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BioUtah Life Sciences and Health Data Innovation

Posted on January 17, 2018 I Written By

Healthcare as a Human Right. Physician Suicide Loss Survivor. Janae writes about Artificial Intelligence, Virtual Reality, Data Analytics, Engagement and Investing in Healthcare. twitter: @coherencemed

Bio Utah is leading collaboration for Life Sciences in Utah that has shown great leadership both in connecting Utah companies with business interests in healthcare and improving life science research and education for schools. This includes a scholarship program for students that partners with local public and private schools including high schools and universities. Working together to improve the Utah economy was highlighted in their last one day event November 2, 2017 at the Grand America and I was honored to attend and hear from leaders in government, education and industry share their successes. Rob Etherington, CEO of Clene Nanomedicine, spoke about the success of BioUtah as fostering a shared culture of innovation.

One of the most innovative sessions I attended was the “Speed Dating of Health IT” pitching. Angel investors and representatives from banks and funds local to Utah sat at tables to meet a rotating cast of entrepreneurs, who shared their respective companies’ visions for real time feedback. I followed a group of three investors through a few rounds. One of the companies participating in the roundtable, Veristride, has a technology that is able to gather biomechanical data about walking, with the goal of ameliorating rehabilitation processes after injury or surgery, or for chronic condition management. This information can help reduce hospital readmission and inform better recovery planning.

In the current fitness-tracker obsessed market, Veristride’s background in physical therapy has facilitated the creation of a product that stands out in the market by recognizing one important truth: not all steps are equal. For instance, my able-bodied neighbor gets an insurance discount for having a certain number of steps each day, and has an insurance issued Fitbit. Every day during soccer practice, her 9-year-old son wears her Fitbit for her. She has never been at risk of not meeting her step goal. Veristride endeavors to close loopholes like these by finding better data about movement work. Their product may be one of the most unique offerings I’ve seen in a world of limitless tracking devices that universally seem to lack quality in their measuring tools. It is refreshing to see a company focused on gathering data about how patients move, rather than just tracking it.

I spoke to the Veristride CEO, Stacey Bamberg, about her efforts and about the Utah Biological Sciences ecosystem. She mentioned that it is great to have introductions to investors. Streamlining the process from  introductions to writing checks is the work of investment groups and support; the work of the companies begins after these round-table meetings. Scaling a company from early stage to market acceptance can be a laborious process.

Practice Practice Practice. Companies should practice introducing their offering and seek feedback from investors and customers at every opportunity. I loved the idea of matchmaking to quickly answer investors’ questions about a company’s size, structure, and most importantly, its unique product. Utah investors want to invest in innovative products that will improve the health of people in Utah, and this speed-dating approach yields an efficient way for investors and developers to connect. Innovative meetings and networking groups can help improve healthcare IT and all areas of life sciences at an accelerated pace.

Investors meet with entrepreneurs in a Speed Dating activity sponsored by USTAR at the BioUtah event

BioUtah is organizing more events designed to promote Utah Innovation. On March 1-3, 2018, BioUtah will hold another investor conference to connect entrepreneurs with Utah Investors, furthering their mission to build Utah’s Life Sciences ecosystem. You can register for the Investor Summit HERE.

The Importance of Good People Doing Good – Martin Luther King Day

Posted on January 15, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today in the US, we’re celebrating the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday. To celebrate the holiday, I thought it would be great to share some of Martin Luther King Jr.’s quotes. Many of the messages are relevant to the healthcare and illustrate what makes those working in healthcare so special.

PointClickCare Tackling Readmissions from Long-Term and Post-Acute Care Facilities Head-On

Posted on January 12, 2018 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

Transitioning from an acute care to a long-term/post-acute care (LTPAC) facility can be dangerous.

According to one study, nearly 23% of patients discharged from a hospital to a LTPAC facility had at least 1 readmission. Research indicates that the leading cause of readmission is harm caused by medication (called an adverse drug event). Studies have shown that as much as 56% of all medication errors happen at a transitional point of care.

By the year 2050 more than 27 million Americans will be using LTPAC services. The majority of these LTPAC patients will transition from an acute care facility at least once each year. With this many transitions, the number of medication errors each year would balloon into the millions. The impact on patients and on the healthcare system itself would be astronomical.

