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Insights from Ted James, MD at the MEDITECH MD & CIO Forum

Posted on October 17, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Over the next couple days, I’m attending the MEDITECH MD and CIO Forum. This is essentially the user conference for the MD and CIO users of MEDITECH software. This morning, they kicked off the event with Ted James, MD, Medical Director at BIDMC/Harvard Medical School. He provided a number of great insights into what’s happening in healthcare and what leaders can do to be more successful.

Below you’ll find a Twitter summary of Ted James, MD’s keynote. You can also watch the live video interviews I’m doing from the event on the Healthcare Scene Facebook page and follow along on Twitter using the hashtag #MDCIO2018.


Healthcare change seems to be an ever ongoing theme. The question really is around the pace of change.


Anyone that’s been through meaningful use understands this experience.


Routine is a powerful idea. So powerful that it prevents change.


Leadership is the key to any change and was a definite theme from Ted James, MD’s keynote.


I love the concept of nudges, but it only works for a subset of use cases in healthcare. Why? Because so many things in healthcare are really complex.


These 3 ideas were really interesting, but I definitely need more time to fully process what they mean. What do you think of these 3 ideas?


This was a really fascinating idea. It illustrates the need to constantly communicate changes so that people get use to the change before the change even occurs. Familiarity with something changes the experience.


Moving an iceberg feels like an apt descrition of healthcare.


This reminds me of when I recently heard that more yoga won’t fix the physician burnout problem.


This is an important lesson for leaders.


This was a refreshing experience to see so many women at a MD and CIO event.

Check back later for more coverage from the MEDITECH MD and CIO Forum.

Heathcare AI Maturity Index

Posted on October 16, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Everywhere you turn in healthcare you’re seeing AI. I know some people would argue with how many companies define AI. In fact, there’s no doubt that AI has started to be used for everything from simple analytics to machine learning to neural networks to true artificial intelligence. I don’t personally get worked up in the definitions of various words since I think all of these things can and will benefit healthcare. Regardless of definition, what’s clear is that this broad definition of AI is going to have a big impact on healthcare.

In a recent tweet from David Chou, he shared a really interesting look at AI adoption in healthcare as compared with other industries. The healthcare AI maturity index also looks at where healthcare’s AI trajectory is headed in the next 3 years. Check out the details in the chart below:

There are a couple of things that concern me about this chart. First, it shows that healthcare is behind other industries when it comes to AI adoption. That’s not too surprising since healthcare is usually pretty risk averse with new technology. The “First Do No Harm” is an important part of the healthcare culture that scares many away from technology like AI. The only question is will this culture prevent helpful new AI technologies from coming to healthcare.

Many people would look at the chart and see that it projects a lot of growth in healthcare AI investment. That’s a good thing, but it also is a common pattern in healthcare. Lots of anticipation and hope that never fully realizes. Will we see the same in healthcare AI?

What’s been your experiences with AI in healthcare? Where do you see AI having the most impact right now? What companies are doing AI that’s going to impact your hospital or health system? Share your thoughts in the comments or on social media with @healthcarescene.

Medical Humor – Fun Friday

Posted on October 5, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It’s Friday as we head into the weekend. Tomorrow I’m heading off to Seattle for the SHSMD 2018 conference. This is my first time attending the event, so we’ll see how it goes and report back later. If you live in the Seattle area, we have an open meetup for the Healthcare Scene community on Tuesday, Oct 9. Find all the details for the Seattle meetup here.

This is conference season, so the week after that I’m heading to Boston for the MEDITECH MD and CIO Forum and then the Connected Health Conference. There are a bunch of meetups planned, but I’m going to definitely be going to this SPM, #pinksocks, #hcldr meetup in Boston. Everyone is welcome, so if you’re in Boston, join us for some fun and good people (word on the street is that there will be a dance party after the meetup).

As always, you can see our full schedule of Healthcare Scene conferences and events. We can’t wait to see everyone in Seattle and Boston.

Ok, enough about travel. Time for some Fun Friday humor to get you ready for the weekend. This humor comes from @DocAroundthClok on Twitter. I think you’ll enjoy it.

