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Are You Still Doing the Happy Dance for Your EHR?

Posted on February 16, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today I stumbled upon this video from 6 years ago with Flagler Hospital celebrating the implementation and launch of the Allscripts EMR in their organization. Here’s the video in case you’ve never seen it:

We’ve written previously about the value of these videos bringing the team at your hospital together. Any big project such as an EHR implementation is a challenging thing and it’s important to get your whole team involved and to have some fun in the process.

At the end of the video they hold up a sign that says Good Bye Paper. 6 years later, I wonder how they feel about this video and their EHR implementation. Would they still be doing the happy dance? Could they make another video celebrating their EHR?

I know a few organizations where they could. They’ve implemented the EHR effectively and are happy with how it works. Sure, they still have things they’d like changed, updated, modified, etc. However, they’re generally happy to be on an EHR over paper charts. Plus, there’s a whole generation of doctors now that don’t know the paper charts world and know no difference.

Unfortunately, there are many other hospitals that are cursing their EHR software. They might do a video about their EHR, but it would be a satire video about the challenges they still face using an EHR.

Where are you at with your EHR? Are you doing a happy dance or are you disappointed, frustrated, or upset with having to use an EHR in your hospital? Share your thoughts in the comments.

Reasonable and Unreasonable Healthcare Interoperability Expectations

Posted on February 12, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Other than EMR and EHR, I don’t think there’s any topic I’ve written about more than healthcare interoperability. It’s a challenging topic with a lot of nuances. Plus, it’s a subject which would benefit greatly if we could make it a reality. However, after all these years I’m coming to some simple conclusions that I think often get lost in most discussions. Especially those in the healthcare IT media.

First, we all know that it would be wonderful for all of your healthcare records to be available to anyone who needs them at any time and in any place and not available to those who shouldn’t have access to them. I believe that in the next 15 years, that’s not going to happen. Sure, it would be great if it did (we all see that), but I don’t see it happening.

The reasons why are simple. Our healthcare system doesn’t want it to happen and there aren’t enough benefits to the system to make it happen.

Does that mean we should give up on interoperability? Definitely not!

Just because we can’t have perfect healthcare interoperability doesn’t mean we shouldn’t create meaningful interoperability (Yes, I did use the word meaningful just to annoy you).

I think one of the major failures of most interoperability efforts is that they’re too ambitious. They try to do everything and since that’s not achievable, they end up doing nothing. There are plenty of reasonable interoperability efforts that make a big difference in healthcare. We can’t let the perfect be the enemy of better. That’s been exactly what’s happened with most of healthcare interoperability.

At the HIMSS conference next month, they’re going to once again have an intereroperability showcase full of vendors that can share data. If HIMSS were smart, they’d do away with the showcase and instead only allow those vendors to show dashboards of the amount of data that’s actually being transferred between organizations in real time. We’d learn a lot more from seeing interoperability that’s really happening as opposed to seeing interoperability that could happen but doesn’t because organizations don’t want that type of interoperability to happen.

Interoperability is a challenging topic, but we make it harder than it needs to be because we want to share everything with everyone. I’m looking for companies that are focused on slices of interoperability that practically solve a problem. If you have some of these, let us know about them in the comments.

The Full Spectrum of Information Governance – HIM Scene

Posted on February 7, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Information governance is such an important topic across so many areas of healthcare. It impacts almost every organization and quite frankly takes the full organization to buy in to ensure proper information governance. Doing it right is going to be essential for any healthcare organization to work efficiently and effectively in the future.

While information governance impacts everyone in healthcare, I have to give credit to AHIMA and their HIM professional community for leading the way on the topic of information governance. A great illustration of this leadership is in the AHIMA Information Governance Adoption Model Competencies (IGAM):


*Thanks to HIM professional, Katherine Downing for sharing it on Twitter.

I think a lot of people that work in a hospital and healthcare system don’t recognize a lot of these areas of information governance. At least they don’t look at them from that lens.

My favorite part of this model is that it starts with creating the right information governance structure and the strategic alignment. If you don’t get the right people assigned as part of their job to work on information governance, it will never happen. Plus, if you don’t realize how information governance aligns with the organizations priorities, then you’ll fall short as well.

How far along are you in your information governance efforts? Have you incorporated all of the above elements into your information governance strategy? We’d love to hear your experiences, insights, and perspectives in the comments.

If you’d like to receive future HIM posts in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

The 4 P’s of Innovation in Health Science

Posted on January 31, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

You’ll never meet anyone that loves health data science more than Prashant Natarajan. He literally wrote the book on the subject (Check out Demystifying Big Data and Machine Learning for Healthcare to see why I mean literally). He recently gave a presentation on the 4 P’s of Innovation in Health Science which included this slide:

Sadly, I couldn’t find a recording of his presentation. However, this slide puts health data science in perspective. Prashant boiled it down to 4 simple points. The problem is that too many healthcare organizations are unable to really execute all 4 P’s in their health science innovation efforts.

No doubt each of these 4 P’s is challenging, but the most challenging one I see today is the first P: People.