Thankfully there is a solution: medication reconciliation

The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) states: “Patients frequently receive new medications or have medications changed during hospitalizations. Lack of medication reconciliation results in the potential for inadvertent medication discrepancies and adverse drug events—particularly for patients with low health literacy, or those prescribed high-risk medications or complex medication regimens.”

Medication reconciliation is a process where an accurate list of medications a patient is taking is maintained at all times. That list is compared to admission, transfer and/or discharge orders at all transitional points both within a facility and between facilities. By seeing orders vs existing medications, clinicians and caregivers are able to prevent drug-interactions and complications due to omissions or dosage discrepancies.

What is surprising is the lack of progress in this area.

We have been talking about interoperability for years in HealthIT. Hundreds of vendors make announcements at the annual HIMSS conference about their ability to share data. Significant investments have been made in Health Information Exchanges (HIEs). Yet despite all of this, there has been relatively little progress made or coverage given to this problem of data exchange between hospitals and LTPAC facilities.

One company in the LTPAC space is working to change that. PointClickCare, one of the largest EHR providers to skilled nursing facilities, home care providers and senior living centers in North America, is dedicating resources and energy to overcoming the challenge of data sharing – specifically for medication reconciliation.

“We are tackling the interoperability problem head-on,” says Dave Wessinger, co-founder and Chief Operating Officer at PointClickCare. “The way we see it, there is absolutely no reason why it can take up to three days for an updated list of medications to arrive at our customer’s facility from a hospital. In that time patients are unnecessarily exposed to potential harm. That’s unacceptable and we are working with our customers and partners to address it.”

Over the past 12 months, the PointClickCare team has made significant progress integrating their platform with other players in the healthcare ecosystem – hospitals, pharmacies, HIEs, ACOs, physician practices and labs. According to Wessinger, PointClickCare is now at a point where they have “FHIR-ready” APIs and web-services.

“We believe that medication reconciliation is the key to getting everyone in the ecosystem to unlock their data,” continues Wessinger. “There is such a tremendous opportunity for all of us in the healthcare vendor community to work together to solve one of the biggest causes of hospital readmissions.”

Amie Downs, Senior Director ISTS Info & App Services at Good Samaritan Society, an organization that operates 165 skilled nursing facilities in 24 states and a PointClickCare customer, agrees strongly with Wessinger: “We have the opportunity to make medication reconciliation our first big interoperability win as an industry. We need a use-case that shows benefit. I can’t think of a better one than reducing harm to patients while simultaneously preventing costly readmissions. I think this can be the first domino so to speak.”

Having the technology infrastructure in place is just part of the challenge. Getting organizations to agree to share data is a significant hurdle and once you get organizations to sit down with each other, the challenge is resisting the temptation just to dump data to each other. Downs summed it up this way:

“What is really needed is for local acute care facilities to partner with local long-term and post-acute care facilities. We need to sit down together and pick the data that we each want/need to provide the best care for patients. We need to stop just sending everything to each other through a direct connection, on some sort of encrypted media that travels with the patient, via fax or physically printed on a piece of paper and then expecting the other party to sort it out.”

Downs goes on to explain how narrowing the scope of data exchange is beneficial: “I definitely see a strong future for CCDA data exchange to help in medication reconciliation. Right now medication information is just appended to the file we receive from acute care facilities. We need to agree on what medication information we really need. Right now, we get the entire medication history of the patient. What we really need is just the active medications that the patient is on.”

In addition to working on FHIR and APIs, BJ Boyle, Director of Product Management at PointClickCare, is also leading a data sharing initiative for those instances when there is no fellow EHR platform to connect to. “We are working towards something that is best described as a ‘Post-Acute Care Cloud’ or ‘PAC Cloud’,” explains Boyle. “We’re designing it so that hospital case managers can go to a single place and get all the information they need from the various SNFs they refer patients to. Today, when HL7 integration isn’t possible, case managers have to be given authorized access to the SNF’s system. That’s not ideal.”

