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KLAS: Epic Losing Ground To Cerner

At this point in the EMR buying cycle, one would figure that the market for new hospital EMR purchases is pretty saturated, especially among larger hospitals with the capital to invest in big health IT projects. But according to a recent blog entry from KLAS, that’s not exactly the case.

In his blog item, KLAS researcher Colin Buckley notes that his firm has been watching clinical IT vendor wins and losses at 200+ bed hospitals for 10 years.  During that period — and especially post- Meaningful Use — KLAS has seen a growing number of new hospital EMR contracts.

By this point, after lots of EMR buying, and some switching out technology for second and third-choice EMRs, one might think that over-200-bed hospitals had settled on a platform that they could live with through Meaningful  Use Stage 3. Actually, not quite, Buckley says.

In fact, KLAS data shows that there are more hospitals running legacy EMRs, homegrown EMRs or no EMR at all than those who have bought a currently-marketed solution sometime in the past four years. And it’s likely these hospitals will be choosing a new EMR from the current vendor marketplace within the new few years, KLAS projects.

As sales increase in the 200+ bed hospital segment, market forces are shifting to favor new vendors. What’s particularly noteworthy about this is that the research firm has seen the ratio of Epic-to-Cerner wins shrink from 5-to-1 in 2010 to 2-to-1 in 2012.

According to KLAS, the hospitals that are likely to be out buying new EMRs look different than those which have already bought and implemented the EMR they’ll use for the next several years. “They are smaller and more cost conscious than the large hospital IDNs that have given Epic a lion’s share of wins year after year,” Buckley writes.

With Cerner and Epic busy eating each other’s lunch, Allscripts, MEDITECH, McKesson and Siemens are moving ahead as quickly as possible to roll out integrated ancillary and ambulatory solutions, Buckley notes. In other words, the competition for both ambulatory and hospital EMRs is far from played out.

Despite all of this activity, we are clearly in a late stage of the EMR market as a whole, or as my colleague John Lynn puts it, “the Golden Age of EHR adoption is over.” But if KLAS is right, there’s still some very healthy bucks to be made selling to laggard mid-sized hospitals. Let’s see if vendors used to serving hospital giants can adapt in time.

September 6, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies.

KLAS Reports Cerner and Epic Combined to Capture More Than 3/4 of New Large Hospital EMR Contracts

This tweet and associated messages are circling all around social media. Here’s the short description of the KLAS report:

HITECH has drastically changed the acute care EMR market. Previous industry mainstays like GE Healthcare and QuadraMed have effectively dropped out. McKesson has promoted their community hospital solution, Paragon, over their former flagship, Horizon. Allscripts, MEDITECH, and Siemens are all racing to recover from past stumbles and regain market share. Since meaningful use became a reality, Cerner and Epic have captured a large majority of new hospital contracts. However, there are still many decisions to be made in coming years and the remaining market is potentially more competitive than in years past.

For those of us following the industry, this isn’t really big news. Cerner and Epic have been battling for the big hospitals for quite a while. In fact, coming out of this year’s HIMSS I was more interested in the battle for small hospitals than large hospitals. Of course, we’ll see how hospital consolidation affects this as well.

What does seem clear and this report confirms is that Epic and Cerner all well positioned in the large hospital EMR market. I predict they’ll dominate until at least the end of meaningful use.

August 28, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

Best Of Breed Systems Lead In Battle For Meaningful Use Dollars

This week, Modern Healthcare published a very interesting analysis of ONC and CMS data on which vendors were used for Meaningful Use attestation.  The results suggest that the battle for market dominance may be closer than it looks when it comes to producing results that count. Perhaps more importantly, the data suggests that best-of-breed systems may have a stronger foothold than unified systems (see more below).

