNBC site, Amazon is about to announce a “huge” deal with Cerner under which the two will work together on building a major presence in enterprise health IT for Amazon Web Services. Put that way, this sounds a bit hyperbolic, but let me lay this out a bit further.

As things stand, the online retailer’s Amazon Web Services is already generating almost $20 billion a year, boasting clients across major industries such as technology, energy and financial services. Its only stumbling point to date is that it’s had trouble cracking the healthcare market.

Apparently, at the re:Invent conference in Las Vegas next week, AWS’s CEO will announce that Amazon is teaming up with Cerner to convince senior healthcare leaders to use AWS for key initiatives like population health management.

Sources who spoke to CNBC that the partnership will initially focus on Cerner’s HealtheIntent population health product, presumably as a door into convincing hospitals shift more of the cloud-based business to AWS.

Now why, you ask, is this deal bigger than the average bear?  is it one of those vaporware partnerships that fly a flag and promise a lot but don’t really go anywhere?

Yes, I admit that’s always possible, but in this case, I don’t think it’s going to turn out that way. The fit simply seems to work too well for this to be one of those much-ballyhooed deals that fade away quietly. (In fact, I could visualize a Cerner/Amazon merger in the future, as crazy as that might sound. It’s certainly less risky than the Whole Foods deal.)

For one thing, both Amazon and Cerner have significant benefits they can realize. For example, as the story notes, Amazon hasn’t gotten far in the healthcare market, and given its talent for doing the impossible, it must be really stuck at this point. Cerner, meanwhile, will never pull together the kind of cloud options AWS can offer, and I doubt Epic could either, which gives Cerner a boost in the always next-and-neck competition with its top rival.

If this agreement goes through, the ripples could be felt throughout the healthcare industry, if for no other reason than the impact it will have on the enterprise EHR market. This one should be fun to watch. I’m pulling out the popcorn.

UPMC Plans $2B Investment To Build “Digitally-Based” Specialty Hospitals

Posted on November 20, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

The University of Pittsburgh Medical Center has announced plans to spend $2 billion to build three new specialty hospitals with a digital focus. Its plans include building the UPMC Heart and Transplant Hospital, UPMC Hillman Cancer Hospital and UPMC Vision and Rehabilitation Hospital. UPMC already runs the existing specialty hospitals, Magee-Womens Hospital, Western in Psychiatric Institute and Clinic and Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh.

UPMC is already one of the largest integrated health delivery networks in the United States. It’s $13 billion system includes more than 25 hospitals, a 3-million-member health plan and 3,600 physicians. If its new specialty centers actually represent a new breed of digital-first hospital, and help it further dominate its region, this could only add to its already-outsized clout.

So what is a “digitally-based” hospital, and what makes it different than, say, other hospitals well along the EMR adoption curve? After all, virtually every hospital today relies on a backbone of health IT applications, manages patient clinical data in an EMR and stores and stores and shares imagines in digital form.   Some are still struggling to integrate or replace legacy technologies, while others are adopting cutting-edge platforms, but going digital is mission-critical for everyone these days.

What’s interesting about UPMC’s plans, however, is that the new hospitals will be designed as digitally-based facilities from day one. UPMC is working with Microsoft to design these “digital hospitals of the future,” building on the two entities’ existing research collaboration with Microsoft and its Azure cloud platform.

The Azure relationship dates back to February of this year, when UPMC struck a deal with Microsoft to do some joint technology research. The agreement builds on both UPMC’s fairly impressive record of tech innovation and Microsoft’s healthcare AI capabilities, genomics and machine learning capabilities. For example, in working with Microsoft, UPMC gets access to Microsoft’s health chat bot technology, which is being deployed elsewhere to help patient self-triage before they interact with the doctor for a video visit.

I’d love to offer you specific information on how these new digitally-oriented will be designed, and more importantly how the functioning will differ from otherwise-wired hospitals that didn’t start out that way, but I don’t think the two partners are ready to spill the beans. Clearly, they’re going to tell you all of this is the new hotness, but nobody’s provided me with any examples of how this will truly improve on existing models of digital hospital technology. I just don’t think they’re that far along with the project yet.

Obviously, UPMC isn’t spending $2 billion lightly, so its leadership must believe the new digital model will offer a big payoff. I hope they know something we don’t about the ROI potential for this effort. It seems likely that if nothing else, that technology investment alone won’t drive that big a rate of return. Clearly, other major factors are in play here.