PointClickCare has already taken an initial step towards this vision with an offering called eINTERACT. According to the company’s website eINTERACT allows for the “early identification of changes in condition…and the sooner a change in condition is identified, the quicker interventions can be implemented to prevent decline and avoid potential transfers” which is key to managing patient/resident health.

It’s worth noting that John Lynn blogged about LTPAC readmissions in 2014. Unfortunately at the macro/industry level, not much has changed. Dealing with readmissions from LTPAC facilities is not particularly exciting. Much of the attention remains with consumer-monitoring devices, apps and gadgets around the home.

Having said that, I do find it encouraging to see real progress being made by companies like PointClickCare and Good Samaritan Society. I hope to find more examples of practical interoperability that impacts patient care while touring the HIMSS18 exhibit floor in early March. In the meantime, I will be keeping my eye on PointClickCare and the LTPAC space to see how these interoperability initiatives progress.

Roche, GE Project Brings New Spin To Clinical Decision Support

Posted on January 10, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

The clinical decision support market is certainly crowded, and what’s more, CDS solutions vary in some important ways. On the other hand, one could be forgiven for feeling like they all look the same. Sorting out these technologies is not a job for the faint of heart.

That being said, it’s possible that the following partnership might offer something distinctive. Pharmaceutical giant Roche has signed a long-term partnership deal with GE Healthcare to jointly develop and market clinical decision support technology.

In a prepared statement, the two companies said they were developing a digital platform with a difference. The platform will use analytics to fuel workflow tools and apps and support clinical decisions. The platform will integrate a wide range of data, including patient records, medical best practices and recent research outcomes.

At least at the outset of their project, Roche and GE Healthcare are targeting oncology and critical care. With a pharmaceutical company and healthcare technology firm working together, providing tools for oncology specialists in particular makes a lot of sense.

The partners say that their product will give oncology care teams with multiple specialists a common data dashboard to review, which should help them collaborate on treatment decisions. Meanwhile, they plan to offer critical care physicians a dashboard integrating data from patient’ hospital monitoring equipment with their biomarker, genomic and sequencing data.

The idea of integrating new and possibly relevant information to the CDS platform is intriguing. It’s particularly interesting to imagine physicians leveraging genetic information to make real-time decisions. I think it’s safe to say that we’d all like it if CDS systems could bring the rudiments of precision medicine to thorny day-to-day clinical problems.

But the truth is, if my interactions with doctors mean anything, that few of them like CDS systems. Some have told me flat out that they end up overriding many CDS prompts, which arguably makes these very expensive systems almost irrelevant to hospital-based clinical practice. It’s hard to tell whether they would be willing to trust a new approach.

However, if GE and Roche can pull off what they’re pitching, it might just provide enough value it might convince them. Certainly, creating a more flexible dashboard which integrates data and office workflows is a large step in the right direction. And it’s probably fair to say that nothing like this exists in the market right now (as they claim).

Again, while there’s no guaranteed way to build out useful technology, bringing a pharma giant and a health IT giant might give both sides a leg up. I wonder how many users and patients they have involved in their design process. Let’s see if they can back up their promises.

Using Geography to Combat the Opioid Crisis

Posted on I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

When it comes to the opioid crisis, the numbers aren’t good. According to the latest CDC numbers, over 66,000 Americans died from drug overdoses between May 2016 and May 2017. Unfortunately this continues the rapid upward trend over the past five years.

Credit: New York Times, The First Count of Fentanyl Deaths in 2016: Up 540% in Three Years, 2 Sept 2017, https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/09/02/upshot/fentanyl-drug-overdose-deaths.html

One of the biggest drivers for this increase is the prevalence of opioids – a class of drugs that includes pain medications, heroin and fentanyl (a synthetic opioid). The opioid crisis is not the stereotypical street-drug problem. It is not confined to inner cities or to any socio-economic boundaries. It affects all neighborhoods…and therein lies one of the greatest challenges of dealing with the crisis, knowing where to deploy precious resources.

As governments and public health authorities begin to take more aggressive action, some are wisely turning to geographic information systems (GIS) in order to determine where the need is greatest. GIS (also called geospatial mapping) are designed specifically to capture, store, manage and analyze geographical data. It has been a mainstay in mining, engineering and environmental sciences since the early 1990’s. For more information about GIS, please see this excellent PBS documentary. In recent years, GIS has been applied to a number of new areas including healthcare.

