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Why Don’t We Hear More from Epic, Cerner, or MEDITECH?

Posted on September 4, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit.

Epic is notorious for being “closed.” In fact, people talk about Epic being closed in so many ways, it’s hard to keep up. However, I think they are mostly seen as closed because of Judy’s decision to almost never talk to the media. In fact, it’s pretty rare that any one from Epic talks to the media. I remember when it was groundbreaking news when someone at Forbes did an interview with Judy.

Obviously, opening yourself to the media isn’t essential to making an enterprise sale. Judy and Epic have done quite well without opening themselves up to the media. In fact, their closed approach has in some cases gotten them more media coverage (see this blog post). Regardless of what you think of Epic, they are largely perceived as a black box that we don’t know nearly enough about. They have been more open with who they are and what they do in the past couple years than they ever were before, but that’s really not saying much.

While many love to talk about Epic’s closed nature, are any of the other hospital EHR vendors like Cerner or MEDITECH much more open? Last I checked, I have’t seen any of the CEOs of these companies blogging about their company and sharing their company’s culture and approach to the future publicly like we see in so many other tech companies. I haven’t seen many of the top leadership at any of these companies active on Twitter or other social media. Do any of these companies really show us any of their humanity? I can’t think of any that do.

The same isn’t true in the ambulatory world. We know all about athenahealth from Jonathan Bush who’s never afraid to bear his soul. SRSSoft and SOAPware have had really active CEOs who’ve openly shared their view of the EHR industry. Those are just a few of the examples. Why don’t we see the same from hospital EHR vendors?

I think the reason why is that it’s never been part of the culture of these companies. Changing that is a really hard thing to do. I don’t see it happening anytime soon. The closest we came to it was when the CEOs of many of these companies joined in the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge. Watching those videos made those companies a little more human. I think that’s a great thing for these companies.

While these companies have proven that you don’t need to engage their community in public to be successful, I’d suggest that the company that does start to do this will be at a distinct advantage. If the existing companies don’t decide to do it, then don’t be surprised if a new company disrupts the market with a more open and human approach. The incumbent EHR vendors won’t know what hit them and likely won’t be able to change the culture fast enough to fight them off.

Assuming you’re working on and doing amazing things for your customers, transparency can be an amazing marketing tool. If you’re not, then it’s better to hide in the shadows.

650 Posts, 500,000 Pageviews and Interesting Search Terms

Posted on August 15, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit.

It’s an exciting time for Hospital EMR and EHR. We just passed 650 blog posts since we started this hospital IT focused blog back on May 19, 2011. Hard to believe that this blog is already 3 years old. 215 posts a year is a pretty amazing body of work. Plus, we’re approaching nearly half a million pageviews in that time and have 1,198 email subscribers for just this blog (not including the general Healthcare Scene email subscribers). A big thank you to everyone who reads us regularly.

I thought it would also be fun to take a look at the funny, interesting and insightful things that people are searching on Google (and other search engines) that lead them to the site:

epic certification – With 1,625 searches (and thousands of more searches for variations of this term), there is a lot of interesting in becoming Epic certified. Unfortunately, I think that means there are a lot of really unsatisfied people when they find out that there’s no easy way to get Epic certified. I hope this changes.

epic emr – Obviously we’ve written a lot of content about Epic. Although, overall interest in Epic is always high. So, it’s not surprising that many of our readers are interested in reading about Epic.

soarian & soarian emr – At least for this site, Soarian takes the second spot on searches. I think that’s attributed to some great articles that we’ve written on Soarian over the years.

meditech emr – I’m a little surprised that we still don’t have Cener on the list, but Epic, Soarian, and MEDITECH are attracting more searches to this site than Cerner. I guess that means we need to write more content about Cerner.

meditech vs epic – Looks like many people have been searching to see if they should move from MEDITECH to Epic. At least I assume this is the direction they’re considering. Has anyone heard of someone going from Epic to MEDITECH?

epic certification salary – You can understand the interest in these numbers. Although, I’m surprised that Google didn’t send them to this post on Healthcare IT Today about Epic Salaries and Bonuses. Although, that’s for people working at Epic. Maybe I should do a post on Epic certified consultants salaries.

hospital ehr vendors – This search is not surprising since our Hospital EHR vendor page is one of our most popular pages.

ipad security issues – A great topic of discussion that every hospital is dealing with. Apple has come a long way on this issue, but they could still do better. Although, I’m not convinced they’ll ever fully embrace enterprise IT.

closed loop medication administration – We haven’t dug into this topic as much, but we should. I’ll add it to my list of future topics.