According to Modern Healthcare, four vendors stood out as leader in the complete inpatient EMR market:

* Epic Systems, with 370 hospitals customers, or 17.9 percent of 2,071 hospitals which have attested using one of the four

* Meditech, with 323 hospitals, or 15.6 percent

* CPSI, with 313 hospitals, or 15.1 percent

* Cerner Corp., with 208 hospitals, or 10  percent

All told, these top four players have sold 1,214 hospitals a complete inpatient EMR system. That’s represents 58.6 percent of all systems sold to hospitals that have gotten a Medicare incentive check using a complete inpatient EMR. The top 10 vendors swelling such systems, meanwhile, have sold them to 1,902 hospitals, owning almost 92 percent of this niche, Modern Healthcare notes.

It’s important to note, however, that best-of-breed implementations have won even more Meaningful Use dollars, the analysis suggests.  In fact, 2,438 hospitals using modular inpatient EMRs have achieved Meaningful Use. According to Modern Healthcare research, three developers lead the modular inpatient EMRs hospitals have used for this purpose:

* Meditech, with 637 hospitals, or 26.1 percent

* Cerner, with 530 hospitals, or 21.7 percent

* HCA Information & Technology Services, with 274 hospitals, or 11.2 percent

Collectively these vendors account for 59.1 percent of modular inpatient EMR market, the analysis shows.

I thought it was quite noteworthy that a larger share of hospitals are using best-of-breed inpatient systems to achieve Meaningful Use than complete inpatient systems. It would be interesting to find out if interoperability was one of the reasons hospitals are making this choice — since we know that the big vendors are shaky on the concept at best.

April 1, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies.

EMR Vendors Need To Get Their Act Together

For quite some time now, EMR vendors have gotten away with selling products that aren’t very usable and may even pose safety risks. But that’s the price enterprise EMR buyers have been willing to pay to jump in and automate. Very soon, though, vendors may be held to a higher standard, a new report from KLAS.

KLAS recently held a bake-off comparing Allscripts, Cerner, Epic, McKesson’s Paragon, Meditech 6 and Siemens’ Soarian EMRs head to head where it comes to usability and efficiency, SearchHealthIT reports. The study looked at how the products worked for individual users, and then looked at how they meet organizational quality of care demands.

Some of the EMRs  – and I wish SearchHealthIT had told us which ones — took a full month for physicians to learn. In some cases, physicians who were willing to take that month ended up with a richer experience than those which were easy and quick to learn, while in other cases, the darned thing still wasn’t usable.  Of course, those with long learning curves and unimpressive features suffered from low physician adoption, the  publication notes.

This is all interesting enough, but what grabbed me about the story was a provider quote from an end user, supplied by KLAS:

“As suggested by the new 2014 certification standards, vendors should take more responsibility for both the usability and safety of their products. These responsibilities shouldn’t be the sole purview of healthcare organizations and providers like they have been until now.”

Could it be that providers have finally gotten to the point where they’re no longer going to put up with unusable products and bring the hammer down even on giants like the big-shouldered group listed above?  After all, so far providers have swallowed hard and accepted a lot of ugly technology.

Maybe Meaningful Use demands are finally giving health organizations the backbone they need to stand up to Jabba the Hutt vendors?

March 22, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies.

Top Inpatient EHR Vendors – 2013 Black Book Rankings

I think that most of you know how I feel about the various EHR ranking systems. They all have their issues, but they are another interesting data point in the search for the right EHR. Plus, the EHR ranking trends over time can be interesting. Not to mention, it’s hard not to look at a post that has rankings. It’s almost un-American not to look.

So, I figured I’d post some of the Black Book Rankings over the next week. The following are the Top Ranked EHR Vendors for Inpatient Hospital Systems, Chains and IDN (in alphabetical order).

4MEDICA
ALLSCRIPTS
CPSI
EPIC
GE HEALTHCARE
HCS EMR
HEALTH MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS
HEALTHLAND
INFOMEDIKA
KEANE
MCKESSON
MEDITECH
NEXTGEN
PROGNOSIS HIT
QUADRAMED
SEQUEL
SIEMENS
UNI/CARE
VERSASUITE

Not too many surprises on the list. Was their any Hospital EHR vendor that you think should have made it on this list? I think this list would be more interesting if it just ranked the top 5 Hospital EHR vendors.