Esri is one of the companies doing pioneering GIS work in healthcare and recently they have focused on applying their ArcGIS technology to help tackle the opioid crisis. “One of the basic challenges that public health authorities face is clearly defining the scope of the opioid problem in their local area.” says Estella Geraghty MD, Chief Medical Officer & Health Solutions Director at Esri. “The good news is that the information to map the extent of the problem is available, it’s just stored in disparate systems and in incompatible formats. We help bring it all together.”

Geraghty points to their work with the Tri-County Health Department (TCHD) as an example of how effective GIS can be. TCHD is one of the largest public health agencies in the US, serving 1.5 million residents in three of Denver’s metropolitan counties: Adams, Arapahoe and Douglas. Using Esri’s ArcGIS solution, TCHD created an open data site that allows internal teams and external partners to pool and share their opioid health information using a visual map of the region as a common base of reference.

According to Esri: “Since the creation of the Open Data site, there has been a dramatic increase in both the information available to the public and the community’s understanding of the opioid crisis.” You can see the Open Data site here and if you scroll down you will see six different maps available to the public. Particularly sobering is the Opioid Overdose Deaths from 2011-2016, which allows you to zoom in down to specific streets/blocks. Another interesting map is the Household Medication Take-Back Locations which seems to indicate there is a lack of coverage for the city of Denver.

Esri itself has created its own site to bring attention to the opioid crisis at a national level. Two maps in particular stand out to me. The first is the map of Opioid Prescriptions per Provider. The red zones on that map represent areas where a high number of opioid prescriptions are being made by relatively few providers. This points to potential areas where opioid abuse may be occurring.

By mapping the data in this way, some interesting insights emerge. Take Taliaferro County in Georgia for example where 2,069 claims out of a total of 29,016 were for opioids, yet the county only has 2 providers. Or Clinch County in Georgia where a whopping 10% of all claims were for opioids.

The second interesting map is Lost Loved Ones (located at the bottom of the Esri site). This is a completely open map where anyone can pay tribute to a loved one who has been lost to the opioid crisis. Each dot is a person – a stark reminder that behind each statistic is a son, daughter, mother, or father who has died from opioids. Anyone can add to the map by clicking the button at the top of the map.

There is something to be said about seeing data overlaid onto an interactive map. It takes data from abstract lines, bars or numbers on a page and transforms it into something more tangible, more “real”. I suspect that for many on the front lines of this crisis, having the opioid data visualized in this manner helps to drive home the need for additional resources.

“Esri is helping public health officials all over the country make better decisions,” continued Geraghty. “We are helping them determine if they have enough coverage for places where people can drop off expired drugs, places where Naloxone is available and mental health program coverage. We can visually present the types of drugs being dropped off by region. We can track where first responders have had to use Naloxone. We plan on continuing to collaborate closely with customers, especially with public health authorities. This opioid crisis is impacting so many neighborhoods. We can make a difference.”

Given the continued upward trend in opioid-related deaths, healthcare can use all the difference makers it can get.

Hospital Mobile Strategy Still In Flux

Posted on January 8, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

The following is a look at how hospitals’ use of communication devices has changed since 2011, and what the patterns are now.  You might be surprised to read some of these data points since in some cases they defy conventional wisdom.

The researchers behind the study, communications tech provider Spok, Inc. surveyed about 300 healthcare professionals this year, and have tracked such issues since 2011. The report captures data on the major transitions in hospital mobile communications that have taken place since then.

For example, the report noted that in 2011, 84% of staffers received job-related alerts on pagers. Sixty-two percent are using wireless in-house phones, 61% desk phones, 77% email on their computers, 44% cell phones and 5% other devices.

Since then, mobile device usage in hospitals has changed significantly. For example, 77% of respondents said that their hospital supports smartphone use. The popularity of some devices has come and gone over time, including tablets and Wi-Fi phones (which are nonetheless used by 63% of facilities).

Perhaps the reason this popularity has risen and fallen is that hospitals are still finding it tricky to support mobile devices. The issues include supporting needed infrastructure for Wi-Fi coverage (45%), managing cellular coverage infrastructure (30%), maintaining data security (31%) and offering IT support for users (about 30%). Only 11% of respondents said they were not facing any of these concerns at present.

When the researchers asked the survey panel which channels were best for sharing clinical information in a hospital, not all cited contemporary mobile devices. Yes, smartphones did get the highest reliability rating, at 3.66 out of five points, but pagers, including encrypted pagers, were in second place with a rating of 3.20. Overhead announcements came in third at 2.91 and EHR apps at 2.39.

The data on hospitals and BYOD policies seemed counterintuitive as well. According to Spok, 88% of facilities supported some form of BYOD in 2014, or in other words, roughly 9 out of 10.  That percentage has fallen drastically, however, BYOD support hitting 59% this year.

Not surprisingly, clinicians are getting the most leeway when it comes to using their own devices on campus. In 2017, 90% of respondents said they allowed their clinicians to bring their own devices with them. Another 69% supported BYOD for administrators, 57% for nurses and 56% for IT staffers. Clearly, hospital leaders aren’t thrilled about supporting mobility unless it keeps clinical staff aligned with the facility.

To control this cacophony of devices, 30% said they were using enterprise mobility management solutions, 40% said they were evaluating such solutions and 30% said they had no plans to do so. Apparently, despite some changes in the devices being used, hospitals still aren’t sure who should have mobile tools, how to support them and what infrastructure they need to keep those devices lit up and useful.

Hospitals Puts Off Patient Billing For Several Months During EMR Rollout

Posted on January 6, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

Here’s something you don’t see every day. A New Hampshire hospital apparently delayed mailing out roughly 10,000 patient bills going back as far as 11 months ago while it rolled out its new EMR.

According to a report in the Foster’s Daily Democrat,  members of Frisbie Memorial Hospital’s medical staff recently went public with concerns about the hospital’s financial state. Then a flood of delayed patient bills followed, some requesting thousands of dollars, the paper reported.

Hospital officials, for their part, said the delay was planned. Hospital president John Marzinzik said Frisbie needed time to implement its new Meditech EMR and didn’t want to send out incorrect bills during the rollout.

In fact, Marzinzik told Foster’s, under the previous system, records generated during doctor visits weren’t compatible with forms for hospital billing.

Rather than relying further on this patchwork of incompatible systems, Marzinzik and his staff decided to wait until the process was “absolutely clean” for patients. The hospital decided to have a staff member validate every balance shown on a statement before sending them out, he says.

Previously, in December of last year, anonymous Frisbie medical staff members sent Foster’s a letter to share concerns about the hospital and its administrators. The criticisms included skepticism about the over-budget implementation of the $13.5 million Meditech system, which they named as one of the reasons they lack confidence in the hospital administration. The staff members said that this cost overrun, as well as other problems, have undermined the hospital’s financial position.

As is always the case in such situations, hospital leaders took the stage to deny these allegations. Frisbie Senior VP Joe Shields told the paper that the hospital is in sound financial condition, and also said that the only reason why the Meditech project went over budget by $1.5 million was that the administrators delayed the implementation by seven weeks to give the staff holiday time off.

Hmmm. I don’t know about you, but to me, some parts of this story look a little bit bogus. For example:

* I appreciate accurate hospital bills as much as anybody, but the staff was going to check them manually anyway, why did it take 10 or 11 months for them to do so?

* The holidays take place at the same time every year.  Did administrators actually forget they were coming to an event that necessitated an almost 10% cost overrun?

Of course, only a small number of people know the answers to these questions, and I’m certainly not one of them. But the whole picture is a little bit odd.

The Anti Moonshot Conference – Focusing on Practical #HealthIT Innovation

Posted on January 5, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We all love to hear about and read about healthcare IT companies with massive visions that are making big bets on some moonshot idea. In fact, there’s a lot of value in thinking about and having moonshot ambitions that could disrupt healthcare as we know it. However, what’s unfortunate is that it seems like every healthcare IT conference out there is far too focused on these moonshot ideas that they miss talking about and collaborating on ways to innovatively deal with the real life challenges hospital IT professionals face every day.

