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10 Useful Resources Shared at HMPS18

Posted on May 15, 2018 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

I recently had the opportunity to attend Healthcare Marketing & Physician Strategies Summit (#HMPS18) in Salt Lake City. This was my second time attending the conference and it was just as exciting and educational as my first experience

Consumerism and improving the patient experience dominated the conference with many sessions and exhibit booths dedicated to strategies, tactics and technologies that were designed to address the challenge of rising patient expectations. Many familiar names were exhibitors including: Lionshare, Stericycle Communication Solutions, Influence Health, ReviveHealth, MERGE Atlanta, Healthgrades, Tea Leaves, True North Custom, Evariant, and Hailey Sault.

There have already been some great summaries written about the conference. Most notably from:

Rather than write another summary I thought I would share some of the amazing resources that were shared during the conference – resources that I believe anyone in Healthcare that is involved in marketing or patient experience would find helpful.

One of the best resources was from Shawn Gross of White Rhino. In his session Shawn walked us through a “Micro-Moments of Patient Trust” journey map. This is about as succinct a map as you’ll find that captures the essential elements of a typical interaction with a non-chronic patient.

Amy Jose from Spectrum Healthcare Partners captured this enlightening chart from Cleveland Clinic that shows what social media channels they post to during the day. It wasn’t surprising to see that Facebook and Twitter dominate the chart, but what was a bit shocking was the frequency. Kudos to the Cleveland Clinic team for developing enough content to drive this level of social interaction.

One of the undertones of HMPS18 was that the role of Healthcare Marketers is changing. Instead of being just a master of traditional marketing tactics, leaders will be expected to be master scientists as well. The Marketer Scientist will need to mix data analysis, systems thinking and technology prowess along with storytelling, branding and leading change.

This slide captured by Meghan Lugo from Jennings is a great reminder to anyone in sale or marketing. My favorite is #5 – focus on helping not selling. When you help someone, you create a real connection. Connection leads to trusted relationships and relationships are the foundation for any sale. True for Health IT software and equally true for healthcare services.

While at the conference I had the opportunity to be one of three audience members for a podcast recording hosted by Reed Smith and Chris Boyer. Interesting insights on Facebook and healthcare’s new “digital front door” were shared by the podcast panelists: @dandunlop @tmoore634RN @AndrewDRainey and JK Loyd

Need help convincing senior management that you need to invest in service recovery? Check out these amazing comments from HCA patients that revised poor online reviews after the hospital made sincere efforts to make it right.

Linda McCracken shared a sobering slide about how much consumer experiences are influencing patient expectations – and rightfully so. I was surprised at how 45% of people will not travel more than 10 miles for routine care. Can anyone say tele-consults?

Another great share from Amy Jose, this time a slide full of stats on patient and consumer digital health usage.

One of the best sessions I attended at HMPS18 was this one with Renown Health CEO Tony Slonim MD @RenownCEOTonyMD and Chief Marketing Officer, Suzanne Hendrey @healthmktr. It was full of great tips and suggestions on how senior executives can engage with patient and the community in an authentic way that also helps drive towards the goals of the organization. Thankfully for those that couldn’t be there Dan Dunlop Periscoped the entire session.

Finally, there’s this video shared by Paul Griffiths friend and CEO of MedTouch. It’s not a resource per se, but it is a touching video that tells his personal story and what’s driving him to improve healthcare.

 

Investment in IT Infrastructure Needed to Power Healthcare Transformation

Posted on May 11, 2018 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

Genomics, artificial intelligence, chatbots and a host of other technologies are accelerating the transformation of healthcare from a paper-based system to a digital one. In order to power this transformation, IT infrastructure (storage, computational power, security, etc) needs to move from an implementation afterthought to the forefront of strategic planning. Windstream Enterprise is one company that is working closely with healthcare providers to ensure their IT infrastructure is ready for the challenges ahead and helping to put the infrastructure conversation front-and-center.

Windstream is part of the wave of companies that have successful track-records in other industries that are now bringing their solutions to healthcare. This wave is being led by technology giants like Amazon, Apple and Google. The moves they make in healthcare get a lot of attention and rightfully so. Check out the excellent coverage by Christina Farr over at MSNBC for more information.

Although I am intrigued by what the big tech companies are doing, what I truly find fascinating (and frankly inspiring) is the work of the hundreds of companies not named Amazon, Apple and Google. Windstream is one of the companies I have been interested in ever since I saw them at HIMSS17 and wondered “What is an Internet access provider doing in healthcare?”

Windstream was formed back in 2006 when Alltel spun off it’s landline business and merged it with VALOR Communications Group. Back then they provided 3.4 million access lines (telephone and internet connections) in 16 states. Over the years they have continued to grow through acquisition, expanding into fiber transport networks and fixed wireless. Windstream Enterprises, a division of Windstream, has had tremendous success helping clients in the retail and banking industries build and manage their technology infrastructure.

I recently had the chance to sit down with Windstream’s President and CEO, Tony Thomas and one of their clients, the University of Kentucky Healthcare (UK), to talk about why healthcare needs to continue to invest in good IT infrastructure.

You can watch the full recording of our conversation here:

Thomas sees a lot of similarity between the digital transformation happening in healthcare and the ones that swept through the financial services and retail sectors.

“When you look at the success we’ve had in retail and banking, and then you look at where healthcare is heading, the commonality is the push to technology,” explained Thomas. “You can see that technology is changing the way that healthcare gets done. There is a focus on the patient experience and cost transformation.” This same focus on improving customer experiences and reducing costs is what helped spur the adoption of cloud and other advanced technologies at banks and retailers.

One driver of technology adoption in healthcare is the higher expectations patients have of healthcare provider. These higher expectations are fueled by the prevalence of (and convenience of) consumer technologies that have made our lives so much easier: online shopping, online banking, booking appointments through our smartphones, etc.

In 2016, Deloitte released a study that compared consumer use of technology for health vs other aspects of their lives. Not surprisingly their findings showed that healthcare lagged behind.

I see the delta between the use of technology as a consumer vs as a patient as a demand gap. The more healthcare lags behind, the more demand patients will put on healthcare organizations to adopt technologies that mirror what they experience as consumers.

To close that gap, organizations have accelerated the implementation of technologies like chatbots, omni-channel communications, artificial intelligence and data analytics. However, when you couple these new technologies with the use electronic health records and advanced lab systems, the result is explosive data growth.