February 22, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

What Would It Take To Get More Hospitals On VistA?

Recently, we shared the story of of a California community hospital that decided to bypass big vendors like Cerner and Epic and go for a VistA installation instead. While Oroville Hospital ended up spending $10 million on its VistA implementation, that turned out to be about half of what it would have spent on Cerner and its big-vendor cousins. Then, to boot, Oroville got a $5 million Meaningful Use payout.

Yes, without a doubt, Oroville had a different experience when it went with VistA than it would have if it hired on Epic and had armies of be-suited consultants descend onto its campus. Any open source project faces the risk that the fervor and volunteer labor that makes up the backbone of its ongoing development efforts.

But given how much flexibility hospitals get out of the deal, and how much they save, it seems to me that you’d still expect to see more VistA projects being mounted.  What would it take? Here’s a few ideas:

*  Get a CCHIT-certified VistA product out there:  Right now, hospitals don’t have such a choice. The only reason Oroville got its instance certified was thanks to special help from World VistA.

* Have more happy talk stories on how VistA can really work appear in serious business publications like Forbes:   Arguably, peer pressure is a major reason hospitals stick to a short list of popular solutions.  More coverage of VistA successes in major pubs creates its own buzz which may encourage IT leaders to reconsider their existing plans.

* VistA consulting firms need to become more common:  Right new there are a few firms, like Medsphere, that will walk hospitals through the VistA installation process. But what if, say, Accenture had a division devoted to VistA support?

There’s not a lot you can do if a hospital CEO is determined to buy Epic or Meditech or Cerner. But if they want to consider VistA, there’s a lot the industry could do to help.

January 22, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies.

Other EHR Options When Epic Denies You

I got the following email from the CIO of a hospital.

They’ve [Quadramed] got the whole ONC-ATCB certified EHR for Phase 1 MU (although the point in your post is valid about that certification being fairly general anymore). They are working on obtaining and integrating/interfacing ambulatory functionality for physician practices, but for hospitals they have some pretty good sized hospitals running their QCPR product. KLAS includes them in their evaluation of EHR vendors (along with the likes of Allscripts, Cerner, Epic, GE, McKesson, Meditech, and Siemens) although they clearly don’t have as many installed hospitals that most of that list has. They also need to develop some real patient portal type of functionality to stay certified for future MU Phases. Not a market leader, but they are a market player. In spirit of full disclosure, we are almost live with Quadramed product, and we will be using it as a full EHR for both inpatient and outpatient care settings. We could not afford the bigger vendor solutions, and Epic wouldn’t even talk with us because we are below their minimum size to qualify for their sales efforts….only vendor I’ve seen that has that luxury of flat out ignoring possible business. We didn’t like the inflexibility of the lower end EHR vendors, and Quadramed provided a lot of the flexibility of bigger vendors for the price of the smaller vendors.

I’d love to learn where other hospital CIOs turn when Epic won’t give them the time of day. Considering Epic’s hospital size requirements and who they will work with, this is more hospitals than not. I started a list of hospital EMR and EHR vendors that might help. Where do hospital CIOs go when Epic isn’t an option? Is there a Denied by Epic support group somewhere online where hospital CIOs can commiserate?

January 18, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

A Hospital Chooses VistA EMR Over The Giants

Here’s a story out of the pages of Forbes which should make open source advocates happy. In it, we hear the tale of a northern California hospital which decided to buck corporate trends and go with VistA rather than pay for a big-ticket EMR from a vendor giant.

Three years ago, at the outset of its EMR search, Oroville Hospital was going down the same path as most of peers. But the CEO wasn’t terribly happy with that path. While the 153-bed hospital had shortlisted giants like Cerner, McKesson and Meditech as possible candidates, chief executive Robert Wentz was worried about the sky-high cost, disruption and — as a smaller facility — lack of clout with vendors, Forbes reports.