An interesting look at what people are searching on Google (albeit biased by the content of this site). Thanks everyone for reading. I look forward to our next 650 blog posts.

More of the Siemens Healthcare Back Story

Posted on July 10, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit.

One of the things I love about blogging is the comments that I receive. Many of them come in the comments of the blog, but just as many get emailed to me privately in response to my posts being emailed to readers. Every once in a while I want to share the emails I receive with the readers (Note: You can now subscribe to all of the Healthcare Scene emails in one place). This is one such response that I got in response to my post about Siemens Selling its Health IT business.

I remember the good ol’ days of being a 25+ year SMS Unity customer. Siemens who had recently purchased SMS told us that Unity would be going away. They showed us Soarian (which at the time was not actually built) and said that they would move us there for free. Of course, since it didn’t yet exist we would have to transition to Invision first for about a year. That would also be free. However, they would have to expense us for professional fees which they estimated to be in excess of $1,000,000. This is how we became a Meditech customer.

This kind of back story is what makes healthcare IT so interesting and so challenging. Many who want to enter the healthcare space forget about all this history and they usually fail. The very best hospital health IT companies that I know usually do an amazing job pairing new innovations and technologies together with someone who understands and has been part of this history. Pairing the two together is a powerful combination.

First Hand Perspective on Meditech EHR

Posted on May 19, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit.

The following was an interesting and insightful first person customer response to my post about Meditech EHR. These comments are from an IS Director and current user of Meditech.

As someone who’s worked with Meditech systems for a number of years I’d offer the following observations/opinions:

1. They don’t charge enough to make the charts that measure success in terms of revenue.

2. If success were measured in number of clients they would lead the pack with over 25% of the US EMR market and over 40% of the Canadian.

3. They are considered a ‘small’ hospital product by the general EMR community. Thus, ‘big’ hospitals tend to ignore them. Too bad. They scale nicely.

4. They don’t advertise heavily. Word of mouth seems to be their go-to model.

5. They have an ugly UI. However, they get the job done reasonably well.

Like most EMR vendors they have their share of problems of course. They need to be more responsive to their customers. They need to spend more time consider work-flow rather than expecting customers to bend their practices around the system. They need to retain talent longer. Hiring fresh graduates from BC and then losing them to the consulting world a couple of years later is really annoying for customers.

What are your thoughts on Meditech? I look forward to reading more perspectives in the comments.

Meditech – The Never Talked About EHR Power

Posted on May 15, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit.

I was cruising through Twitter today and saw the following tweet about Meditech EHR.

Don’t you love Twitter? Meditech can buy this kind of marketing. Hopefully for Meditech’s sake, Dr. Parker is right and that Meditech’s latest version is heading in the right direction.

The hospital EHR market is so interesting. Everyone looks at it as a two horse race with Epic and Cerner. Both of those EHR companies have done phenomenally well and so they should get a lot of coverage. However, people always seem to forget about Meditech. It’s odd to me because they still have a really large footprint in healthcare. You’d think they’d get more coverage, even if the coverage was pointing out the wrong steps they’re taking. Instead, I’ve seen very little coverage of them at all.

I took a quick look at Meditech jobs on the Healthcare IT Central job board. There are still a lot of them listed. That’s usually a good sign for a company.

Why doesn’t Meditech get any coverage lately? Are they a sleeping giant that could finally wake up? I’d love to hear your thoughts.