“Over the last two years we have generated over 1.2 Petabytes of pathology data,” noted Cody Bumgardner PhD, Assistant Professor of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine at the University of Kentucky Healthcare (a Windstream client). “Pathology is really the collection of different points of data: images, genomic & laboratory data. Digital Pathology is taking all that data, making it both operationally effective and ready for computational analysis – transforming it into something useful and actionable for clinicians. Pathology and pathological reports arguably provide the most actionable data in the patient record and it is relatively low-cost relative to other data sources.”

“As the number of health and wellness devices increases,” continued Bumgardner. “It means we will have to collect and analyze more and more data. You will need some solid infrastructure to allow that data to flow and you will need good computational power as close to the point of data generation as possible.”

Getting funds and resources to keep IT infrastructure up to date is not easy. Jan Bates, Director of Systems Operations at the University of Kentucky Healthcare summed it up succinctly: “It’s hard to get buy-in from executives because it’s not something they have a keen interest in discussing. In fact, many find it boring. You HAVE TO relate infrastructure back to the business. You have to answer the questions: What benefits will the organization realize? and What will the organization be able to do when the infrastructure is well maintained?”

The answer according to Windstream’s CEO Tony Thomas is nothing short of transforming the way healthcare is delivered: “We are really at an exciting time in healthcare. There are tons of new technologies emerging [like AI]. We’re going to need solid investments in the underlying infrastructure to support those technologies which will revolutionize the way healthcare is delivered.”

It gives me hope that companies like Windstream are bringing their extensive data and infrastructure management expertise from the banking sector to healthcare. Although healthcare is a unique industry, that doesn’t mean we are restricted to adopting solutions developed by healthcare insiders. We can (and should) leverage the best from other industries and adapt them to the unique aspects of healthcare.

“Given the opportunities we see in healthcare, we are increasing our investment here.” stated Thomas. “We think we can be a provider of choice for many healthcare organizations. In the end it’s all about the application of technology to solve problems in healthcare.”

Well said.

PX2018: The Line Between Patient Experience and Patient Engagement Continues to Blur

Posted on May 4, 2018 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

The 2018 Patient Experience Conference, #PX2018, hosted by The Beryl Institute, was a wholly different than previous incarnations. In prior years the central focus was squarely on patient experience. This year, there was significant emphasis placed on patient engagement and activating patients. It was a welcome change.

The Beryl Institute’s annual conference is one of the events I look forward to each year. It is a positive, upbeat, and reaffirming event that brings together healthcare professionals involved with improving patient experience. Attendees come from around the world including: Canada, UK, Sweden and Asia. This gives the event an international flavor and brings together many different perspectives on patient experience.

In 2004, I attended my first patient experience conference. Back then the event was organized and hosted by the Society of Healthcare Consumer Advocacy (SHCA) – a society within the American Hospital Association. In those days, the annual gathering was designed specifically for Patient Feedback professionals and Patient Advocates that worked inside hospitals. The event, was dominated by sessions about patient surveys (later becoming HCAHPS) and timely responses to patient complaints. For many years the annual SHCA event remained operationally focused.

In 2013, SHCA was integrated into The Beryl Institute and things began to shift markedly. Instead of an annual SHCA conference that was narrowly aimed at patient complaints, the new conference from The Beryl Institute was much broader and covered the whole of patient experience. The sessions became less operational and more strategic in nature. Words like “empathy” and phrases like “meeting patients where they are” became part of the hallway chatter.

Fast forward to 2018. “Patient Experience” has become an even broader term and perhaps slightly overused. All sorts of HealthIT companies and consulting firms now boldly state they are in the patient experience business. The term is now used to refer to everything from patient advocacy to patient rights to online reviews (and reputation management) to patient engagement/activation. As the definition has changed, so too has The Beryl Institute conference.

The first hint that something was different came when I scanned the program agenda a few weeks before the conference. There were several sessions that I did not expect to see:

  • Engaging Families and Teams in I-PASS to Improve Patient Safety and Experience
  • OpenNotes: Breaking Barriers, Changing Culture, Engaging Patients
  • Building Operational Capacity for Patient Engagement

I was also pleasantly surprised by the depth and breadth of vendors in the exhibit hall. Companies like OneView, TVR Communications, Relatient and eVariant each had demonstrations of products that educated patients, reminded patients about their care plans and directed patients to the most appropriate service line or physician based on an analysis of their needs. All of these capabilities are focused in the world of patient engagement yet judging by the busy traffic at these booths, it is clear that patient experience professionals are stakeholders and influencers for the purchase of those solutions.

Even consulting companies like Cast & Hue (who did a fun design-thinking exercise in their booth) talked about how they can help healthcare organizations build better processes and workflows to encourage more patient involvement.

I welcome the blurring between patient experience and patient engagement. Although it is possible to be good at one without the other, the goal should be to improve one alongside the other. To me, patient engagement is tangible and measurable – something which was becoming increasingly difficult to do in the world of patient experience pre-2010. I believe a good patient experience is a prerequisite to engaging patients in their care which leads to better outcomes – which is ultimately the goal we are all striving for.

UW Medicine, Valley Medical Center Reduces Medical Errors With Better Clinician Communication

Posted on April 20, 2018 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

Improving patient safety while simultaneously reducing clinician workloads, increasing efficiency and elevating the patient experience is an almost impossible task. Yet the team at University of Washington Medicine, Valley Medical Center found a way to do just that. Using a secure communications platform from Voalte, the Valley Medical Center team implemented processes that not only reduced the occurrence of pressure ulcers but also improved staff morale.

It is not obvious that improving the communication between patients, clinicians and administrators can lead to better outcomes, but for James Jones (BSN, MSN, NEA-BC), Vice President PCS & Nursing Operations at UW Medicine, Valley Medical Center, he believed it could:

“Being a nurse I realized that if you want patient care to be successful, better patient outcomes and improve the patient experience, you need to start with clinicians first. Without the clinicians, you cannot be successful. They are the entryway for the patient into the organization.”

Jones felt that by investing in clinicians and reducing their workload, they would have more time and energy to focus on improving patient experience as well as patient outcomes. To verify his theory and to gain buy-in from the organization, Jones and his team met with clinicians to ask what they wanted and how THEY would go about improving patient outcomes.

After many meetings, the Valley Medical Center team found that improving internal communications was high on everyone’s priority list. Many clinicians truly believed that better communication would lead to safer patient care – especially in the area of skin-integrity related adverse events (medical errors).