This 2nd one seems particularly interesting after I just wrote about all the meetups in this post. If you’re like this doctor, then you should definitely join us at the meetups. No eye contact required. I’ll be surprised if the dance party doesn’t include the song Despacito.

Have a great weekend!

New MEDITECH EHR API – An Interview with Niraj Chaudhry

Posted on October 2, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The EHR API has been a hot topic lately. Many healthcare organizations and startup companies are looking to EHR vendors in order to connect applications that exist outside the EHR with the EHR. Years ago (2012 to be exact), I wrote that the EHR is the database of healthcare and with all of these APIs coming out, we’re seeing that come to fruition.

The good news is that EHR vendors are finally starting to embrace this viewpoint as well. Many of you have probably read Colin Hung’s article that looks at 2 EHR vendors and their APIs. Many of you probably saw the announcement of MEDITECH’s new app development environment called MEDITECH Greenfield. It’s great to see MEDITECH launching an API for developers who want to engage with their Expanse platform. To learn more about this new platform, we sat down with Niraj Chaudhry, Director of Development Advanced Technology Division from MEDITECH.

What’s the motivation for MEDITECH to launch Greenfield?

Interoperable, open architecture EHR platforms that promote sharing resources for collective growth are critical for driving innovation and progress in today’s healthcare paradigm. By offering a space for mobile app development, MEDITECH is adding more capabilities and value to our customers’ EHRs and driving efficiencies for better community outcomes. Our customers will be able to enhance the EHR experiences of their providers, patients, and consumers with innovative apps available on any mobile device.

Greenfield is a natural extension of what we’ve done with MEDITECH Expanse and reinforces our commitment to a mobile, web-based EHR. We are excited about working with third-party developers and increasing our visibility with the creation of apps to augment Expanse.

What data will developers be able to access through Greenfield?  Is it a read-only environment or will developers be able to write back to MEDITECH using the Greenfield API as well?

Currently, our testing environment includes a list of available Common Clinical Data Set APIs and associated documentation. These APIs support GET methods and so give read-only access to the data. Developers can register now to get started. More APIs will be added to the Greenfield in future which will support other methods such as PUT and POST, and so will allow the ability to write data back to the Greenfield environment.

Will Greenfield only work with Expanse or will it work with other MEDITECH products?

Currently, MEDITECH Greenfield is available to MEDITECH Expanse customers.

Are there costs associated with companies participating in Greenfield (ie. signup and/or usage)?

There are no costs to sign up, access or use Greenfield.

What type of promotion will you do for companies who choose to leverage MEDITECH Greenfield in their application? What are you planning to do so MEDITECH users learn about new partners?

In the future, we plan on highlighting select (or “preferred”) mobile apps that we feel add significant value to the MEDITECH platform. This is still in the very early stages and business models for how we will list or promote apps are being discussed.

Will any company be able to sign up for Greenfield or will you restrict it to a certain number of companies or certain types of companies?

Any interested developers can sign up for access through a secure login process here.

A Nursing Informatics Perspective on Healthcare Analytics – Interview with Charles Boicey

Posted on September 21, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Healthcare informatics has been around for a long time. However, from my perspective, it feels like there’s something different in the air when it comes to healthcare informatics. I get the feeling that we’re on the precipice of something really special happening. In fact, I think we already start to see value being created by healthcare informaticists.

As Healthcare Scene continues to explore this subject, we sat down with informatics expert, Charles Boicey, Chief Innovation Officer at Clearsense, to talk with him about what’s changed in healthcare informatics that makes it different today than in the past. We also talk about what’s needed to make healthcare analytics efforts successful at organizations and what analytics trend he’s watching most. Plus, we had to talk about his background as a nurse and how a nursing background really helps his informatics work.

If you want to hear of some practical uses of healthcare analytics and how your organization can benefit from it, you’ll enjoy our interview with Charles Boicey.

Be sure and subscribe to all of Healthcare Scene’s videos on YouTube. Also, take a minute to check out EXPO.health and join us in Boston to mix and mingle with amazing healthcare IT professionals like Charles Boicey.