CXO Scene Episode 3: EHR Cloud Hosting, the EMR Market, and Health IT Staffing Challenges

Posted on August 28, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In case you missed the live taping of the third CXO Scene podcast with David Chou, Vice President and Chief Information and Digital Officer at Children’s Mercy Kansas City and John Lynn, Founder of HealthcareScene.com, the video recording is now available below.

Here were the 3 topics we discussed on the 2nd CXO Scene podcast along with some reference links for the topics:
* Cloud hosting
http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/ehr/uc-san-diego-health-pushes-ehrs-to-cloud-uc-irvine-slated-for-november

* Future of the EMR market with McKesson acquisition
http://www.mckesson.com/about-mckesson/newsroom/press-releases/2017/allscripts-to-acquire-mckessons-enterprise-information-solutions-business/
http://www.hospitalemrandehr.com/2017/08/18/is-allscripts-an-also-ran-in-the-hospital-emr-business/

* IT staffing challenges

You can watch the full CXO Scene video podcast on the Healthcare Scene YouTube Channel or in the video embed below:

Note: We’re still working on distributing CXO Scene on your favorite podcasting platform. We’ll update this post once we finally have those podcast options in place.

Take a look back at past CXO Scene podcasts and posts and join us for the live recording of future CXO Scene podcasts.

Emergency Department Information Systems Market Fueled By Growing Patient Flow

Posted on March 20, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

A new research report has concluded that the size of the emergency department information systems market is expanding, driven by increasing patient flows. This dovetails with a report focused on 2016 data which also sees EDIS upgrades underway, though it points out that some hospital buyers don’t have the management support or a large enough budget to support the upgrade.

The more recent report, by Transparency Market Research, notes that ED traffic is being boosted by increases in the geriatric population, an increasing rate of accidents and overall population growth. In part to cope with this increase in patient flow, emergency departments are beginning to choose specialized, best-of-breed EDISs rather than less-differentiated electronic medical records systems, Transparency concludes.

Its analysis is supported by Black Book Research, whose 2016 report found that 69% of hospitals upgrading their existing EDIS are moving from enterprise EMR emergency models to freestanding platforms. Meanwhile, growing spending on healthcare and healthcare infrastructure is making the funds available to purchase EDIS platforms.

These factors are helping to fuel the emergence of robust EDIS market growth, according to Black Book. Its 2016 research, predicted that 35% of hospitals over 150 beds would replace their EDIS that year. Spurred by this spending, the US EDIS market should hit $420M, Black Book projects.

The most-popular EDIS features identified by Black Book include ease of use, reporting improvements, interoperability, physician productivity improvements, diagnosis enhancements and patient satisfaction, its research concluded.

All that being said, not all hospital leaders are well-informed about EDIS implementation and usability, which is holding growth back in some sectors. Also, high costs pose a barrier to adoption of these systems, according to Transparency.

Not only that, some hospital leaders don’t feel that it’s necessary to invest in an EDIS in addition to their enterprise EMR,. Black Book found. Thirty-nine percent of respondents to the 2016 study said that they were moderately or highly dissatisfied with their current EDIS, but 90% of the dissatisfied said they were being forced to rely on generic hospital-wide EMRs.

While all of this is interesting, it’s worth noting that EDIS investment is far from the biggest concern for hospital IT departments. According to a HIMSS survey on 2017 hospitals’ IT plans, top investment priorities include pharmacy technologies and EMR components.

Still, it appears that considering EDIS enhancements may be worth the trouble. For example, seventy-six percent of Black Book respondents implementing a replacement EDIS in Q2 2014 to Q1 2015 saw improved customer service outcomes attributed to the platform.

Also, 44% of hospitals over 200 beds implementing a replacement EDIS over the same period said that it reduced visit costs between 4% and 12%, the research firm found.

Health IT Preserves Idaho Hospital’s Independence

Posted on February 1, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

Most of the time, when I write about hospital IT adoption, I end up explaining why a well-capitalized organization is going into the red to implement its EMR. But I recently found a story in RevCycle Intelligence in which a struggling hospital actually seems to have benefitted financially from investing in IT infrastructure. According to the story, a 14-bed critical access hospital in Idaho recently managed to stave off a forced merger or even closure by rolling out an updated EMR and current revenue cycle management technology.

Only a few years ago, Arco, Idaho-based Lost Rivers Medical Center was facing serious financial hurdles, and its technology was very outdated. In particular, it was using an EMR from 1993, which was proving so inflexible that the claims stayed in accounts receivable for an average of 108 days. “We didn’t have wifi,” CEO Brad Huerta told the site. “We didn’t have fiber. We literally had copper wires for our phone system…we had an EMR in a technical sense, but nobody was using it. It was a proverbial paperweight.”