The impact of adverse events and medical errors on US Healthcare are staggering:

  • 10% of all US deaths, approximately 250,000 per year, are due to medical errors [1]
  • $20.8 Billion annually in additional (direct) healthcare costs [2]
  • $250 Billion annually in additional (indirect) healthcare costs [2]

One of the best ways to improve patient outcomes is to reduce the number of preventable adverse events. Pressure ulcers, skin wounds that are caused by sustained pressure on area of the skin – usually as a result of sitting or lying in the same position for long periods of time, are classified as a preventable adverse event.

“Prior to the implementation of Voalte there was a 10-step process to document and assess a pressure ulcer,” explained Jones. “With Voalte we were able to streamline the time and workflow related to pressure ulcers by 40%. Our Wound Care NRP is now able to be anywhere in the hospital and still be able to help patients and clinicians.” Something that would have been impossible with their legacy processes and communication technologies.

The streamlined process and improved communications not only improved patient outcomes, it also had an impact on staff morale and clinician burnout in two specific ways.

First, clinician workload is often cited as a leading cause of burnout. According to a JAMA study published last year, the 25% of physician that felt burnout cited the following contributing factors:

  • 1 percent felt their job environment led to symptoms of burnout
  • 1 percent felt a lack of time for documentation
  • 4 percent reported stress as a common factor
  • 1 percent reported spending time on electronic medical records (EMRs) at home was a significant contributor

When clinicians feel burnt out, it has an impact on patient safety. A Swiss study published in 2014 found a linkage between burnout and adverse events. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) issued the following comment on the study:

The investigators propose that the linkage between burnout and safety is driven by both a lack of motivation or energy and impaired cognitive function. In the latter case, they postulate that emotionally exhausted clinicians curtail performance to focus on only the most necessary and pressing tasks. Clinicians with burnout may also have impaired attention, memory, and executive function that decrease their recall and attention to detail. Diminished vigilance, cognitive function, and increased safety lapses place clinicians and patients at higher risk for errors. As burned out clinicians become cynically detached from their work, they may develop negative attitudes toward patients that promote a lack of investment in the clinician–provider interaction, poor communication, and loss of pertinent information for decision-making. Together these factors result in the burned out clinician having impaired capacity to deal with the dynamic and technically complex nature of ICU care effectively.

Second, by reducing the occurrence of adverse events at Valley Medical Cetner, Jones and his team were helping to reduce clinician anxiety and improve mental health. A report published in 2007 measured the emotional impact on physician that were involved in an adverse event or near miss (adverse events that were caught BEFORE harm came to a patient). The findings were stark:

Source: The Emotional Impact of Medical Errors on Practicing Physicians in the United States and Canada

This study, combined with the prior body of work, shows that there is a “virtuous cycle of benefit” when it comes to burnout and adverse events. Reducing workload and improving morale means clinicians are less likely to feel burned out which in turn means they are less likely to be involved in an adverse event, which means they are less likely to suffer the deep negative emotions associated with medical errors…and round and round it goes.

The team at Valley Medical Cetner is beginning to reap the benefits of being in this cycle. By focusing on improving communications, streamlining documentation requirements and reducing skin-integrity related adverse events, they are directly impacting a key contributing factor to burnout.

“Our goal is to help make it easy for clinicians to do the right thing for patients,” said Jones. “Clinicians are on the front lines. It’s the job of IT to give them the tools and the resources they need to be successful.”

For Valley Medical Center, one of those tools was the Voalte Platform which simplifies care team communication and collaboration. Deployed through smartphones, the Voalte solution gives physicians, nurses and administrators a secure way to communicate via voice and text within the walls of the hospital – eliminating the need for pages over the PA system.

Jones disclosed that Valley Medical Center chose the Voalte Platform because they believed “it was the best platform to help clinicians” and that culturally the team at Voalte was the one most closely aligned to Valley Medical Center’s patient-first approach.

“Voalte was really great to work with,” Jones stated. “They helped us through the transition and through the change management process. They were there in the command center, working alongside us during the initial roll-out. That was huge. It really helped with buy-in and with addressing the small changes that came up during that roll-out.”

In the three months following the roll-out, Valley Medical Center saved more than $50,000 just on their Renal Respiratory Unit and their patient satisfaction scores climbed to the 99th percentile.

Better patient experience. Improved patient outcomes. Lower costs. Reduced workloads. Valley Medical Center has definitely scored a quadruple-win.

You can watch my interview with James Jones on the Healthcare Scene YouTube channel or the embedded video below.

Voalte is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene.

TigerConnect Successfully Rebrands in Just 9 Months

Posted on April 16, 2018 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

Rebranding is not easy. Rebranding a well-established company that has become synonymous with a form of healthcare communication is even harder. Executing that rebrand in just 9 months while simultaneously preparing for healthcare’s biggest event – the annual HIMSS conference – is a near impossible task. Yet that’s what the team at TigerText, now TigerConnect, pulled off earlier this year.

At HIMSS18, TigerText became TigerConnect. Along with the new name came a new logo – albeit one with a clear homage to their company’s past. The new logo features a cleaner font style and a clever graphic element. If you look closely you will see that the graphic is four interlocking C’s which represent the company’s goal – Connected, Clinical, Communications, and Collaboration. The four colors are meant to represent the four different members of the care team: Doctors, Nurses, Allied Health Professionals, and Patients.

“The old brand was really about texting and compliance,” explained Kelli Castellano, Chief Marketing Officer for TigerConnect. “Not only was the word ‘text’ front and center, but our old brand also had a text box with a lock symbol as the main graphic. You couldn’t get more literal than that. When we first started, we were focused on being the best secure texting and compliance solution in the market. We sold to healthcare compliance officers and to CIOs. The TigerText brand personified that focus and it really served us well.”

But then in 2016, the company launched a new clinical workflow solution called TigerFlow.

“When we showed TigerFlow to prospects it was well received,” Castellano continued. “But people would leave the meeting wondering why their texting company was talking to them about clinical workflow. Worse, many clinicians were confused on being invited to a meeting with TigerText – a company they viewed as a technology infrastructure provider.”

By early 2017, after a few months of research and introspection, the team realized that the company name and brand was holding them back. It was simply too much to ask their target audience, which now included clinical decision makers like CMOs, CMIOs and CNOs, to see the company as anything more than a texting platform.