I’m not sure all of the ways that Prashant addresses the people problem, but it’s somewhat ironic that people is the biggest problem with health science innovation. I see the challenge as two fold. First, finding people who have the health science mindset are hard to find. Competition for people with these skills is fierce and many of them don’t want to get into healthcare which is complex, regulated, and often behind.

The second major health science challenge revolves around the people who collect, aggregate, and enter the data. It’s easy for a front line person to not care about the downstream effects of them entering poor quality data. Not to mention being consistent in what you enter and how you enter it.

It’s somewhat apart of human nature for us to jimmy rig a solution to the problem we face. Those workaround solutions wreaked havoc downstream in your data science efforts. I recently heard the example of a hospital always choosing Mongolian for some setting because it was a setting that would never be used otherwise. The culture of the hospital just knew this is what to do. Once the data scientists started looking at the data they wondered why this Mongolian population kept coming up in their results. Every healthcare organization has their “mongolian” workaround that causes havoc on data science.

What do you think of these 4 Ps of Innovation in Health Science? Is there something missing? Do you see one of these as more important than another?

An EHR Vendor’s Efforts to Address Physician Burnout with Corinne Proctor Boudreau from MEDITECH

Posted on January 24, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Physician burnout is a major problem in healthcare. While there are a lot of things that are contributing to physician burnout, many like to point to the EHR as a major reason why so many physicians are getting burnt out. So, while the EHR can’t completely solve physician burnout, a well designed EHR can help to alleviate some of the stress a physician experiences.

With this idea in mind, we jumped at the chance to sit down with Corinne Proctor Boudreau, Senior Manager, Physician Experience at MEDITECH, to learn about what MEDITECH is hearing from their customers about physician burnout and what they’ve been doing and plan to do to alleviate this challenging problem.

Check out our full physician burnout interview with Corinne Proctor Boudreau embedded below or on YouTube.

You can find all of Healthcare Scene’s interviews on the Healthcare Scene YouTube channel. Also, at the start of the video, I mentioned our new conference, Health IT Expo happening at the end of May in New Orleans. We hope you’ll all be able to join us in New Orleans to learn about practical innovations that can benefit your organization.

The Importance of Good People Doing Good – Martin Luther King Day

Posted on January 15, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today in the US, we’re celebrating the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday. To celebrate the holiday, I thought it would be great to share some of Martin Luther King Jr.’s quotes. Many of the messages are relevant to the healthcare and illustrate what makes those working in healthcare so special.

The Anti Moonshot Conference – Focusing on Practical #HealthIT Innovation

Posted on January 5, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We all love to hear about and read about healthcare IT companies with massive visions that are making big bets on some moonshot idea. In fact, there’s a lot of value in thinking about and having moonshot ambitions that could disrupt healthcare as we know it. However, what’s unfortunate is that it seems like every healthcare IT conference out there is far too focused on these moonshot ideas that they miss talking about and collaborating on ways to innovatively deal with the real life challenges hospital IT professionals face every day.

This is the genesis behind why I finally pulled the trigger and launched a new healthcare IT conference called Health IT Expo. I’ve talked to far too many hospital IT professionals that go away from a health IT conference totally empty and in some cases upset that a conference could be so disconnected from the true healthcare IT challenges and realities they face in their hospitals and health systems.

As I’ve discussed this new conference with people, some get the wrong impression about what we’re trying to accomplish. Some suggest that we’re shunning healthcare innovation. I’d argue quite the opposite. At Healthcare IT Expo, our goal is to embrace the full spectrum of innovation and not just those innovations that might be considered “disruptive” or “breakthrough” innovations.

Let’s consider some of the areas that hospital and health system professionals would really like to see innovation and find answers:

  • How can I more effectively manage and secure my desktop and mobile device infrastructure?
  • What’s the right approach to virtualization in my organization? Is it really cost effective? What are the pitfalls I should be aware of?
  • How do I deal with all these legacy applications?
  • What’s the appropriate steps to take when a security breach occurs? (Yes, I already know a security breach is going to occur)
  • How can I ensure the data in my EHR is high quality data that’s useful in analytics applications?
  • What’s the best way to get data out of my EHR so I can use it for [insert project here]?
  • What actionable things can I do to “secure” my biggest security risk: people?
  • How can I streamline my 15 communication systems?
  • In what ways can I improve my EHR training and ensure my users are performing at optimum levels even with inevitable turnover?
  • What should I really be doing with my portal that’s effective for patients and providers?
  • How can I cost effectively handle my support desk so it can handle level 1, level 2, and level 3 support issues 24/7/365 without alienating the wide variety of users we need to support?
  • Do I need a data center? How should I approach my existing server infrastructure and new cloud options?
  • How can I improve patient identification and patient matching across all of my IT systems?
  • What can I do to improve patient registration?
  • Is single sign-on really possible and what can I do to better handle user provisioning?
  • Have I done a proper HIPAA risk assessment? What’s the right way to do remediation? Have I done remediation of any HIPAA risks found?
  • That’s great that you want to user virtual reality, but how am I going to secure it?
    How are we going to clean it? What’s the product lifecycle going to look like?
  • What’s the proper way to do penetration testing?
  • Where can I find real time analytics that are ready to be implemented today?
  • How can I better manage the hundreds of forms across my organization?
  • etc etc etc

I could go on and on and these are just touching the surface of the challenges. No doubt there are a hundred more challenges that don’t get covered at most healthcare IT Conferences because they have the wrong focus and the wrong people attending.