Looking Forward to #AHIMACon18 – HIM Scene

Posted on September 19, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This weekend is the start of the AHIMA Annual Convention happening in Miami, Florida. For those not familiar with the AHIMA organization, it brings together HIM professionals from across the country. Something that I think makes AHIMA unique is that around the HIM conference are multiple days of training and certifications for HIM professionals. I’m always amazed at how much work HIM professionals have to put in to keep up with their certifications and to stay up with things like the ever-changing world of medical coding. HIM definitely doesn’t get the credit they deserve in this regard.

As I think what topics will be hot at this year’s AHIMA Annual convention, I’m most interested to hear what the HIM crowd thinks about the changes to the Physician Fee Schedule and E&M Coding. This is going to be a big deal for healthcare and medical coders are going to be the ones charged with dealing with the changes. Sure, doctors will have to change how they are documenting as well, but verifying that it was documented correctly and making sure the medical coding matches that documentation is mostly done by HIM professionals.

I’m really interested to hear what HIM professionals think about these medical coding changes. What do you think of the new time based coding options? Does this make life easier or not? Let us know what you think and what you’re hearing in the comments. The obvious part to me is that in the short term it’s not going to make medical coders’ lives easier at all. It’s just one more code they’re going to have to deal with and it doesn’t have a history of practices to support what’s acceptable or not. It’s not like these new codes are doing away with the old codes. At least I don’t think that’s how most practices are going to handle these new codes, but we’ll see. Let us know your thoughts in the comments.

Another big change that could impact HIM professionals, particularly medical coders, are the new remote monitoring and digital care coordination codes. I’ve heard a lot of people saying that these codes show some promise. However, I’m starting to hear overtures that the codes aren’t going to live up to their billing (excuse the pun). What are you seeing when it comes to the new coding for telemedicine, remote monitoring, and digital care coordination?

Outside of these two big topics, I’ll be interested to hear how HIM professionals are looking at security and privacy. It’s become a huge topic in the CIO and healthcare IT world. I wonder how much it will impact the HIM world. There’s always an interesting dance when a breach happens. The HIM world is great at understanding disclosures and HIPAA violations, but breaches often bring out a lot of different people. The reality is that when a breach occurs it needs to be all hands on deck. However, my guess is that many HIM professionals aren’t part of the discussion when a breach occurs. How’s your experience been in this regard? If you haven’t had a breach (lucky you), you should still have some policies and some drills in place to make sure you’re ready. So, you should have an idea of what HIM’s role would be in a breach.

Another trend I’ve been watching for a number of years is the push for more and more HIM professionals to be involved in things like healthcare analytics. This was highlighted by a recently published article in the Journal of AHIMA that makes the argument that all healthcare professionals need to learn data analytics. I argued something similar in this article on how HIM professionals can use Information Governance to ensure they’re heard. These are important messages that I think many in HIM are largely ignoring. It will be interesting to see how this shakes out. Those that embrace the changes will be well positioned for the future.

What other things should we be watching for from an HIM perspective? What’s keeping you up at night? What’s getting you most excited about your job? Let us know in the comments or on Twitter @HealthcareScene.

Healthcare Communication Software with the Patient at the Center

Posted on September 12, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I was recently at the KLAS Digital Health Investment Summit where I met a ton of great people. One of those people was Brent Lang, CEO of Vocera. I have a long history with Vocera, but I’d never had a chance to meet Brent in person. As fate would have it, we sat down by each other at the opening dinner and had a great conversation about our overlapping connections, about Vocera, and the healthcare communications market in general.

Of all the insights Brent shared, I couldn’t stop thinking about his comment that Vocera was working hard to make the patient be the center of all their communication.

I’m sure some critics out there might wonder why the patient wasn’t at the center to start. Notice that he didn’t say that they were putting the patient at the center of their work. Knowing them as I have, I think they’ve been putting the patient first for a long time. However, as I understand it, Brent is suggesting a paradigm shift in how provider communication is designed.