Castellano and the rest of the Marketing Team knew that rebranding the company would be risky. After all, hundreds of thousands of users click the TigerText logo each day on their phones to communicate securely with their peers. “TigerTexting” had even become a verb used by their customers to describe the act of sending messages through their system.

To gain buy-in and build internal momentum for a rebrand, Castellano asked her team to “do the research” and gather feedback from stakeholders including: customers, board advisors, partners and staff. They found there was consensus for changing the TigerText name.

After three months of work, Castellano and her team, with the support of Co-Founder and CEO, Brad Brooks, officially began the rebranding initiative.

It was now the end of spring 2017 and Castellano set an ambitious goal of launching the new brand at HIMSS18 – only 9 months away. “It was definitely an audacious goal,” admitted Castellano. “But we all knew that it just had to get done. Our Sales Team needed it. Our company needed it. We just had to move forward.”

Castellano allocated half of her ten person team to work on the rebrand while the other half worked on HIMSS18 pre-show marketing and building up their sales funnel. Everything came together and on March 6th the new brand was revealed.

CEO Brooks explained the new name this way: “Our new name – TigerConnect – allows us to clearly articulate the true value our solutions deliver. We connect care teams, existing data systems, and ultimately healthcare communities across a centralized and highly scalable clinical messaging platform. It is this real-time connection to data and people that dramatically improves the way healthcare organizations communicate to drive better results. We wanted that value to be reflected in our name and brand icon which are 4 interlocking C’s that represent Connected Clinical Communication and Collaboration.”

According to Castellano the reaction internally has been overwhelmingly positive. “We gave our staff a preview of the new brand in January. Everyone was very proud and happy with the new name. It was fresh and new, yet it still had a nod to our heritage and roots. Everyone felt that the new brand would allow us to better position the company and elevate the conversations we were having.”

“The reaction at HIMSS was also very positive,” noted Brooks. “The name change gave us the opportunity to talk about our story. We talked about where we had been and where we were going. It was really a lightbulb moment for visitors to the booth. We got a lot of ‘Aha…that makes sense’ comments.”

Having led three rebranding initiatives at three different companies, I applaud Castellano and her team for achieving their goal in such a short time frame. To do it on top of preparing for HIMSS is simply incredible.

It will be interesting to track the growth of TigerConnect in the years to come to see if the rebrand helps the company reach its desired financial results.

#HIMSS18 Mix Tape

Posted on February 14, 2018 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

The annual HIMSS conference is the “Super Bowl” of HealthIT events. No other conference brings together as many HealthIT professionals, vendors and industry media in one place. The 2018 edition of HIMSS (#HIMSS18) is being held in Las Vegas NV and over 48,000 attendees are expected. Healthcare Scene is holding a whole series of open meetups at HIMSS18 where anyone can come and participate in the discussion so we hope to see you there.

For the past 3 years I have done something fun ahead of the conference. I asked a handful of industry experts and social media friends to choose a song that best represents healthcare and HealthIT. I published the resulting playlist along with their reasons for their selection. I dubbed it (excuse the pun) the #HIMSS Mix Tape.

Why a mix tape? Three main reasons:

  1. I’m a big comic book nerd and have been since I was a kid. In the recent Guardians of the Galaxy movies (which I’m a fan of) the hero carries around an old Sony Walkman and plays a mix tape that his mother made for him. My mix tape is a hat tip to these movies.
  2. Playlists are so 2000s. Mix tape has an exotic sounding quality to. Honestly which headline is more intriguing: HIMSS18 Playlist or HIMSS18 Mix Tape? Plus how to do you choose a graphic of a playlist?
  3. I have made one or two mix tapes in my day and there is a lost feeling of accomplishment you get when you painstaking cut songs together for a beach party, road-trip or for that special someone. The HIMSS Mix Tape is my attempt to re-live those youthful memories.

For past HIMSS Mix Tapes, check out these links:

This year, I decided to expand the Mix Tape to two volumes. Volume 1 is filled with songs chosen by fellow HIMSS18 Social Media Ambassadors (this is my 3rd year as a HIMSS SMA). Volume 2 is full of tunes from people I have become friends with because of HIMSS.

So without further ado, the HIMSS18 Mix Tape…please enjoy responsibly.

[Note: I put together this Spotify Playlist that has all the songs.]

Volume 1 – DJ SMA

Pushin’ Forward Back – Temple of the Dog. Chosen by Brian Eastwood, @Brian_Eastwood

Pretty self explanatory, but 2017 seemed like another year where health IT started to make progress but then had to take a step back and reassess where it had gone and where it wanted to go.

Mr. Blue Sky – Electric Light Orchestra. Chosen by Brian Mack, @BFMack

It is an affirmation of all that has been accomplished in the last year, and a tribute to the committed professionals, advocates, and stakeholders across the Health IT industry. Their positive contributions ARE having a significant impact on the quality of healthcare access, delivery, experience, outcomes, and affordability.

Westworld Season 1 Opening Credits – HBO. Chosen by Chuck Webster MD, MSIE, MSIS, @wareFLO

What about the 3D printing technology depicted? The drawing of three-dimensional muscles and sinews. And the artificial intelligence? Creative, problem-solving, communicating artificially intelligent beings? Which (who?) begin to learn, and perhaps surpass, their human creators? I can’t think of a short stretch of music more capturing emerging health IT themes and anxieties, from 3D printing to machine learning, to bridging software vs hardware divides, to reflecting on what is human about technology and what technology means for humanity.

What About Us – P!nk. Chosen by Colin Hung, @Colin_Hung

I chose this song as an anthem for: patients who have not been listened to; for caregivers who are suffering without support; for people + families dealing with rare diseases; for clinicians and other healthcare staff who are burned out; and for anyone who cannot get access to the care they need.

We are problems that want to be solved / We are children that need to be loved / We were willin’, we came when you called / But, man, you fooled us, enough is enough, oh

Street Life – The Crusaders & Randy Crawford. Chosen by Danielle Siarri, @innonurse

In healthcare people that live on the streets need more most care and their voice is not heard and this song just reminds me of the unseen patient. In the ED I would take care of prostitutes, IV drug users, pimps to homeless and the mentally ill that live on the streets. This song reminds me of them and the clinical staff that takes care of them.

