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UPMC Plans $2B Investment To Build “Digitally-Based” Specialty Hospitals

Posted on November 20, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

The University of Pittsburgh Medical Center has announced plans to spend $2 billion to build three new specialty hospitals with a digital focus. Its plans include building the UPMC Heart and Transplant Hospital, UPMC Hillman Cancer Hospital and UPMC Vision and Rehabilitation Hospital. UPMC already runs the existing specialty hospitals, Magee-Womens Hospital, Western in Psychiatric Institute and Clinic and Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh.

UPMC is already one of the largest integrated health delivery networks in the United States. It’s $13 billion system includes more than 25 hospitals, a 3-million-member health plan and 3,600 physicians. If its new specialty centers actually represent a new breed of digital-first hospital, and help it further dominate its region, this could only add to its already-outsized clout.

So what is a “digitally-based” hospital, and what makes it different than, say, other hospitals well along the EMR adoption curve? After all, virtually every hospital today relies on a backbone of health IT applications, manages patient clinical data in an EMR and stores and stores and shares imagines in digital form.   Some are still struggling to integrate or replace legacy technologies, while others are adopting cutting-edge platforms, but going digital is mission-critical for everyone these days.

What’s interesting about UPMC’s plans, however, is that the new hospitals will be designed as digitally-based facilities from day one. UPMC is working with Microsoft to design these “digital hospitals of the future,” building on the two entities’ existing research collaboration with Microsoft and its Azure cloud platform.

The Azure relationship dates back to February of this year, when UPMC struck a deal with Microsoft to do some joint technology research. The agreement builds on both UPMC’s fairly impressive record of tech innovation and Microsoft’s healthcare AI capabilities, genomics and machine learning capabilities. For example, in working with Microsoft, UPMC gets access to Microsoft’s health chat bot technology, which is being deployed elsewhere to help patient self-triage before they interact with the doctor for a video visit.

I’d love to offer you specific information on how these new digitally-oriented will be designed, and more importantly how the functioning will differ from otherwise-wired hospitals that didn’t start out that way, but I don’t think the two partners are ready to spill the beans. Clearly, they’re going to tell you all of this is the new hotness, but nobody’s provided me with any examples of how this will truly improve on existing models of digital hospital technology. I just don’t think they’re that far along with the project yet.

Obviously, UPMC isn’t spending $2 billion lightly, so its leadership must believe the new digital model will offer a big payoff. I hope they know something we don’t about the ROI potential for this effort. It seems likely that if nothing else, that technology investment alone won’t drive that big a rate of return. Clearly, other major factors are in play here.

The B2B Vendors are Coming! The B2B Vendors are Coming!

Posted on March 10, 2017 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

It’s been a couple of weeks since the annual HIMSS conference wrapped up for 2017 and I’m just starting to emerge from the HIMSS-Haze of sleep deprivation. I doff my hat to those that recovered more quickly.

As usual there was too much to take in at HIMSS17. The keynotes were fantastic, the sessions educational and the exhibit hall had a buzz about it that was absent from last year’s event. Although the main take-away from HIMSS17 seems to be the emergence of Artificial Intelligence, I believe something else emerged from the event – something that may have far greater ramifications for HealthIT in the short term.

For me the big story at HIMSS17 was the arrival of mainstream IT companies. I have been going to HIMSS for 10 years now and I can honestly say this year was the first time that non-traditional healthcare IT vendors were a noticeable force. SAP, IBM (Watson), Intel, Google, Salesforce, Samsung and Microsoft were just a few of the B2B vendors who had large booths in the HIMSS17 exhibit hall.

Salesforce was particularly noteworthy. They made a big splash with their super-sized booth this year. It was easily five times the size of the one they had at HIMSS16 and featured a fun “cloud viewer” at its center along with a large theatre for demonstrations.

Salesforce, however, didn’t stop there. They also threw a HUGE party over at Pointe Orlando on Tuesday night. At one point, the party had a line of eager attendees that snaked out the front of the facility. Their party rivaled that of several large EHR vendors.