Here are my thoughts on what he was saying. It makes sense when you’re first designing their popular Vocera badge communication (1 million+ badges) why most of the communication would be focused around the providers. The goal of those communication devices was to enhance provider communication. The nurse and doctors needed an “inbox” for their messages so they could read or listen and reply as needed. Having the providers at the center of those communications makes a lot of sense. The technology was looking to replace things like pagers and overhead speakers and it did that well.

The challenge comes as Vocera has taken on more and more communication modalities. Vocera now has secure text messaging, alarms and alerts, and integrations with a wide variety of clinical and EHR systems. Many of these messages need to be sent to a wide variety of providers and which provider needs the message can change over time. It’s no longer a one to one communication that’s needed. Plus, the history of messages for a specific patient across multiple platforms and multiple providers can be as valuable as the specific, in the moment message. Thus the need to put patients at the center of the messaging.

It’s a powerful idea that a provider could see all the messages for a patient in one location. It is probably how messaging should have always been done, but the implementation of technology is an iterative thing. If you try and do everything you end up doing nothing. It’s great to see Vocera iterating in a way that puts the patient at the center of their communication platform.

As I thought about this change, I wondered what other healthcare IT systems should have the patient at the center. It’s actually hard to think of healthcare IT applications where the patient is at the center. EHRs are largely focused around the provider workflow and not the patient. Some of them are trying to make this shift too. We do see it happening with new healthcare IT companies. I advise a company called CareCognitics that is an example of a company that puts the patient at the center. I recently wrote about Patient Directed that puts the patient at the center as well. It will be interesting to see which older healthcare IT companies adapt and put the patient at the center like Vocera is doing and which new companies come along with this paradigm shift built in.

Always Remembering 9/11

Posted on September 11, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’m not sure what it’s like for other people, but 9/11 is a day full of really mixed emotions for me. I’ve been reminded of it over the past couple weeks when people want to schedule meetings with me. As we’ve talked over schedules, I’ve wondered if I should schedule a work meeting on 9/11. The feelings are so raw for me that a part of me feels like that’s not appropriately honoring all of the people that lost their lives. The other part of me feels like carrying on is the best way to honor those that lost their lives. I palpably remember the feeling that the evil people win when we stop doing what we do. So, I try to have a normal day on a very not normal day.

We all have to deal with tragedies in our own way. I was grateful last night when my daughter came and asked me if I wanted to talk to her before she went to sleep. I laid down next to her and just talked. That’s a great moment and one that I’d remember and be grateful for if tragedy struck. I need to create more of those moments and never take them for granted.

There are so many stories out there from 9/11. I’m grateful that my children are learning about it from all of the movies and documentaries done about it. However, I don’t think they can fully understand. When I’m blogging on 9/11, I’ll always think of the story of Dirk Stanley on 9/11.

Many of you probably know Dirk since he’s active in healthcare IT social media. If you have met Dirk you would know almost instantly that he’s an amazing individual. However, this story takes the cake when it comes to illustrating the type of people we have working in healthcare IT. Plus, Dirk doesn’t really think much of it and certainly doesn’t want any honor. I’ve heard him say that he was just doing what he could to help even as a 3rd year medical student. That’s what makes him so special. Enjoy Dirk’s inspiring story below as told by ABC News Channel 7 in New York.

What a tragic day, but stories like Dirk’s still give me hope for the future.

EHR Efficiency Takes Extra Training, Optimized Systems, and One-on-One Support

Posted on September 6, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We all know that physician burnout is a real problem and the EHR gets a lot of the blame for that burnout. Well, the team at UC Davis Health decided to address this problem by creating a team focused on it. They called their team the Physician Efficacy Program or PEP for short. PEP was an interesting name for it since in many ways this team were a bunch of highly trained EHR cheerleaders that work with providers to help them work more efficiently in the EHR.

How did this team work and what did they accomplish? UC Davis Health shared what they did and some of their results in these tweets below:

Those are some impressive results. I think every doctor would love to have 25 hours per month of their life back. I’m sure that some organizations that see this will wonder how their organization could afford to have a PEP team go around and train their physicians. At 25 hours per month saved per provider, the better question is how a healthcare organization can afford to not invest in a team like this.