North American Scum – LCD Soundsystem. Chosen by David Harlow, @healthblawg

This song sums up the dismay many of us feel with the current political situation. “I don’t know … where to begin …/ But in the end we make the same mistakes all over again/ Come on North Americans/ We are North American scum.” On the Health IT front, while there is surely progress being made, in a sense we are still making the same mistakes all over again. We could be farther along than we are towards achieving the quadruple aim if we would shed some of our chains, chief among them being the low level of interoperability enjoyed in the field.

Beautiful Day – U2. Chosen by Geeta Nayyar, @gnayyar

Despite this frustration with the constant rhetoric of the past few years, I hold on to the view that there is so much to be excited about in HIT. I really want to elevate the positive action happening right now all around us. Let’s work to move the conversations forward by highlighting the positive momentum happening in HIT – the developments that are making a difference, that unite rather than separate and those that are taking courageous first steps into new territory. We know what must be done, so let’s do it. This will be a beautiful day.

Sweet Dreams – Eurythmics (Ibiza Deep Summer Remix 2015). Chosen by Janae Sharp, @coherencemed

I like it because this year has seen good and bad in HealthIT – we’ve seen consolidation and progress and a lot of noise and it remains to be seen what will happen in the future. Also it’s a throwback from the old days of when ai first started getting traction. The original version is from the early 80s (timing isn’t exact) and then it’s been re-done before. So this time- we have a techno remix. Time will tell if it turns out to be life changing- in the meantime we have dancing.

All You Need Is Love  – The Beatles. Chosen by Jane Sarasohn-Kahn, @healthythinker

For two reasons: (1) “There’s nothing you can make that can’t be made,” like health; and, (2) Love is the killer app. Just sayin’.

I Won’t Back Down – Tom Petty and The Heartbreakers. Chosen by Linda Stotsky, @EMRAnswers

His song personifies our continued struggle for healthcare transformation, care coordination and usability. I am saying the same thing I’ve said for 15 years. But “I’ll stand my ground, no I won’t back down” until the healthcare paradigm changes – and improvements occur.

Dark Horse – Katy Perry. Chosen by Lygeia Ricciardi, @Lygeia

There are a lot of new entrants in the mix or on the horizon in healthcare and health IT these days: Amazon, Google, and Berkshire Hathaway, to name few. Industry lines are blurring every day—it’s a “perfect storm” to change things up in healthcare, and the dark horses joining the traditional race represent both the risks and opportunities of the unknown.

Mz. Hyde – Halestorm. Chosen by Matt Fisher, @matt_r_fisher

Healthcare and HealthIT certainly feel like there is a bit of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde going on. The goal of healthcare is to help people, but the dark side (at least to some degree) of regulation and missed expectations take away the focus from the positive. Which side will control? That remains an open question, though the positive is always striving to stay ahead.

Brave – Sarah Bareilles. Chosen by Max Stroud, @mmaxwellstroud

As the conversation across the nation grew around the issue of sexual harassment and sexual assault, it resonated with those in our own community who have had similar experiences. Be brave.

With what you want to say / And let the words fall out / Honestly I wanna see you be brave

Ordinary Love – U2. Chosen by Nick van Terheyden, @drnic1

Probably like many people I feel like I’m in the Line of Fire [Junip]…”What you choose to believe in, Takes you as you fall, No one else around you, No one to understand you, No one to hear your calls”. In fact “This world at times will blind you, Still I know I’ll see you there” – Come a Little Closer [Cage the Elephant] but  “I found my nirvana in a friend of mine” with the edgy “H” [Lawrence Rothman]. But ultimately “the world I love, the tears I drop, To be part of the wave Can’t Stop” [Red Hot Chili Peppers] and I end up with Ordinary Love – U2

The sea throws rock together / But time leaves us polished stones / We can’t fall any further / If we can’t feel ordinary love

Despacito – Luis Fonsi. Chosen by Rasu Shrestha, MD MBA, @RasuShrestha

I wanted to choose a hit song from the past year; and just kept bumping into one Ed Sheeran hit after another. While I love his heart tugging melodies, I am going with another popular hit. Despacito means “Slowly”; and that essentially is how I feel we’re making, and will continue to make, progress in health IT. Getting health IT “right” needs to be a dance – rhythmic, upbeat, fun, purposeful and passionate. Yup, flip Despacito on and turn that bass up please!

Join Together – The Who. Chosen by Sean Erreger, @StuckonSW

I am attending HIMSS this year on mission to find out how tech can better facilitate interdisciplinary care. Looking forward to the knocking down silo theme of this song. “Do you really think I care, What you eat or what you wear…Won’t you join together with the band

Anticipation – Carly Simon. Chosen by Tamara StClaire, @drstclaire

Given the new administration in the US, we don’t really now all that’s going to happen. We have a good feel for what the current administration would like to have happen…but no one will actually know until after mid-term elections. And whatever will happen will impact all of healthcare.

Volume 2 – HealthIT Fresh Tracks

Monty Python and the Holy Grail Monks. Chosen by Regina Holliday, @ReginaHolliday

I chose this because you cannot go wrong when you quote Monty Python, I also feel that we smacking are heads on a regular basis in HealthIT.

Okay – The Piano Guys. Chosen by John Lynn, @techguy

There’s a lot of craziness in the world including in healthcare IT, but it’s gonna be ok.  With all the bad in the world, there’s also a ton of good things and good people that just don’t get the recognition they deserve.

Pumpin’ Blood – Nonono. Chosen by Melody Smith Jones, @TheSameMel

Because 2018 is a year of exciting beginnings for me. While fear is unavoidable in the face of true challenge, I feel in charge of my destiny. I also have this amazing Health IT community whistling along with me as our journeys merge and build from each other.

This is Me – Keala Settle (The Greatest Showman). Chosen by Jennifer Dennard @JennDennard

It’s my favorite movie right now. I’ve seen it twice and will likely see it a third time in the theater. The movie – and song – leave you feeling so empowered. Definitely resonates with the #healthITchicks community right now!

Born To Be Wild – Steppenwolf. Chosen by Joe Babaian, @JoeBabaian

HealthIT is very much still out on the highway, looking for adventure! Many opportunities and sights to see as we find and amplify the best we find. Truly HealthIT is born to be wild and flying high – it’s up to us to keep collaborating and bring healthcare into the future!

No – Meghan Trainor. Chosen by Sarah Bennight, @sarahbennight

As patients start demanding better experiences in healthcare like telemedicine, online record access, integration and collaboration between care team members, they have started saying NO when they don’t get what they want as informed consumers. My name is-NO! My address is-NO, my number is-NO, you should already know! Girl. if that facility doesn’t give you what you need, blah blah blah, just be like nah to the ah to the no, no no!

As Crazy As It Is – ZHU ft A Track & Keznamdi. Chosen by Sidonia Rose Swarm, @SidoniaRose

In order to infuse some much-needed chill reggae vibes into a chaotic HIMSS week, I thought “As Crazy As It Is” is a fitting choice. Most people in Health IT feel the red tape, long sales cycles, and integration hurdles make them “crazy” yet they stick around and could never abandon the frustrating yet fulfilling industry.

Despacito – Luis Fonsi and Daddy Yankee feat Justin Bieber. Chosen by Jennifer Lannon, @HealthTechJen

I chose Despacito – because innovation and technology development and deployment happen very despacito (slowly!). I also chose it to bring a bit of fun flair into the HIMSS scene – and bring some Spanish-speaking & Latino/a culture, which in my experience is severely underrepresented among healthcare and technology leadership.

Radioactive – Imagine Dragons. Chosen by Dan Dunlop, @dandunlop

Welcome to the new age /  Welcome to the new age /  This is it… The Apocalypse

I like this song because it captures the tension I see in the Health IT space – and the divergent perspectives about Health IT. It is definitely a new age. But is it the Apocalypse? Is the future bleak or bright? Will IT enrich the work life of the physician or enslave them? Will IT free providers to spend more time with patients or disconnect them? This is the tension that this song evokes for me.

Heroes – David Bowie. Chosen by Mandi Bishop, @MandiBPro

It’s a reminder of our (health IT) youth, when we were invincible (and unicorns were everywhere). That was a heady feeling, and it gave us the inspiration and momentum to carry us through our rocky adolescence. Now that we’re older and wiser, we can find new – perhaps more effective and widely adopted – ways to be heroes…

Starman – David Bowie. Chosen by Andrew Richards @AndrewinTech

Things are changing and we are all going to have our minds blown by whats ahead. And…Elon Musk just sent a starman in a tesla into space!

digituRN – Ross Martin. Chosen by Ross D Martin, @RossMartin

Is it total self-promotion to offer an original song? [Editors note: Nope and I think the lyrics speak for themselves]

Enter Sandman – Metallica. Chosen by Nick Adkins, @nickisnpdx

Take my hand / We’re off to never never-land / Take my hand / We’re off to never never-land

Keep repeating that over and over and over……cuz that’s exactly what’s FINALLY happening in a BIG way this year with the industry getting WOKE! Go Apple, Amazon, JPM, Berkshire Hathaway, et al!

Too Close – Alex Clare. Chosen by Shereese Maynard, @ShereesePubHlth

Every year, I spend the year, trying to find synergy w/ vendors, whose product disappoints me on delivery. Prior to HIMSS, they usually beg, promote, and insists we get together. I’ve said it before; I’m still looking to be impressed.

Won’t Get Fooled Again – The Who. Chosen by Gregg Masters @2healthguru

Because like clockwork we always do in healthcare.

 

Got a song that you think represents healthcare or HealthIT? Add it to the comments and it will become Volume 3!

PointClickCare Tackling Readmissions from Long-Term and Post-Acute Care Facilities Head-On

Posted on January 12, 2018 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

Transitioning from an acute care to a long-term/post-acute care (LTPAC) facility can be dangerous.

According to one study, nearly 23% of patients discharged from a hospital to a LTPAC facility had at least 1 readmission. Research indicates that the leading cause of readmission is harm caused by medication (called an adverse drug event). Studies have shown that as much as 56% of all medication errors happen at a transitional point of care.

By the year 2050 more than 27 million Americans will be using LTPAC services. The majority of these LTPAC patients will transition from an acute care facility at least once each year. With this many transitions, the number of medication errors each year would balloon into the millions. The impact on patients and on the healthcare system itself would be astronomical.

Thankfully there is a solution: medication reconciliation

The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) states: “Patients frequently receive new medications or have medications changed during hospitalizations. Lack of medication reconciliation results in the potential for inadvertent medication discrepancies and adverse drug events—particularly for patients with low health literacy, or those prescribed high-risk medications or complex medication regimens.”

Medication reconciliation is a process where an accurate list of medications a patient is taking is maintained at all times. That list is compared to admission, transfer and/or discharge orders at all transitional points both within a facility and between facilities. By seeing orders vs existing medications, clinicians and caregivers are able to prevent drug-interactions and complications due to omissions or dosage discrepancies.

What is surprising is the lack of progress in this area.

We have been talking about interoperability for years in HealthIT. Hundreds of vendors make announcements at the annual HIMSS conference about their ability to share data. Significant investments have been made in Health Information Exchanges (HIEs). Yet despite all of this, there has been relatively little progress made or coverage given to this problem of data exchange between hospitals and LTPAC facilities.

One company in the LTPAC space is working to change that. PointClickCare, one of the largest EHR providers to skilled nursing facilities, home care providers and senior living centers in North America, is dedicating resources and energy to overcoming the challenge of data sharing – specifically for medication reconciliation.

“We are tackling the interoperability problem head-on,” says Dave Wessinger, co-founder and Chief Operating Officer at PointClickCare. “The way we see it, there is absolutely no reason why it can take up to three days for an updated list of medications to arrive at our customer’s facility from a hospital. In that time patients are unnecessarily exposed to potential harm. That’s unacceptable and we are working with our customers and partners to address it.”

Over the past 12 months, the PointClickCare team has made significant progress integrating their platform with other players in the healthcare ecosystem – hospitals, pharmacies, HIEs, ACOs, physician practices and labs. According to Wessinger, PointClickCare is now at a point where they have “FHIR-ready” APIs and web-services.

“We believe that medication reconciliation is the key to getting everyone in the ecosystem to unlock their data,” continues Wessinger. “There is such a tremendous opportunity for all of us in the healthcare vendor community to work together to solve one of the biggest causes of hospital readmissions.”

Amie Downs, Senior Director ISTS Info & App Services at Good Samaritan Society, an organization that operates 165 skilled nursing facilities in 24 states and a PointClickCare customer, agrees strongly with Wessinger: “We have the opportunity to make medication reconciliation our first big interoperability win as an industry. We need a use-case that shows benefit. I can’t think of a better one than reducing harm to patients while simultaneously preventing costly readmissions. I think this can be the first domino so to speak.”