IBM was also back at HIMSS after an extended absence. Their “organic booth” was always busy with people curious to learn more about IBM Watson – particularly after the keynote given by CEO Ginni Rometty on Day 1.

So what does the arrival of mainstream B2B vendors mean for healthcare?

Consolidation. The EHR gold rush is over and yet companies like SAP and Salesforce are still electing to invest in healthcare. Why would they do that at a time when government incentive money has all but dried up? I believe it’s because they smell consolidation and optimization opportunities. These B2B players have large war chests and as HealthIT companies begin to struggle, they will be knights in shining armor waiting to swoop in.

More Consumer Technologies. One of the big trends in healthcare right now is consumerism. There is a drive by healthcare organizations to adopt consumer-centric technologies and workflows to service patients better. Patients are seeking providers that offer the conveniences that they are used to as consumers: online appointment booking, mobile chat, real-time price quotes, etc. Companies like Google, Samsung, IBM and Microsoft already have technologies that work well in the consumer world. With growing demand in healthcare it’s only natural that they are investing.

Standards. Maybe I’m just being optimistic, but when companies like TSYS (a very large financial transaction processor) show up at HIMSS for the first time, one can only hope that standards and interoperability will soon follow. After all, if cut-throat banks can agree on a common way to share information with each other, surely the same can happen in healthcare.

Cognitive Computing. Google, IBM, Microsoft and Intel have all made big bets on cognitive computing. I’m willing to bet that their investments in this area dwarf anything that a HealthIT company has made – including Epic and Cerner. IBM and Microsoft in particular have been aggressively seeking partners to work with them on health applications for Artificial Intelligence. Just ahead of HIMSS17, Microsoft and UPMC Enterprises announced that they would be working together to “create new products aimed at transforming care delivery”.

I’m very excited by the arrival of these B2B technology vendors. I think it signals the start of a maturation phase in the HealthIT industry, one in which consolidation and collaboration break down legacy silos. At the very least, traditional HealthIT companies like Cerner, Epic, athenahealth and NextGen will now have to step up their game in order to fend off these large, well-funded entrants.

Exciting times!

E-Patient Update: Hospitals Need Virtual Clinicians

Posted on July 20, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

Hospitals have a lot to lose if patients are readmitted not long after discharge. But in most cases, their follow-up care coordination efforts post-discharge are perfunctory at best.

My husband’s experience seems to be typical: a few weeks after his discharge, a nurse called and asked perhaps five or six very broad questions about his status. I doubt such as superficial intervention has ever done much prevent a patient from deteriorating. But this dynamic can be changed. As an active, involved e-patient, I think it’s time to bring artificial intelligence technology into the mix.

In recent times, AI platforms have emerged that may offer a big improvement on the, well, largely nothing hospitals do to prevent patients from deteriorating after they leave the facility. In fact, artificial intelligence technology has evolved to the point where it’s possible to provide a “virtual clinician” which serves as a resource for patients.

One example of this emerging technology comes from AI startup Sense.ly, which has developed a virtual nurse named Molly. According to the company, Molly is designed to offer customized patient monitoring and follow-up care, particularly for patients with chronic diseases. Its customers include the UK’s National Health Service, Kaiser Permanente, San Mateo Medical Center, University of California San Francisco, Microsoft and Allscripts.

Molly, an avatar-based system which was designed to mimic the bedside manner patients crave, can access data to assist with real-time care decisions. It also monitors vital signs – though I imagine this works better with a remote connected device — and tracks patient compliance with meds. Molly even creates custom questionnaires on the fly to assess patients, analyzes those responses for risk, and connects patients directly to real- life clinicians if need be.

While this is admittedly a groundbreaking approach, some independent research already exists to suggest that it works. Back in 2011, Northeastern University researchers found that patients who interacted with virtual nurse Elizabeth were more likely to know their diagnoses and make follow-up appointments with their doctor, ZDNet reports.