This is the genesis behind why I finally pulled the trigger and launched a new healthcare IT conference called Health IT Expo. I’ve talked to far too many hospital IT professionals that go away from a health IT conference totally empty and in some cases upset that a conference could be so disconnected from the true healthcare IT challenges and realities they face in their hospitals and health systems.

As I’ve discussed this new conference with people, some get the wrong impression about what we’re trying to accomplish. Some suggest that we’re shunning healthcare innovation. I’d argue quite the opposite. At Healthcare IT Expo, our goal is to embrace the full spectrum of innovation and not just those innovations that might be considered “disruptive” or “breakthrough” innovations.

Let’s consider some of the areas that hospital and health system professionals would really like to see innovation and find answers:

  • How can I more effectively manage and secure my desktop and mobile device infrastructure?
  • What’s the right approach to virtualization in my organization? Is it really cost effective? What are the pitfalls I should be aware of?
  • How do I deal with all these legacy applications?
  • What’s the appropriate steps to take when a security breach occurs? (Yes, I already know a security breach is going to occur)
  • How can I ensure the data in my EHR is high quality data that’s useful in analytics applications?
  • What’s the best way to get data out of my EHR so I can use it for [insert project here]?
  • What actionable things can I do to “secure” my biggest security risk: people?
  • How can I streamline my 15 communication systems?
  • In what ways can I improve my EHR training and ensure my users are performing at optimum levels even with inevitable turnover?
  • What should I really be doing with my portal that’s effective for patients and providers?
  • How can I cost effectively handle my support desk so it can handle level 1, level 2, and level 3 support issues 24/7/365 without alienating the wide variety of users we need to support?
  • Do I need a data center? How should I approach my existing server infrastructure and new cloud options?
  • How can I improve patient identification and patient matching across all of my IT systems?
  • What can I do to improve patient registration?
  • Is single sign-on really possible and what can I do to better handle user provisioning?
  • Have I done a proper HIPAA risk assessment? What’s the right way to do remediation? Have I done remediation of any HIPAA risks found?
  • That’s great that you want to user virtual reality, but how am I going to secure it?
    How are we going to clean it? What’s the product lifecycle going to look like?
  • What’s the proper way to do penetration testing?
  • Where can I find real time analytics that are ready to be implemented today?
  • How can I better manage the hundreds of forms across my organization?
  • etc etc etc

I could go on and on and these are just touching the surface of the challenges. No doubt there are a hundred more challenges that don’t get covered at most healthcare IT Conferences because they have the wrong focus and the wrong people attending.

We all want to talk about AI, but what’s the point if I’m still trying to make sure the data is clean and that it’s stored in something other than a PDF or some inaccessible archaic system? Health IT Expo is focused on practical innovation.

If you’re a healthcare IT professional dealing with these real challenges and are looking for practical innovations that will help you and your organization, please join us at Health IT Expo. We want as many in the Healthcare Scene community to join us in New Orleans, so you can also get $300 off your registration (Only $395 to attend after the discount) for Health IT Expo by using the promo code hcscene on the normal registration page. We’re certain you’ll find no other conference out there that provides as much value for the price.

Plus, the Call for Speakers is still open if you have a practical innovation you can share. We even have options for 15 minute sessions if your innovation is useful and impactful, but doesn’t require a speaking degree to share.

Sorry for the sales pitch, but as you can tell I’m excited by Health IT Expo. I think we’ve created a unique conference that will help many hospital IT professionals find a more satisfying conference experience. As someone who’s attended hundreds of healthcare IT conferences, I’ve seen first hand the good, the bad, and the ugly of conferences. We’re taking all of those learnings and packing them into Health IT Expo.

What do you think of this approach? What do you think of Health IT Expo? What other problems do you have that you think we should cover? We’d love to hear from you in the comments or on our contact us page.

Merged Health Systems Face Major EHR Integration Issues

Posted on January 2, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

Pity the IT departments of Advocate Health Care and Aurora Health Care. When the two health systems complete their merger, IT leaders face a lengthy integration process cutting across systems from three different EHR vendors or a forklift upgrade of at least one.