Having the technology infrastructure in place is just part of the challenge. Getting organizations to agree to share data is a significant hurdle and once you get organizations to sit down with each other, the challenge is resisting the temptation just to dump data to each other. Downs summed it up this way:

“What is really needed is for local acute care facilities to partner with local long-term and post-acute care facilities. We need to sit down together and pick the data that we each want/need to provide the best care for patients. We need to stop just sending everything to each other through a direct connection, on some sort of encrypted media that travels with the patient, via fax or physically printed on a piece of paper and then expecting the other party to sort it out.”

Downs goes on to explain how narrowing the scope of data exchange is beneficial: “I definitely see a strong future for CCDA data exchange to help in medication reconciliation. Right now medication information is just appended to the file we receive from acute care facilities. We need to agree on what medication information we really need. Right now, we get the entire medication history of the patient. What we really need is just the active medications that the patient is on.”

In addition to working on FHIR and APIs, BJ Boyle, Director of Product Management at PointClickCare, is also leading a data sharing initiative for those instances when there is no fellow EHR platform to connect to. “We are working towards something that is best described as a ‘Post-Acute Care Cloud’ or ‘PAC Cloud’,” explains Boyle. “We’re designing it so that hospital case managers can go to a single place and get all the information they need from the various SNFs they refer patients to. Today, when HL7 integration isn’t possible, case managers have to be given authorized access to the SNF’s system. That’s not ideal.”

PointClickCare has already taken an initial step towards this vision with an offering called eINTERACT. According to the company’s website eINTERACT allows for the “early identification of changes in condition…and the sooner a change in condition is identified, the quicker interventions can be implemented to prevent decline and avoid potential transfers” which is key to managing patient/resident health.

It’s worth noting that John Lynn blogged about LTPAC readmissions in 2014. Unfortunately at the macro/industry level, not much has changed. Dealing with readmissions from LTPAC facilities is not particularly exciting. Much of the attention remains with consumer-monitoring devices, apps and gadgets around the home.

Having said that, I do find it encouraging to see real progress being made by companies like PointClickCare and Good Samaritan Society. I hope to find more examples of practical interoperability that impacts patient care while touring the HIMSS18 exhibit floor in early March. In the meantime, I will be keeping my eye on PointClickCare and the LTPAC space to see how these interoperability initiatives progress.

Using Geography to Combat the Opioid Crisis

Posted on January 10, 2018 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

When it comes to the opioid crisis, the numbers aren’t good. According to the latest CDC numbers, over 66,000 Americans died from drug overdoses between May 2016 and May 2017. Unfortunately this continues the rapid upward trend over the past five years.

Credit: New York Times, The First Count of Fentanyl Deaths in 2016: Up 540% in Three Years, 2 Sept 2017, https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/09/02/upshot/fentanyl-drug-overdose-deaths.html

One of the biggest drivers for this increase is the prevalence of opioids – a class of drugs that includes pain medications, heroin and fentanyl (a synthetic opioid). The opioid crisis is not the stereotypical street-drug problem. It is not confined to inner cities or to any socio-economic boundaries. It affects all neighborhoods…and therein lies one of the greatest challenges of dealing with the crisis, knowing where to deploy precious resources.

As governments and public health authorities begin to take more aggressive action, some are wisely turning to geographic information systems (GIS) in order to determine where the need is greatest. GIS (also called geospatial mapping) are designed specifically to capture, store, manage and analyze geographical data. It has been a mainstay in mining, engineering and environmental sciences since the early 1990’s. For more information about GIS, please see this excellent PBS documentary. In recent years, GIS has been applied to a number of new areas including healthcare.

Esri is one of the companies doing pioneering GIS work in healthcare and recently they have focused on applying their ArcGIS technology to help tackle the opioid crisis. “One of the basic challenges that public health authorities face is clearly defining the scope of the opioid problem in their local area.” says Estella Geraghty MD, Chief Medical Officer & Health Solutions Director at Esri. “The good news is that the information to map the extent of the problem is available, it’s just stored in disparate systems and in incompatible formats. We help bring it all together.”

Geraghty points to their work with the Tri-County Health Department (TCHD) as an example of how effective GIS can be. TCHD is one of the largest public health agencies in the US, serving 1.5 million residents in three of Denver’s metropolitan counties: Adams, Arapahoe and Douglas. Using Esri’s ArcGIS solution, TCHD created an open data site that allows internal teams and external partners to pool and share their opioid health information using a visual map of the region as a common base of reference.

According to Esri: “Since the creation of the Open Data site, there has been a dramatic increase in both the information available to the public and the community’s understanding of the opioid crisis.” You can see the Open Data site here and if you scroll down you will see six different maps available to the public. Particularly sobering is the Opioid Overdose Deaths from 2011-2016, which allows you to zoom in down to specific streets/blocks. Another interesting map is the Household Medication Take-Back Locations which seems to indicate there is a lack of coverage for the city of Denver.

Esri itself has created its own site to bring attention to the opioid crisis at a national level. Two maps in particular stand out to me. The first is the map of Opioid Prescriptions per Provider. The red zones on that map represent areas where a high number of opioid prescriptions are being made by relatively few providers. This points to potential areas where opioid abuse may be occurring.

By mapping the data in this way, some interesting insights emerge. Take Taliaferro County in Georgia for example where 2,069 claims out of a total of 29,016 were for opioids, yet the county only has 2 providers. Or Clinch County in Georgia where a whopping 10% of all claims were for opioids.

The second interesting map is Lost Loved Ones (located at the bottom of the Esri site). This is a completely open map where anyone can pay tribute to a loved one who has been lost to the opioid crisis. Each dot is a person – a stark reminder that behind each statistic is a son, daughter, mother, or father who has died from opioids. Anyone can add to the map by clicking the button at the top of the map.

There is something to be said about seeing data overlaid onto an interactive map. It takes data from abstract lines, bars or numbers on a page and transforms it into something more tangible, more “real”. I suspect that for many on the front lines of this crisis, having the opioid data visualized in this manner helps to drive home the need for additional resources.

“Esri is helping public health officials all over the country make better decisions,” continued Geraghty. “We are helping them determine if they have enough coverage for places where people can drop off expired drugs, places where Naloxone is available and mental health program coverage. We can visually present the types of drugs being dropped off by region. We can track where first responders have had to use Naloxone. We plan on continuing to collaborate closely with customers, especially with public health authorities. This opioid crisis is impacting so many neighborhoods. We can make a difference.”