KLAS: Epic Losing Ground To Cerner

Posted on September 6, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

At this point in the EMR buying cycle, one would figure that the market for new hospital EMR purchases is pretty saturated, especially among larger hospitals with the capital to invest in big health IT projects. But according to a recent blog entry from KLAS, that’s not exactly the case.

In his blog item, KLAS researcher Colin Buckley notes that his firm has been watching clinical IT vendor wins and losses at 200+ bed hospitals for 10 years.  During that period — and especially post- Meaningful Use — KLAS has seen a growing number of new hospital EMR contracts.

By this point, after lots of EMR buying, and some switching out technology for second and third-choice EMRs, one might think that over-200-bed hospitals had settled on a platform that they could live with through Meaningful  Use Stage 3. Actually, not quite, Buckley says.

In fact, KLAS data shows that there are more hospitals running legacy EMRs, homegrown EMRs or no EMR at all than those who have bought a currently-marketed solution sometime in the past four years. And it’s likely these hospitals will be choosing a new EMR from the current vendor marketplace within the new few years, KLAS projects.

As sales increase in the 200+ bed hospital segment, market forces are shifting to favor new vendors. What’s particularly noteworthy about this is that the research firm has seen the ratio of Epic-to-Cerner wins shrink from 5-to-1 in 2010 to 2-to-1 in 2012.

According to KLAS, the hospitals that are likely to be out buying new EMRs look different than those which have already bought and implemented the EMR they’ll use for the next several years. “They are smaller and more cost conscious than the large hospital IDNs that have given Epic a lion’s share of wins year after year,” Buckley writes.

With Cerner and Epic busy eating each other’s lunch, Allscripts, MEDITECH, McKesson and Siemens are moving ahead as quickly as possible to roll out integrated ancillary and ambulatory solutions, Buckley notes. In other words, the competition for both ambulatory and hospital EMRs is far from played out.

Despite all of this activity, we are clearly in a late stage of the EMR market as a whole, or as my colleague John Lynn puts it, “the Golden Age of EHR adoption is over.” But if KLAS is right, there’s still some very healthy bucks to be made selling to laggard mid-sized hospitals. Let’s see if vendors used to serving hospital giants can adapt in time.

KLAS Reports Cerner and Epic Combined to Capture More Than 3/4 of New Large Hospital EMR Contracts

Posted on August 28, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit.

This tweet and associated messages are circling all around social media. Here’s the short description of the KLAS report:

HITECH has drastically changed the acute care EMR market. Previous industry mainstays like GE Healthcare and QuadraMed have effectively dropped out. McKesson has promoted their community hospital solution, Paragon, over their former flagship, Horizon. Allscripts, MEDITECH, and Siemens are all racing to recover from past stumbles and regain market share. Since meaningful use became a reality, Cerner and Epic have captured a large majority of new hospital contracts. However, there are still many decisions to be made in coming years and the remaining market is potentially more competitive than in years past.

For those of us following the industry, this isn’t really big news. Cerner and Epic have been battling for the big hospitals for quite a while. In fact, coming out of this year’s HIMSS I was more interested in the battle for small hospitals than large hospitals. Of course, we’ll see how hospital consolidation affects this as well.

What does seem clear and this report confirms is that Epic and Cerner all well positioned in the large hospital EMR market. I predict they’ll dominate until at least the end of meaningful use.

Best Of Breed Systems Lead In Battle For Meaningful Use Dollars

Posted on April 1, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

This week, Modern Healthcare published a very interesting analysis of ONC and CMS data on which vendors were used for Meaningful Use attestation.  The results suggest that the battle for market dominance may be closer than it looks when it comes to producing results that count. Perhaps more importantly, the data suggests that best-of-breed systems may have a stronger foothold than unified systems (see more below).