And if you’re afraid that using such a tool exposes your facility to big legal risks, well, that’s not necessarily the case, according to veteran healthcare attorney David Harlow.

“The issue is always in the terms of use, and if you frame that properly – and build the logic properly – you should be OK,” Harlow told me. He concedes that if hospitals can be sued for patient care problems generated by EMR failures — which happens now and then — a cause of action could arise from use of virtual clinician. But my sense from talking with him was that there’s nothing inherently more dangerous about deploying an AI nurse than using any other technology as part of care.

Speaking for myself, I can’t wait until hospitals and medical practices deploy a tool like Molly, particularly if the alternative is no support at all. Like those who tested Elizabeth at Northeastern University, I’d find it much easier to exchange information with an infinitely patient, focused and nonjudgmental software entity than a rushed nurse with dozens or hundreds of other patients on their mind.

I realize that I’m probably ahead of the market in my comfort with AI technology. (My mother would have a stroke if you asked her to interact with a virtual human.) But I’d argue that patients like me are in the vanguard, and you want to keep us happy. Besides, you might be pleasantly surprised by the clinical impact such interventions can have. Seems like a win-win.

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center Rolls Out Apple HealthKit

Posted on April 29, 2015 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

Racking up yet another win in a string of deals with prominent health systems and hospitals, Apple has won Cedars-Sinai Medical Center over to running its HealthKit platform. According to Bloomberg, the agreement which connects 80,000 patients to HealthKit is the largest integration project done with HealthKit to date.

Apple caught a lead in the patient health data game early on, snagging high-profile Ochsner Health System as its first customer in October of last year. And HealthKit has continued to see success. A Reuters story reported in February that 14 of 23 top U.S. hospitals contacted by the news organization had rolled out a pilot program testing the platform. In other words, while it has formidable competition, Apple seems to have already become the platform of choice for experimenting with patient generated data.

It has to have helped that HealthKit was already set to connect with a wide range of consumer health tracking apps. Within months of its summer 2014 launch, Apple could boast a family of more than 60 apps that connected to the platform, including Withings app HealthMate, Weight Watchers Mobile, a Panera Bread app allowing users to plan meals at the store, a  Mayo Clinic app, Epic’s MyChart portal app and more.

But Apple’s competitors in the consumer health space aren’t going to give up without a fight. With the wearables market reaching 21% of consumers, fellow behemoths like Samsung, Google and Microsoft will continue to challenge Apple for the patient-generated data crown.

Microsoft, for example, has launched a collection of wearables devices — including a fitness-tracking wristband, mobile health app and cloud-based health data platform called Microsoft Health. In Microsoft’s architecture, users store health and fitness data generated by wearables, which is, in turn collected by the Health app. And remember Microsoft’s HealthVault PHR?  It finds new life here, as another place for patients to store the data they personally generate.

Google also announced its a fitness and health tracking platform last summer, dubbed Google Fit. Google Fit is an open platform offering the platform SDK freely to developers. At launch, its partners included Nike+, Adidas, Motorola, Runkeeper and HTC.

Samsung, for its part, has positioned itself in more of a support role to the wearables revolution. Last May it introduced the Samsung Simband, a reference architecture for wearables. It also released open health data cloud platform SAMI (Samsung Architecture for Multimodal Interactions), which takes data from multiple sources and drills down on the data to analyze the health status of individual users.

But despite the massive firepower behind Apple’s competitors, Apple seems to have slipped ahead and taken the marketing high ground. Expect to see lots of hospitals announce that HealthKit is their patient-generated data platform of choice over the next few years. It seems like Apple is doing the right thing at the right time.

Is Apple HealthKit Headed For Hospital Dominance?

Posted on February 12, 2015 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

Even for a company with the cash and reach of Apple, crashing the healthcare party is quite an undertaking.  Not only does healthcare come with unique technical challenges, it’s quite the conservative business, in many cases clinging to old technologies and approaches longer than other data-driven industries.

Of late, however, Apple’s HealthKit has attracted the attention of some high-profile healthcare institutions, such as New Orleans-based Ochsner Medical Center and Stanford Healthcare. All told, a total of fourteen major U.S. hospitals are running trials of HealthKit. What’s more, more than 600 developers are integrating HealthKit tech into their own health and fitness apps.

What’s particularly interesting is that some of these healthcare organizations are integrating Apple’s new patient-facing, iOS HealthKit app with Epic EMRs and the HealthKit enterprise platform.  If this works out, it could vault Apple into a much more lucrative position in the industry, as bringing together health app, platform and EMR accomplishes one of the major steps in leveraging mobile health.

According to MobiHealthNews, the new app allows patients to check out test results, manage prescriptions, set appointments, hold video visits with Stanford doctors, review medical bills — and perhaps most significantly, upload their vital signs remotely and have the data added to their Epic chart. This is a big step forward for hospitals, but even more so for doctors, many of whom have warned that they have no time to manage a separate stream of mobile patient data as part of patient care.

For Apple leaders, the next step will be to roll out the upcoming Apple Watch and integrate it into its expanding Internet of Apple Healthcare Things. CEO Tim Cook is pitching the Apple Watch as a key component in promoting consumer health. While the iPhone gathers data, the smart watch will proactively remind consumers to move. “If I sit for too long, it will actually tap me on the wrist to remind me to get up and move, because a lot of doctors think sitting is the new cancer,” Cook told an audience at an investor conference recently.

All that being said, it’s not as though Apple is marching through healthcare corridor’s unopposed. For example, Samsung is very focused on becoming the mobile healthcare  technology provider of choice. For example, in November, Samsung announced relationships with 24 health IT partners, including Aetna, the Cleveland Clinic and Cigna.

At its second annual developer conference last December, Samsung introduced an array of software tools designed to support the buildout of a digital health ecosystem, including the Samsung Digital Health SDK and Gear S SDK, which lets app makers create software compatible with Samsung’s smart watches. Also, Samsung is already on the second generation of its Simband reference design for wearable device design, as well as the cloud-based Samsung Architecture for Multimodal Interactions, which collects sensor data.

And Microsoft, of course, is not going to sit and watch idly as a multibillion-dollar market goes to competitors. For example, late last year the tech giant launched a fitness tracking wristband and mobile health app. It’s also kicked off a HealthKit-like platform, imaginatively dubbed Microsoft Health, which among other things, allows fitness band users to store data and transfer it to the Microsoft Health app. Microsoft isn’t winning the PR war as of yet — Apple still has a gift for doing that — but have no doubt that it’s lurking in the swamps like an alligator, ready to close its powerful jaws on the next right opportunity to expand its healthcare presence.

Bottom line, Apple has captured some big-name pilot testers for its HealthKit platform and related products, but the game is just beginning. Having users in place is a good start, but Apple is miles away from being able to declare itself the leader in the emerging hospital mobile health market.

UPMC Kicks Off Mobility Program

Posted on July 1, 2014 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

If you’re going to look at how physicians use health IT in hospitals, it doesn’t hurt to go to doctors at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, a $10 billion collosus with a history of HIT innovation. UPMC spans 21 hospitals and employs more than 3,500 physicians, and it’s smack in the middle of a mobile rollout.

Recently, Intel Health & Life Sciences blogger Ben Wilson reached to three UPMC doctors responsible for substantial health IT work, including Dr. Rasu Shrestha, Vice President of Medical Information for all of UPMC, Dr. Oscar Marroquin, a cardiologist responsible for clinical analytics and new care model initiatives, and Dr. Shivdev Rao, an academic cardiologist.

We don’t have space to recap all of the stuff Wilson captured in his interview, but here’s a few ideas worth taking away from the doctors’ responses:

Healthcare organizations are “data rich and information poor”: UPMC, for its part, has 5.4 petabytes of data on hand, and that store of data is doubling every 18 months. According to Dr. Shrestha, hospitals must find ways to find patterns and condense data in a useful, intelligent, actionable manner, such as figuring out whether there are specific times you must alert clinicians, and determine whether there are specific sensors tracking to specific types of metrics that are important from a HIM perspective.

Mobility has had a positive impact on patient care:  These doctors are enthusiastic about the benefits of mobility.  Dr. Marroquin notes that not only do mobile devices put patient care information at his finger tips and allow for intelligent solutions, it also allows him to share information with patients, making it easier to explain why he’s doing a give test or treatment.

BYOD can work if sensitive information is protected:  UPMC has been supporting varied mobile devices that physicians bring into its facilities, but has struggled with security and access. Dr. Shrestha notes that he and his colleagues have been very careful to evaluate all of the devices and different operating systems, making sure data doesn’t reside on a mobile device without some form of security.

On the self-promotion front, Wilson asks the doctors about a pilot  project (an Intel and Microsoft effort dubbed Convergence) in which clinicians use Surface tablets powered by Windows 8. Given that this is an Intel blog, you won’t be surprised to read that Dr. Shrestha is quite happy with the Surface tablet, particularly the form factor which allows doctors to flip the screen over and actually show patients trends.

Regardless, it’s interesting to hear from doctors who are gradually changing how they practice due to mobile tech. Clearly, UPMC has solved neither its big data problems nor phone/tablet security issues completely, but it seems that its management is deeply engaged in addressing these issues.

Meanwhile, it will be interesting to see how far Convergence gets. Right now, Convergence just involves giving heart doctors at UPMC’s Presbyterian Hospital a couple dozen Microsoft Surface Pro 3 tablets, but HIT leaders plan to eventually roll out 2,000 of the tablets.

Business Intelligence And The Smart EMR

Posted on July 26, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

A new study by KLAS suggests that while providers are giving thought to business intelligence needs, they still haven’t honed in on favored vendors that they see as holding a leading position in healthcare. That may be, I’d suggest, because the industry is still waiting on EMRs that can offer the BI functionality they really need.

To look at the issue of BI in healthcare, KLAS interviewed execs at more than 70 hospitals and delivery systems with 200 or more beds.

When asked which BI vendors will stand out in the healthcare industry, 41 percent of respondents replied that they weren’t sure, according to a story in Health Data Management.

Of the other 59 percent who chose a vendor, IBM, SAP, Microsoft and Oracle came up as leaders in enterprise BI applications — but none of the above got more than 12 percent of the vote, HDM notes.

Vendors that did get a nod as standing out in healthcare-specific BI included Explorys, Health Catalyst, McKesson and Humedica (Optum). IBM and Microsoft were also singled out for healthcare use, but respondents noted that their products came with high price tags.

Meanwhile, QlikTech and Tableau Software were noted for their usability and data visualization tools though lacking in full BI toolsets, according to HDM.

While these stats are somewhat interesting on their own, they sidestep a very important issue:  when will EMRs evolve from transaction-based to intelligence-based systems?  After all, an intelligence-based EMR can do more to improve healthcare in context than freestanding BI systems.

As my colleague John Lynn notes, EMRs will ultimately need to leverage big data and support smart processes, becoming what he likes to call the “Smart EMR.”  These systems will integrate business intelligence natively rather than requiring a whole separate infrastructure to gather insights from the tsunami of patient data being generated today.

The reality, unfortunately, is that we’re a fairly long way away from having such Smart EMRs in place. Readers, how long to you think it will take before such a next-gen EMR hits the market?  And who do you think will be the first to market with such a system?