Given the continued upward trend in opioid-related deaths, healthcare can use all the difference makers it can get.

Excitement Mixed with Realism at Top Of Mind 2018

Posted on December 18, 2017 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

The recent #TopOfMind2018 conference hosted by the Center of Connected Medicine was one of the best events of 2017. A stellar lineup of speakers was matched by an equally outstanding group of attendees. Together this combination created an atmosphere of realistic excitement – a unique mixture of exuberant enthusiasm for the latest healthcare technology (Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, Cybersecurity, Home Monitoring) tempered by sobering doses of reality (lack of patient access and poor usability).

One of the most engaging presentations was delivered by Jini Kim, Founder and CEO at Nuna. She opened by recounting her hilarious first-ever conversation with President Obama. Very early one morning (around 3am PT), Kim got a call on her cell phone from an unknown Washington number. When she answered the person on the other end introduced himself as President Obama. Kim reacted as I’m sure many of us would – with disbelief – and said as much to the caller. Obama laughed and said “I get that a lot, but seriously this is the President of the United States and I’m calling because your country needs you”. Kim compared that moment to feeling like a superhero being invited to join the Avengers.

Kim was one of six people handpicked by the President and his advisors to fix the failed Healthcare.gov website. For the incredible behind-the-scenes look at how this team was recruited and how they fixed the site, check out this amazing Time article.

In front of a slide that showed her company’s mantra, “Every row of data is a life whose story should be told with dignity”, Kim told story after story about how healthcare organizations would bring her in to help solve difficult healthcare problems. What Kim realized through that work was how badly health data is stored, protected and used.

In project after project, her team was tasked with bringing order to data chaos. One of the biggest challenges they encountered over and over again was bringing together massive amounts of data that was stored in different formats and used different terminologies.

Kim’s presentation was an effective counterbalance to the presenters just before her who had spoken excitedly about the future of Artificial Intelligence (AI). She cautioned the #TopOfMind2018 audience not to get too distracted by the shiny new AI object.

So much work needs to be done on the basics first before we can effectively apply AI. We need to get back to basics: data integrity and data cleansing. It’s not sexy, but if we don’t fix that then the more advanced technologies that layer on top will simply not work.

The session presented by Erin Moore, patient advocate and healthcare innovation consultant, made the biggest impact on the audience. For 45 minutes, she shared her deeply personal healthcare story, which started when her son Drew was diagnosed with cystic fibrosis seven years ago. Moore took the audience on an emotional roller coaster ride that mirrored her own family’s journey – from small wins (finding a doctor who would listen) to draining setbacks (medications changed without explanation) and from serendipitous windfalls (a researcher sent her an app that encouraged Drew to take his medication) to scratch-your-head moments (having to manually build Drew’s medical record by going to each provider and filling out forms in order for the information to be released).

There were two memorable takeaways from Moore’s presentation. First, was her story of how eye-opening it was for Susanna Fox, then Chief Technology Officer of the US Department of Health and Human Services, to spend the day shadowing Drew (virtually). Whenever Drew had to take his medication, Fox would pop a Tic-Tac. 500 Tic-Tacs and multiple hours waiting for appointments later, Fox had a new appreciation for how all-consuming it was to be the caregiver to someone who has cystic fibrosis. You can read more about Fox’s experience in her revealing blog post.

Second, was Moore’s double challenge to the audience:

  • To truly walk a mile in your end-users world when creating/designing the next generation products.
  • To make products truly interoperable.

The best unscripted moment of #TopOfMind2018 came from Amy Edgar, a #pinksocks #hcldr #TheWalkingGallery member. In one of the early Q&A sessions, she asked the speaker “How do we prevent digital health from becoming the next snake oil”. For a moment there was stunned silence as the room absorbed the full weight of Edgar’s comment.

For the rest of the day #TopOfMind2018 master of ceremonies Rasu Shrestha and other presenters made reference to snake oil. Edgar’s comment was even the inspiration for a recent HCLDR tweetchat that followed on the heels of the conference.

Overall #TopOfMind2018 was one of my most memorable conference experiences of 2018. The presentations were interesting. The venue was fantastic. Everything ran smoothly. Above all the people at the event were amazing.

Special Note: Thank you to Larry Gioia for organizing an amazing meetup during #TopOfMind2018 that was inclusive of #HITsm #HITMC #HCLDR #pinksocks and #TheWalkingGallery

What are you #HITThankful for?

Posted on November 23, 2017 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

It’s Thanksgiving in the US and for many this means spending time with family and friends over insane amounts of cooked poultry (or tofu for our vegetarian friends). It is also the time to stop and think about all the things we are thankful for.

This year, Brian Mack @BFMack, Marketing & Communications manager at Great Lakes Health Connect and member of the #HITsm #HITMC and #hcldr communities, started the #HITThankful hashtag as way for people to share what they are thankful for in HealthIT.

From the tweets that have been shared it’s clear that being thankful for family is at the top of the list, but there have also been many who have been thankful for supportive coworkers and online friends.

This year I am tremendously thankful for the support of all my friends and colleagues in healthcare and HealthIT. I seriously would not have made it through the year had it not been for the encouragement and thoughtfulness of friends like John Lynn, Rasu Shrestha, Joe Babaian, Robert Blount, Nick Adkins, Regina Holliday, Nick van Terheyden, Sarah Bennight, Amy Hamilton, Brittany Quemby, Erin Wold, Cristina Dafonte, Janae Sharp, Tim Kinner, Dennis Nasto, Steve Nickerson, Daniel Kube and Colleen Young.

I got a wake-up call in the spring this year and it forced me to give serious thought to where I was heading professionally. Over the summer I must have spoken with at least 100 friends and family who all told me the same thing – it’s time that I get back to doing something I love doing. For me that’s helping small HealthIT companies grow into big ones. I’m thankful to have the opportunity now to pursue my passion.

I do have to give a special shout-out to John Lynn who has allowed me to contribute blogs to HealthcareScene.com and for believing in me. You are a true friend John and I’m so happy that we are now getting the chance to work together more closely.

I also have to thank everyone in the #hcldr #HITMC #HITsm #pinksocks #HTReads #HealthITChicks #HealthXPh #irishmed and #hcsmsa communities. All of you inspire me to keep the flame burning.

Happy Thanksgiving everyone!