Now we just need the team at UC Davis Health to share more details about what they did to achieve these efficiency gains. I wonder how many of them were individual tweaks and how many of them were broad system changes. How do we get all the experience and knowledge gained by the team at UC Davis Health to the rest of healthcare?

Pocket Health Sensors

Posted on September 5, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’ve long talked about the explosion of wearable sensors that’s happening in the market. The number is amazing. Now I’m just waiting for them to go a little deeper as far as what they can offer that’s clinically relevant. That said, I’m also impressed with how small these sensors are becoming. They can easily fit in your pocket or purse with no problem.

An example of this movement is the ECG that was recently sent to me by SnapECG. They have a wide variety of ECG sensors, but they sent me the SnapECG Handheld ECG Recorder (Available on eBay and Amazon). I have to admit that receiving it was a bit underwhelming. It was so simple to use that it didn’t need much information. That said, it would have been nice to have a little card that said basically that there was nothing for me to do other than download the app on my smartphone and get started.

Regardless it was super easy to unpackage it, download the app and pair it with my smartphone. No doubt I’m a more advanced user and so a few more prompts on the mobile app might be a good idea, but all in all, it was amazing how simple it was to start using the sensor. Plus, there’s something calming about watching the ECG being recorded (maybe they should pair it with a mindfulness app).

After doing the reading, the next challenge was figuring out what to do with the data. There’s an option on the app that says “Professional Advice” but it required a login and so I didn’t want to go that direction. Plus, how did I know the quality of the professional advice? As someone active on social media, I decided to share my report on Twitter and ask my community what else I should do with the reading. The amazing part was how simple it was for me to share that report on social media. It made me really wish that sharing the report with my doctor was that easy…but I digress.

Along with some great snarky replies, I also learned about the difference between a single lead ECG and one that would be used in a doctors office. I even had a doctor reply with the following:


The doctor went on to share that it can measure resting heart rate, target exercise heart rate, and rhythm regular/irregular. Although, he did make clear that the key is for the data to come from a wearable that produced accurate data.

I was aware of this possible issue, but I wonder how many consumers wouldn’t think twice about how accurate the readings from the wearable were for them. I can hear someone reasoning that they bought it at BestBuy or Amazon and so they must have vetted the quality of the reading, right? I’m sure some of you are laughing, but I’m quite sure this is how much research many people do on the accuracy of their wearable devices. I instead look for the FDA clearance which SnapECG has said they’re working on and they’re planning to have it cleared in the middle of September.

The SnapECG was originally launched in China and now they’re bringing it to the US. I’ll admit I’m not that familiar with the Chinese medical device world, but the device has been awarded CE certification (EU) and China’s CFDA certification. A lesson that many chinese companies learn is that those don’t really seem to carry much weight to those of us in the US.

In fact, it should come as no surprise that many people in the US will be skeptical of wearables coming from China and other overseas countries. The smartest thing a company like SnapECG can do is to partner with a trusted US brand like the Mayo Clinic or Cleveland Clinic. Most people in the US will trust something that has been vetted by those organizations who are extremely protective of their brands. Plus, it’s easy to see why their “Professional Advice” app feature would carry a lot more weight if that advice was tied to a well known US healthcare organization than a basically anonymous one with Chinese ties.

At the end of the day, the real question for all of these wearables is what value can you provide the patient and how quickly can you provide that value? Plus, will patients understand the value that a single lead ECG can provide them? And will they understand the limitations of what it can and can’t tell you? This is why the software that comes paired with the device is so important. Plus, as these devices become more and more clinically relevant, you’re going to want that data available to a care provider you trust as well.

Yes, I understand some of the challenges of over monitoring and how that can lead to false positives and unnecessary care that has a wide variety of bad consequences. However, over time I believe we’re going to have the right mix of devices, data analytics, and software that will effectively analyze wearable device data and make it actionable and useful to you as a patient and to your doctor. We’re not there yet, but it’s amazing to see how things continue to evolve even since AliveCor offered the first single lead ECG for mobile devices. It still feels like we’re just getting started and none of us can even imagine what we’ll have 10 years from now.