Not only was the cost of paying for upgrades daunting, the hospital’s location was as well. Arco is a “frontier” location, making it hard to recruit IT staffers to implement and maintain infrastructure, staff and servers, the story notes. Though “fiercely independent,” as Huerta put it, it was getting hard for Lost Rivers to succeed without merging with a larger organization.

That being said, Huerta and his team decided to stick it out. They feared diluting their impact, or losing the ability to offer services like trauma care and tele-pharmacy, if they were to merge with a bigger organization.

Instead of conceding defeat, Huerta decided to focus on improving the hospital’s revenue cycle performance, which would call for installing an up-to-date EMR and more advanced medical billing tools. After the hospital finished putting in fiber in its area, Lost Rivers invested in athenahealth’s cloud-based EMR and medical billing tools.

Once the hospital put its new systems in place, it was able to turn things around on the revenue cycle front. Total cash flow climbed rapidly, and days in accounts receivable fell from 108 to 52 days.

According to Huerta, part of the reason the hospital was able to make such significant improvements was that the new systems improved workflow. In the past, he told RevCycle Intelligence, providers and staff often failed to code services correctly or bill patients appropriately, which led to financial losses.

Now, doctors chart on laptops, tablets or even phones while at the patients’ bedside. Not only did this improve coding accuracy, it cut down on the amount of time doctors spend in administrative work, giving them time to generate revenue by seeing additional patients.

What’s more, the new system has given Lost Rivers access to some of the advantages of merging with other facilities without having to actually do so. According to the story, the system now connects the critical access hospital with larger health systems, as the athenahealth system captures rule changes made by the other organization and effectively shares the improvements with Lost Rivers. This means the coding proposed by the system gradually gets more accurate, without forcing Lost Rivers to spend big bucks on coding training, Huertas said.

While the story doesn’t say so specifically, I’m sure that Lost Rivers is spending a lot on its spiffy new EMR and billing tech, which must have been painful at least at first. But it’s always good to see the gamble pay off.

Paris Hospitals Use Big Data To Predict Admissions

Posted on December 19, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

Here’s a fascinating story in from Paris (or par-ee, if you’re a Francophile), courtesy of Forbes. The article details how a group of top hospitals there are running a trial of big data and machine learning tech designed to predict admission rates. The hospitals’ predictive model, which is being tested at four of the hospitals which make up the Assistance Publiq-Hopitaux de Paris (AP-HP), is designed to predict admission rates as much as 15 days in advance.

The four hospitals participating in the project have pulled together a massive trove of data from both internal and external sources, including 10 years’ worth of hospital admission records. The goal is to forecast admissions by the day and even by the hour for the four facilities participating in the test.

According to Forbes contributor Bernard Marr, the project involves using time series analysis techniques which can detect patterns in the data useful for predicting admission rates at different times.  The hospitals are also using machine learning to determine which algorithms are likely to make good predictions from old hospital data.

The system the hospitals are using is built on the open source Trusted Analytics Platform. According to Marr, the partners felt that the platform offered a particularly strong capacity for ingesting and crunching large amounts of data. They also built on TAP because it was geared towards open, collaborative development environments.

The pilot system is accessible via a browser-based interface, designed to be simple enough that data science novices like doctors, nurses and hospital administration staff could use the tool to forecast visit and admission rates. Armed with this knowledge, hospital leaders can then pull in extra staffers when increased levels of traffic are expected.

Being able to work in a distributed environment will be key if AP-HP decides to roll the pilot out to all of its 44 hospitals, so developers built with that in mind. To be prepared for the future, which might call for adding a great deal of storage and processing power, they designed distributed, cloud-based system.

“There are many analytical solutions for these type of problems, [but] none of them have been implemented in a distributed fashion,” said Kyle Ambert, an Intel data scientist and TAP contributor who spoke with Marr. “Because we’re interested in scalability, we wanted to make sure we could implement these well-understood algorithms in such a way that they work over distributed systems.”

To make this happen, however, Ambert and the development team have had to build their own tools, an effort which resulted in the first contribution to an open-source framework of code designed to carry out analysis over scalable, distributed framework, one which is already being deployed in other healthcare environments, Marr reports.

My feeling is that there’s no reason American hospitals can’t experiment with this approach. In fact, maybe they already are. Readers, are you aware of any US facilities which are doing something similar? (Or are most still focused on “skinny” data?)