Revenue Cycle Trends To Watch This Year

Posted on July 13, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

Revenue cycle management is something of a moving target. Every time you think you’ve got your processes and workflow in line, something changes and you have to tweak them again. No better example of that was the proposed changes to E/M that came out yesterday. While we wait for that to play out, here’s one look at the trends influencing RCM strategies this year, according to Healthcare IT leaders revenue cycle lead Larry Todd, CPA.

Mergers

As healthcare organizations merge, many legacy systems begin to sunset. That drives them to roll out new systems that can support organizational growth. Health leaders need to figure out how to retire old systems and embrace new ones during a revenue cycle implementation. “Without proper integrations, many organizations will be challenged to manage their reimbursement processes,” Todd says.

Claims denial challenges

Providers are having a hard time addressing claims denials and documentation to support appeals. RCM leaders need to find ways to tighten up these processes and reduce denial rates. They can do so either by adopting third-party systems or working within their own infrastructure, he notes.

CFO engagement

Any technology implementation will have an impact on revenue, so CFOs should stay engaged in the rollout process, he says. “These are highly technical projects, so there’s a tendency to hand over the reins to IT or the software vendor,” notes Todd, a former CFO. “But financial executives need to stay engaged throughout the project, including weekly implementation status updates.”

Providers should form a revenue cycle action team which includes all the stakeholders to the table, including the CFO and clinicians, he says. If the CFO is involved in this process, he or she can offer critical executive oversight of decisions made that impact A/R and cash.

User training and adoption

During the transition from a legacy system to a new platform, healthcare leaders need to make sure their staff are trained to use it. If they aren’t comfortable with the new system, it can mean trouble. Bear in mind that some employees may have used the legacy system for many years and need support as they make the transition. Otherwise, they may balk and productivity could fall.

Outside expertise

Given the complexity of rolling out new systems, it can help to hire experts who understand the technical and operational aspects of the software, along with organizational processes involved in the transition. “It’s very valuable to work with a consulting firm that employs real consultants – people who have worked in operations for years,” Todd concludes.