HIE and Other Interoperability Solutions for Healthcare

Posted on September 19, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I was participating in a LinkedIn discussion a few months back about HIE solutions. Jeremy Bikman from Katalus Advisors offered this great list of HIE and other interoperability solutions for healthcare:

Orion. Love these guys. Top notch products. Great service. Great UIs and culture too.
dbMotion. Another great firm. Top R&D in Israel. To-die-for partnership with UPMC
Axolotl (United). One of the first to really do HIEs. Good number of clients. Access to a lot of stuff by being owned by a mega-Payer.
Medicity (Aetna). See comments on Axolotl. Bought Novo Innovations which makes them super good at Amb-to-Acute connections. I know several of their execs and they are good honest guys.
Microsoft/GE/Whatever the JV will be called [This commentary is a few months old. I’m sure Jeremy knows it’s called Caradigm now]. They have a few very large and advanced HIEs (WHIE being the foremost of its kind). Remains to be seen what will become of it with so many top leaders leaving.
ICA. John Tempesco from ICA described their offering this way, “With our new approach to HIE deployment, we’ve been experiencing very good success in deploying our CareConnect clinical communication capabilities to enable clinicians in rural settings to attach clinical documentation and have true conversations in a secure environment at very low entry points and high adoption. See more at www.icainformatics.com to review our solution page.”

There are dozens of other vendors that claim to do it (and have one or two psuedo-HIEs here and there) including many of the inpatient and outpatient EMR vendors (Greenway just landed a big chunk of the state of Idaho) but I won’t mention those like Epic that have a great HIE offering (so long as the other orgs in the HIE also have Epic).

I think this is a good way to look at the various vendors and how their customer bases match their company culture as Jeremy pointed out. Are there other HIE solutions that should be on this list?

Group Develops EMR-Less HIE Technology

Posted on August 22, 2012 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

A pair of major tech players and a group led by Geisinger have come together to create tools making health information exchanges accessible to providers who don’t have an EMR in place. The tools are aimed at skilled nursing facilities, but from what I can see, the approach would work for other providers too.

Federal standards already require SNFs to submit MDSs — which are electronic patient assessments — to both the Medicare and Medicaid programs. The thing is, MDS data doesn’t conform to the Continuity of Care standard, so it can’t be shared amongst various providers across an HIE.

What’s happening is that Geisinger’s Keystone Beacon Community and GE-Microsoft joint venture Caradigm have created a MDS (minimum data set)-to-CCD transformer which turns patient care data into a Continuity of Care Document.  Providers can then take their CCD document and transfer it to  an HIE.

The Keystone Beacon Community, which is part of an HHS-backed program established in 2009, was launched to speed up the ability of health IT to transform local healthcare systems.  Keystone includes a network of 17 central Pennsylvania providers, including medical practices, hospitals, long-term care communities and others.

I’m not surprised to see Geisinger driving this train, as it’s been ahead of the EMR curve for many years. Geisinger is also large enough to conduct a real test of new technologies, as its network single-handedly serves more than 2.6 million residents of 42 area counties.

Still, I’ve got to wonder whether efforts like the Direct Project aren’t a better place to invest energy at the moment. It seems to me that Direct Project technologies are far simpler to deal with and still get a great deal done. But then again, maybe I’m just being a party pooper.  Nonetheless, I can’t help feeling that in this situation, less (complicated technology) is more.

Hospital IT System Support Phone Number Search

Posted on March 20, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today I was cruising my stats logs for Hospital EMR and EHR (as I always do since I’m a stats addict) and I came upon a search that was sent here that really struck me: “microsoft amalga phone number”. That’s right, someone was searching online to get the phone number for Amalga. I’m sure there are much odder searches out there, but why in the world would someone be searching online for the phone number of Amalga?

Think about it for a minute. If someone wants to buy Amalga, don’t you think they’d search for the Amalga website and there will be plenty of opportunities for you to enter your info to get a sales person to call you. In fact, I just did a search for Amalga, found their website and they have a big Contact Us button.

This leads me to believe that it’s possibly someone who wants a support number for Amalga. Are we really to the point that in order to get support for a hospital IT system, that we Google (or maybe they used Bing) for the phone number? You’d think there would be much better support for this than an online search to find a phone number for support.

Either way, I found it to be an odd search. Maybe it’s something completely different. At least I can hope that those hospital IT users have better support options than an online search.