It’s tough enough to integrate different instances of systems from the same vendor, which, despite the common origin are often configured in significantly different ways. In this case, the task is exponentially more difficult. According to Fierce Healthcare, when the two organizations come together, they’ll have to integrate Aurora’s Epic EHR with the Cerner and Allscripts systems used by Advocate.

As part of his research, the reporter asked an Aurora spokesperson whether health systems attempt to pull together three platforms into a single EHR. Of course, as we know, that is unlikely to ever happen. While full interoperability is obviously an elusive thing, getting some decent data flow between two affiliated organizations is probably far more realistic.

Instead, depending on what happens, the new CIO might or might not decide to migrate all three EHRs onto one from a single vendor. While this could turn out to be a hellish job, it certainly is the ideal situation if you can afford to get there. However, that doesn’t mean it’s always the best option. Especially as health system mergers and acquisitions get bigger and bigger.

To me, however, the big question around all of this is how much the two organizations would spend to bring the same platforms to everyone. As we know, acquiring and rolling out Epic for even one health system is fiendishly expensive, to the point where some have been forced to report losses or have had ratings on the bond reduced.

My guess is that the leaders of the two organizations are counting often-cited merger benefits such as organizational synergies, improved efficiency and staff attrition to meet the cost of health IT investments like these. If this academic studies prove this will work, please feel free to slap me with a dead fish, but as for now I doubt it will happen.

No, to me this offers an object lesson in how mergers in the health IT-centered world can be more costly, take longer to achieve, and possibly have a negative impact on patient care if things aren’t done right (which often seems to be the case).

Given the other pressures health systems face, I doubt these new expenses will hold them back from striking merger deals. Generally speaking, most health systems face little choice but to partner and merge as they can. But there’s no point minimizing how much complexity and expense EHRs bring to such agreements today.

Hospitals Excited By Telehealth, Consumers Not So Much

Posted on December 29, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare branding and communications expert with more than 25 years of industry experience. and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also worked extensively healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

When telehealth first emerged as a major commercial phenomenon, consumers were the main market targeted by providers, especially direct-to-consumer models like Teladoc and American Well. But if a new research report is right, the dynamics of the telehealth market have changed substantially, with hospitals and health systems investing heavily in telehealth and consumers hanging back.

The study, which was conducted by telehealth solutions provider Avizia, found that while hospitals and health systems are making increasingly large bets on telehealth, including infrastructure, training and process re-engineering, patients aren’t matching their enthusiasm.

Consumers who do access telehealth seem happy by what they find. When Avizia asked them to rate their telehealth experiences on a scale from 1 to 10, with 10 rating it as a “great experience,” nearly two-thirds ranked their experiences between 8 and 10. Also, consumers who were using telehealth said that they like the time savings and convenience it could offer (59%), cost savings due to a lack of travel expenses and lower wait times to see clinicians (55%).

That being said, many consumers haven’t gotten on board yet. In fact, roughly eight out of 10 consumers told Avizia that they weren’t well versed in accessing telehealth, nor did they know whether their insurer would pay for it.

Providers, for their part, have ambitious plans for telehealth use. According to the study, the top one was the ability to reach or expand access to patients (72% of respondents). However, they face several obstacles, the study notes, including problems with getting reimbursed by health plans (41%), program expenses (40%) and resistance from clinicians (22%).

The Avizia results suggest that hospitals are still wrestling with many of the problems they’ve faced over the past few years in implementing telemedicine.

For example, a study by KPMG released in mid-2016 noted that about 25% of the 120 providers it studied had implemented telehealth and telemedicine programs which have achieved financial stability and improved efficiency. Thirty-five percent of KPMG respondents said that they didn’t have a virtual care program in place, though 40% had said they had just implemented a program.

Another study, released earlier this year by Reach Health, notes that 50% of hospitals and health systems are beginning to shift department-based telehealth programs to enterprise-based programs, which suggests that they no longer see virtual care as an experimental technology. They still aren’t rolling out these larger programs yet.

Still, the fact that hospitals are continuing to push ahead with telemedicine, and even make meaningful investments, makes it clear that they’re not going to be put off by current telemedicine obstacles. When the reimbursement tide floods the gates, I’m betting that hospital telemedicine programs will go from “not unusual” to “omnipresent.”