We all want to talk about AI, but what’s the point if I’m still trying to make sure the data is clean and that it’s stored in something other than a PDF or some inaccessible archaic system? Health IT Expo is focused on practical innovation.

If you’re a healthcare IT professional dealing with these real challenges and are looking for practical innovations that will help you and your organization, please join us at Health IT Expo. We want as many in the Healthcare Scene community to join us in New Orleans, so you can also get $300 off your registration (Only $395 to attend after the discount) for Health IT Expo by using the promo code hcscene on the normal registration page. We’re certain you’ll find no other conference out there that provides as much value for the price.

Plus, the Call for Speakers is still open if you have a practical innovation you can share. We even have options for 15 minute sessions if your innovation is useful and impactful, but doesn’t require a speaking degree to share.

Sorry for the sales pitch, but as you can tell I’m excited by Health IT Expo. I think we’ve created a unique conference that will help many hospital IT professionals find a more satisfying conference experience. As someone who’s attended hundreds of healthcare IT conferences, I’ve seen first hand the good, the bad, and the ugly of conferences. We’re taking all of those learnings and packing them into Health IT Expo.

What do you think of this approach? What do you think of Health IT Expo? What other problems do you have that you think we should cover? We’d love to hear from you in the comments or on our contact us page.

Hospital Holiday Cartoons – Fun Friday

Posted on December 22, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Happy Holidays to all of you! It’s the Friday before Christmas, so we thought we’d go for some holiday humor. Hopefully you have a great weekend and a great holiday.


It’s amazing what technology can replace. I still think most technology will augment what we’re doing in healthcare, but if we’re not involved the tools will replace us.


I guess we all have issues to deal with and why mental health is so important and often forgotten.


Far too many hospitals have really felt this one with all the healthcare mergers that have happened.

Happy Holidays to each of you! Thanks for reading!

ePrescribing and Combating the Opioid Crisis

Posted on December 15, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Healthcare Scene recently sat down with Paul Uhrig, Chief Administrative, Legal and Privacy Officer for Surescripts, to talk about the Opioid Crisis and how technology like ePrescribing including electronically prescribing controlled substances (EPCS) can help deal with the opioid crisis.

We cover a lot of ground with Paul in this interview including some of the core problems with the opioid crisi. Plus, we talk about the evolution of ePrescribing including adoption rates across regular ePrescribing and EPCS (ePrescribing of Controlled Substances) and what’s holding adoption back. We dive into how technology and ePrescribing can help with the opioid abuse problem. I also ask Paul about what lessons we’ve learned from states like New York and Vermont that have already passed legislation that required ePrescribing of controlled substances. Finally, I couldn’t help but also ask Paul about Surescripts work to help during the recent natural disasters.

Check out the full interview with Paul Uhrig from Surescripts embedded below or on YouTube.

If you like this content, be sure to subscribe to Healthcare Scene on YouTube and browse through our other Healthcare IT interviews.

An HIM Twitter Roundup – HIM Scene

Posted on December 13, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

For those that aren’t participating on Twitter, you’re missing out. The amount of knowledge and information that’s shared on Twitter is astounding. The problem is that many people think that Twitter is where you go to talk about yourself. Certainly, that’s an option if you want to do that, but I find that consuming information that people share on Twitter is extremely valuable.

If you’ve never done Twitter before, sign up (it’s free) and then you need to go in and follow about 50 HIM professionals and other healthcare influencers. You can start by following @healthcarescene. HIM professionals are easy to find. Just search for the term AHIMA or ICD-10 and you’ll find a lot of them to follow.

Ok, enough of the Twitter lesson. Just to show you some of the value of Twitter, here’s a quick roundup of HIM related tweets. Plus, I’ll add a little commentary of my own after each tweet.


This is becoming such an important role for HIM professionals in a healthcare organization. HIM staff can do an amazing work ensuring that the data that’s stored in an EHR or other clinical system is accurate. If the data’s wrong, then all these new data based decisions are going to be wrong.


I think upcoding stories are like an accident on the freeway. When you see one you just have to look.


I’m still chewing on this one. Looks like a lot of deep thoughts at the AHIMA Data Summit in Orlando.


The opioid epidemic is such an issue. We need everyone involved to solve it. So, it’s great to see HIM can help with the problem as well. I agree that proper documentation and EHR interoperability is a major problem that could help the opioid epidemic. It won’t solve everything, but proper EHR documentation is one important part.


This is an illustration of where healthcare is heading. So far we’ve mostly focused on data collection. Time to turn the corner and start using that data in decision making.