According to Modern Healthcare, four vendors stood out as leader in the complete inpatient EMR market:

* Epic Systems, with 370 hospitals customers, or 17.9 percent of 2,071 hospitals which have attested using one of the four

* Meditech, with 323 hospitals, or 15.6 percent

* CPSI, with 313 hospitals, or 15.1 percent

* Cerner Corp., with 208 hospitals, or 10  percent

All told, these top four players have sold 1,214 hospitals a complete inpatient EMR system. That’s represents 58.6 percent of all systems sold to hospitals that have gotten a Medicare incentive check using a complete inpatient EMR. The top 10 vendors swelling such systems, meanwhile, have sold them to 1,902 hospitals, owning almost 92 percent of this niche, Modern Healthcare notes.

It’s important to note, however, that best-of-breed implementations have won even more Meaningful Use dollars, the analysis suggests.  In fact, 2,438 hospitals using modular inpatient EMRs have achieved Meaningful Use. According to Modern Healthcare research, three developers lead the modular inpatient EMRs hospitals have used for this purpose:

* Meditech, with 637 hospitals, or 26.1 percent

* Cerner, with 530 hospitals, or 21.7 percent

* HCA Information & Technology Services, with 274 hospitals, or 11.2 percent

Collectively these vendors account for 59.1 percent of modular inpatient EMR market, the analysis shows.

I thought it was quite noteworthy that a larger share of hospitals are using best-of-breed inpatient systems to achieve Meaningful Use than complete inpatient systems. It would be interesting to find out if interoperability was one of the reasons hospitals are making this choice — since we know that the big vendors are shaky on the concept at best.

EMR Vendors Need To Get Their Act Together

Posted on March 22, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

For quite some time now, EMR vendors have gotten away with selling products that aren’t very usable and may even pose safety risks. But that’s the price enterprise EMR buyers have been willing to pay to jump in and automate. Very soon, though, vendors may be held to a higher standard, a new report from KLAS.

KLAS recently held a bake-off comparing Allscripts, Cerner, Epic, McKesson’s Paragon, Meditech 6 and Siemens’ Soarian EMRs head to head where it comes to usability and efficiency, SearchHealthIT reports. The study looked at how the products worked for individual users, and then looked at how they meet organizational quality of care demands.

Some of the EMRs  — and I wish SearchHealthIT had told us which ones — took a full month for physicians to learn. In some cases, physicians who were willing to take that month ended up with a richer experience than those which were easy and quick to learn, while in other cases, the darned thing still wasn’t usable.  Of course, those with long learning curves and unimpressive features suffered from low physician adoption, the  publication notes.

This is all interesting enough, but what grabbed me about the story was a provider quote from an end user, supplied by KLAS:

“As suggested by the new 2014 certification standards, vendors should take more responsibility for both the usability and safety of their products. These responsibilities shouldn’t be the sole purview of healthcare organizations and providers like they have been until now.”

Could it be that providers have finally gotten to the point where they’re no longer going to put up with unusable products and bring the hammer down even on giants like the big-shouldered group listed above?  After all, so far providers have swallowed hard and accepted a lot of ugly technology.

Maybe Meaningful Use demands are finally giving health organizations the backbone they need to stand up to Jabba the Hutt vendors?

Top Inpatient EHR Vendors – 2013 Black Book Rankings

Posted on February 22, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit.

I think that most of you know how I feel about the various EHR ranking systems. They all have their issues, but they are another interesting data point in the search for the right EHR. Plus, the EHR ranking trends over time can be interesting. Not to mention, it’s hard not to look at a post that has rankings. It’s almost un-American not to look.

So, I figured I’d post some of the Black Book Rankings over the next week. The following are the Top Ranked EHR Vendors for Inpatient Hospital Systems, Chains and IDN (in alphabetical order).

4MEDICA
ALLSCRIPTS
CPSI
EPIC
GE HEALTHCARE
HCS EMR
HEALTH MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS
HEALTHLAND
INFOMEDIKA
KEANE
MCKESSON
MEDITECH
NEXTGEN
PROGNOSIS HIT
QUADRAMED
SEQUEL
SIEMENS
UNI/CARE
VERSASUITE

Not too many surprises on the list. Was their any Hospital EHR vendor that you think should have made it on this list? I think this list would be more interesting if it just ranked the top 5 Hospital EHR vendors.