Shunning conventional choices, Wentz decided to take a risk on VistA. Not only did he go with the less-conservative choice, he decided not to partner with companies like Medsphere that help hospitals integrate and develop VistA to meet their needs. Instead, he chose to work with independent VistA experts (a rogue crew with day jobs of their own) rather than be tied to a particular vendor.

To coordinate the project, Wentz worked with the non-profit WorldVistA and Vista Expertise Network, both of which embrace hundreds of programmers with VistA smarts. Wentz worked with programmers from the two groups, not only to build  out the hospital’s EMR but also to develop additional add-ons such as an e-prescribing package. WorldVistA CIO helped Oroville get its package certified for Meaningful Use, which brought in $5 million.

Now, three years into the project, Oroville has spent about $10 million on its EMR, about one-half of what it expected to spend on the giant EMR-makers’ software.

Now, it’s worth bearing in mind that Wentz and his IT team had to be more flexible than they would have if an army of consultants from Cerner or Epic had run the show. (I love the part in the Forbes story where a programmer told Wentz he had to end the call so he could make a trip to Costco. Classic.)  But Oroville seems to have reaped the benefits.  I wonder if this story will lead to more VistA adoption…

January 15, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies.

Top 10 Hospital EHR Vendors By Installed Systems

I came across this list of Top 10 Hospital EHR vendors by installed systems on Dark Daily (a great resource, particularly if you’re into Labs). The data is a little dated, but I thought it would be interesting to consider the numbers in 2011 and how they might look different today. Here’s the list:

Vendor Name Total Installations Percent of Installations
• Meditech 1212 25.50%
• Cerner 606 12.80%
• McKesson 573 12.10%
• Epic Systems 413 8.70%
• Siemens Healthcare 397 8.40%
• CPSI 392 8.30%
• Healthcare Management Systems 347 7.30%
• Self-developed 273 5.80%
• Healthland 223 4.70%
• Eclipsys (Bought by Allscripts) 185 3.90%

This list was taken from the HIMSS Analytics database. I wish I had access so I could compare these numbers for 2012. The interesting thing is that I’m not sure the Hospital EHR vendor numbers would be all that much different. Epic is the media darling, but its focus is squarely on the large hospital systems so they often lag behind when it comes to total installations.

December 21, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

Oops! Community Hospitals Unhappy With EMR Purchase

A new report from KLAS seems to confirm what we all know already — that buying an EMR is a tricky business that can easily end in failure.  The new KLAS report found that increasingly, community hospitals are questioning whether they bought the right EMR, and that a substantial number are already ripping out and replacing their system.

The authors of the report found that about 200 hospitals with less than 200 beds said they were planning to replace their EMR. And in an even more dramatic turn, KLAS found that one in three community hospitals who’d gone live with their EMR in the past 12 months felt they’d made the wrong decision.

Epic had the most overall community hospital wins for 2011, followed by Healthland, Cerner and CPSI. Looked at another, by market share, Meditech came in first with 20 percent, followed by Epic and Cerner, both with 12 percent.

This ferment comes against a backdrop of bigger institutional changes, in which smaller hospitals are joining integrated delivery networks, and as a result, are being shoehorned into using enterprise systems like Epic and Cerner already in place within the IDNs.

This level of disappointment in technical investments would be pretty remarkable in just about any industry. Given the pressure to get on the Meaningful Use train, it’s perhaps a bit less surprising, since pressure to invest can lead to fatal flaws in just about any decision-making process. Still, as an observer, it alarms me to see just how common EMR dissatisfaction is in smaller community hospitals.

As we’ve noted here before, giant institutions making giant investments seem a lot less prone to expressing dissatisfaction with their EMR.  Maybe it’s because those hospitals really are getting more for their money — who knows? But my guess is that they’ve as prone as smaller hospitals to wish they’d gone another way, given how hard it is to make an enterprise software buy that pleases everybody.

In any event, let’s hope that community hospitals largely make their peace with the EMR they’ve got. Rip and replace can’t be good for morale, finances or patient care.

December 18, 2012 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies.