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Marc Probst Takes Aim at Meaningful Use in Interview at CHIME

Posted on November 6, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit.

One of the must read interviews coming out of the CHIME Fall Forum is Mark Hagland’s interview with Marc Probst. We know that Marc Probst had a growing dissatisfaction with meaningful use after he said he would love to kill meaningful use during National Health IT Week. He keeps on that same trajectory during this great interview by Mark. Although, I think Marc is just representing the feelings of many hospital CIOs.

Here are a few excerpts of the interview for those who don’t want to read the whole thing:

So what is meaningful use for you, as an IT pioneer?

Well, it’s a pain in the neck! We believe we were already some of the most meaningful users, in the broader sense of the term, in healthcare IT, prior to the meaningful use program. But meaningful use has imposed rigid functions that you have to do, and I don’t think it’s added any additional value to what our clinicians do, but only to add tasks. So it hasn’t been all that helpful. I sit on the [federal] IT Policy Committee, so I have a little to do with meaningful use, but nonetheless, it hasn’t been [satisfying].

Nice to see that Marc Probst is taking a little bit of accountability for meaningful use. Although, if you’ve ever sat on a committee you know that you can only do so much if the committee is against you. I think the thoughts above are the opinions of many in healthcare. Although, this simple quote from Marc Probst sums up what many would like to see done:

“I honestly think we should now declare victory and move on.”

Although, Marc Probst also offers this sobering reality that many healthcare CIOs will face:

But I think that a fair number are going to say, look, if I haven’t done it this year, I’ll get the penalties anyway if I haven’t yet attested to Stage 2. I think many will focus instead on ICD-10 and data security, because meaningful use is so frustrating and they don’t control the variables; and security, they can control some of the variables. And the penalties are much harsher for breaches than for meaningful use failure.

I’ve never seen someone compare the meaningful use penalties with the penalties for breaches. It’s a very interesting comparison. However, they are hard to compare since the meaningful use penalties are guaranteed to happen if you don’t attest to MU. The breach penalties only happen if you have a breach occur…or I should say if you have a breach occur and you realize it happened (or get caught). That’s likely why more people are concerned with the meaningful use penalties than security and privacy in their organization.

I think this type of sentiment about meaningful use will grow stronger and be heard from more areas of the country. Marc Probst and Intermountain are really powerful figures in the healthcare community. No doubt, Marc’s decision to speak out on this subject will embolden many others to do the same.

Go and read the rest of Mark Hagland’s interview with Marc Probst. Many more good perspectives in the full interview. I’m glad that people like Marc agree with me that we should Blow Up Meaningful Use and focus on interoperability.

Is No Flex-IT the Best thing for EHR and Healthcare?

Posted on September 24, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit.

Strategically placed during National Health IT Week, 17 healthcare organizations sent a letter to HHS requesting that the meaningful use reporting period for 2015 be adjusted from 365 days to 90 days. Along with that, the Flex-IT act was introduced to congress in order to legislate this change. It’s always hard to predict what congress will do, but many believe that the Flex-IT act will get tagged on to something else and get passed. We’ll see if that indeed happens.

What everyone I talk to agrees is that the 365 day meaningful use stage 2 reporting period is going to be impossible for hospitals to meet. Sure, a few hospitals might make some herculean effort and meet it, but they’ll be so few and far between that they’ll be a rounding error.

What would it mean to healthcare and meaningful use if almost every hospital opts out of the meaningful use program? This isn’t too hard to imagine. A large portion of the meaningful use money has already been spent and the penalties don’t look that bad when you consider the costs and risks associated with the all or nothing meaningful use program.

If the MU reporting period doesn’t change, I think it spells the death of meaningful use. Sure, the program will subsist for those who have attested, but it will be a defunct program with so few participants that the program will have little impact. Plus, we’ll see a wave of efforts to make sure that those penalties for not being meaningful users of an EHR are removed much like has been done with the SGR fix year after year.

The Flex-IT act would at least keep meaningful use on life support. MU 2 is much harder, but with a change to a 90 day reporting period many will do it to avoid the penalties and get the last bit of EHR incentive money. If we want meaningful use to survive, then the Flex-IT act (or something that does something similar) is going to be essential to its future.

I’m just personally not sure that the Flex-IT act is such a great thing for EHR or the industry. Is it better to keep meaningful use on life support or bite the bullet now and have meaningful use die on the vine.

One might argue that meaningful use has accomplished it’s main goal: adoption of EHR software. It’s dramatically accelerated the adoption of EHR software. Would it be such a bad thing for meaningful use to disappear now? With MU gone, we could return to a more rationale EHR market. I guess this is where I’m torn on whether getting the Flex-IT act passed is a good or a bad idea.

What do you think? Is the Flex-IT act a good idea or should we just fall on the sword now as opposed to prolonging the regulation?

Meaningful Use Delay (Again): What We Need to Learn from Critical Access Hospitals Before it’s Too Late – Breakaway Thinking

Posted on September 18, 2014 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Todd Stansfield from The Breakaway Group (A Xerox Company). Check out all of the blog posts in the Breakaway Thinking series.
Todd Stansfield - Breakaway Group
Take a breather, implies the government’s latest rule for meeting meaningful use requirements of the EHR Incentive Program.  Perhaps that’s not the best plan of action.

On the brink of Labor Day weekend, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) finalized the rule for Stage 2 and Stage 3 Meaningful Use, a move designed to make it possible for more healthcare providers to attest this year and beyond. The rule pushes Stage 3 to 2017 and allows providers to meet Stage 2 requirements this year using 2011 certified electronic health record technology, among other things.

While the rule alleviates the challenges of attesting to meaningful use in 2014, it doesn’t solve the more significant problems of the 2015 reporting year, which begins Oct. 1, 2014. That date marks the beginning of the 365-day period over which providers will have to attest to Stage 2 requirements using 2014 certified technology—four times as long as the 90-day span the CMS just relaxed for the 2014 reporting year. Among critics of the ruling is the College of Health Information Management Executives, as the added burden of a full reporting year means “‘industry struggles will continue well beyond 2014,’” according to a Forbes article.

Recent news has sparked hope amid the panic for many healthcare providers. Two weeks after CMS finalized its ruling, Congresswoman Renee Ellmers (R-NC) and Congressman Jim Matheson (D-UT) introduced the Flexibility in Health IT (Flex-IT) Reporting Act, which aims to shorten the Stage 2 reporting window for 2015 from 365 to just 90 days—the same timeframe CMS granted in 2014 after providers struggled to attest. While the move would certainly ease the burden on providers, the Flex-IT Act still awaits Congressional approval before being passed into law.

So far this year, only 5.8 percent of eligible providers attested to Stage 2, according to a Health Affairs article. It’s a markedly low percentage, suggesting that if Congress turned down the Flex-IT Act few providers would be ready and able to attest in 2015.

Providers who are working toward attestation this year and planning for 2015 could learn from those who have been through the process such as Cottage Hospital and Odessa Hospital. Engaged leadership was key to these two critical access hospitals’ (CAHs’) ability to cement proper focus and commitment across their organizations to attest to Stage 2, according to EHRIntelligence and Healthcare Informatics. Both CAHs prove that attesting, however difficult, is certainly possible, and their unique strategies offer a clear path for the approximately 3000 providers eligible to attest.

At Cottage, “full support from the top for Meaningful Use” and “an all-hands-on-deck-effort” reportedly consisted of weekly meetings held by project managers and key personnel focused on discussing progress and barriers to success.

In addition to leadership support, both hospitals also reportedly transferred ownership of the initiative from the IT department to staff involved in care delivery. At Cottage, the IT team set up the infrastructure to support the EHR and then handed it over to clinical informaticists who understood the workflow of clinical staff. Clinical informaticists identified areas where the application could not support established workflows. Any discoveries were then reported to the vendor, who adapted the application to how care was being delivered, reversing the usual and inefficient route of providers adapting their processes to EHR functionality.  At Odessa, ownership transferred from a software vendor acting as Odessa’s IT department to their clinical team. While both Cottage and Odessa are fortunate to have vendors capable of meeting the 2014 certification criteria—a rarity among the 58.9 percent of eligible healthcare providers still yet to attest—both organizations are partly responsible for that success. They worked with their vendors to bring the EHR systems up to par with the requirements. This type of collaboration is crucial to establish certification-capable systems and will likely become a trend as more is asked of providers.

Both CAHs were also able to meet some of the most stringent requirements of Stage 2—which includes having 5 percent of patients view, download, and transmit their health information electronically. Cottage and Odessa found this particular requirement especially difficult, yet both were able to overcome it by educating patients, according to a Healthcare IT News article. Cottage reportedly “took down their [patients’] email addresses as they prepared for discharge and . . . [walked] them through the process of logging on and viewing their data.” This highlights that for a requirement solely within patients’ control, providers must take a more proactive approach to get their participation.

For providers to attest in 2015 no matter the reporting requirements, they will have to leverage strong leadership, clinical involvement, vendor collaboration, and strategies that focus on integrating patients in the overall care process. Cottage and Odessa prove these strategies are critical to meeting Stage 2 requirements. Their success has been validated by our research at The Breakaway Group, A Xerox Company, which shows that organizations with strong change leadership, effective education, ways to measure performance, and a means to sustain the effort are the best equipped to optimize their EHR use, and in the case of Stage 2, attest to the new requirements.

Stage 2 represents more than quantifiable criteria, but the start of using EHR systems in ways that can improve care and patient health. For our healthcare industry to ever realize buzz words like “interoperability” and “care continuum,” and for healthcare providers to breathe easier, this is a move we have to make.

Xerox is a sponsor of the Breakaway Thinking series of blog posts.

CMS Issues Final Rule on EHR Certification Flexibility, MU Stage 2 Extension, and MU Stage 3 Timeline

Posted on August 29, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit.

I can’t figure out what government process leads to final rules being regularly published at the end of the day on Friday. I know that Neil Versel from Meaningful Health IT News has hypothesized that they release it late on Friday when they want to bury the news. Maybe that’s the case, but the EHR certification flexibility doesn’t seem like something they’d want to bury. Regardless of the odd timing, CMS has just published the final rule that provides flexibility around EHR certification in the meaningful use program.

In their announcement, I’m not noticing any changes from what was in the proposed rule, but with some time we’ll know for sure if there’s any gotchas hidden in the final rule. No doubt many a meaningful use expert have just had their Labor Day weekend ruined by the announcement of this final rule.

Unfortunately, after the proposed rule was published most people loved the flexibility, but decided that it was too late for them to really benefit from the changes. I’ll be interested to see how many organizations will really benefit from these changes.

More importantly, the rule still includes the nebulous asterisk, “Only providers that could not fully implement 2014 Edition CEHRT for the EHR reporting period in 2014 due to delays in 2014 Edition CEHRT availability.” For EHR vendors that are already 2014 certified, this little asterisk feels like ONC is letting all the EHR vendors who didn’t perform well off the hook. It’s basically rewarding EHR vendors who can’t or have chosen not to keep up. Maybe that’s why the rule was published late on a Friday.

One could make the case that ONC was more worried about the doctors/hospitals whose EHR vendors failed to become 2014 certified, than the EHR vendors themselves. However, that part of the story is not likely to be told. Plus, it doesn’t take into account how a doctor/hospital whose EHR vendor is 2014 Certified will feel having to do the substantially harder MU stage 2 while their colleagues only have to do MU stage 1. (UPDATE: This EHR Certification Tool that CMS created seems to say that even if you’re on a 2014 Certified EHR and scheduled to do MU stage 2, that you can do Stage 1 or stage 2 objectives with 2014 CQMs. The chart linked at the bottom of this post says it as well. Seems like they’re being pretty open in their interpretation of “due to delays in 2014 Edition CEHRT availability”. Clear as mud?)

I’ve captured a chart showing the EHR Certification flexibility that this final rule provides:
EHR Certification Flexibility - 2014 Certified EHR

Plus, here’s the latest chart showing the meaningful use timelines:
Updated Meaningful Use Stage 3 Timeline

Other Resources and Responses:
CMS Official Press Release
CHIME’s Response
CMS’ EHR Certification Rule Tool
CMS HITECH 2014 CEHRT Flexibility Chart

We’ll keep adding other responses and commentary on the final rule as we find them.

Time for Government to Step Out of the Way of EHR and Let the Market Takeover?

Posted on May 22, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit.

The always interesting and insightful John Moore from Chilmark research has a post up that asks a very good question. The question is whether it’s time for the government to get out of the EHR regulation business and let the market forces back in so they can innovate. I love this section of the post which describes our current situation really well:

But as often happens with government initiatives, initial policy to foster adoption of a given technology can have unintended consequences no matter how well meaning the original intent may be.

During my stint at MIT my research focus was diffusion of technology into regulated markets. At the time I was looking at the environmental market and what both the Clean Air Act and Clean Water Act did to foster technology adoption. What my research found was that the policies instituted by these Acts led to rapid adoption of technology to meet specific guidelines and subsequently contributed to a cleaner environment. However, these policies also led to a complete stalling of innovation as the policies were too prescriptive. Innovation did not return to these markets until policies had changed allowing market forces to dictate compliance. In the case of the Clean Air Act, it was the creation of a market for trading of COx, SOx and NOx emissions.

We are beginning to see something similar play-out in the HIT market. Stage one got the adoption ball rolling for EHRs. Again, this is a great victory for federal policy and public health. But we are now at a point where federal policy needs to take a back seat to market forces. The market itself will separate the winners from the losers.

His points highlight another reason why I think that ONC should blow up meaningful use. In my plan, I basically see it as the government getting out of the EHR business. I do disagree with John Moore’s comments that the government should step away from interoperability. If they do, we just won’t have interoperability. I guess he’d make the argument that value based reimbursement will force it, but not in the same way that the rest of the EHR incentive money could force the issue.

I have learned that to really get out of this game or even do what I describe will take an act of congress. HHS can’t do this without their help. Although, they could get pretty close. Plus, maybe they could exert their influence to get congress to act, but I won’t be holding my breathe on that one.

The Shifting Patient and Provider Dynamic: Evolution of Patient Care – Breakaway Thinking

Posted on May 21, 2014 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Carrie Yasemin Paykoc, Senior Instructional Designer at The Breakaway Group (A Xerox Company). Check out all of the blog posts in the Breakaway Thinking series.
Carrie Yasemin Paykoc
The relationship dynamic between patient and provider is shifting.  Providers are no longer viewed as the sole investigator and lone decision maker. This societal shift is a result of changing social and regulatory pressures: increased self-empowerment, government regulations and incentives aimed at patient-centric care, access to care through the Affordable Care Act, and access to internet and application-based self-diagnostic tools. For many patients, being able to access their own information and results is now an expectation and in some cases a necessity to save lives. There are many applications, search engines, and patient portals that allow patients to quickly evaluate symptoms, learn about possible causes, and find appropriate medical facilities. For a patient with heart attack or stroke symptoms, these tools can reduce complications and potentially save his or her life.

With access to this type of medical information, providers are no longer seen as veiled mystical healers; they need to commiserate with their patients to achieve the best clinical outcomes. Physician leaders are also echoing this sentiment. CT Lin, MD CMIO at the University of Colorado Hospital & Health Sciences Center presented “The Man Behind the Curtain” at the 2013 Breakaway Group’s Healthcare Forum. This event brought together 100 influential healthcare executives for discussions and presentations around optimizing healthcare IT adoption. During CT Lin’s presentation he expressed the importance of sharing real-time results with patients. By sharing health data CT Lin found a direct correlation between improved patient engagement and clinical outcomes.

At the University of Colorado Hospital, CT Lin conducted his own research initiative to demystify the man behind the curtain with a program called, “We Make Mouse Calls.” The study was modeled after a similar research project at Yale University and evaluated patient communication and perception of overall care. Over the course of six months, 300 patients utilized an online messaging system for prescription refills, specialist referrals, and appointments. After six months, patients were surveyed about their experience. Patient satisfaction with providers dramatically improved amongst this group- 86 percent of patients expressed improvement in communication and care. Patients felt very satisfied and empowered with direct access to their providers. In contrast, a control group of patients who were not privy to the online messaging system expressed marginal satisfaction with their provider before and after the six-month period.

Years later, CT Lin took his research a step further by releasing real-time results to patients using the Hospital’s online platform. Patients were provided some guidance on what results would be available and the normal parameters for these results. The implications of this study were quite profound.  By sharing real-time results with their patients, they noted increased patient trust and empowerment, increased understanding of their condition(s), and an increased adherence to their treatment. With the curtain pulled back and the data revealed providers were able to directly improve clinical outcomes.

Healthcare providers must embrace the shifting dynamic of patient care. Access to clinical data is no longer a privilege of earning an esteemed medical degree. It is now a requirement of providing and receiving care in a patient-centric model. Providers and patients that do not adapt may continue to experience lower clinical outcomes than those that evolve. At the risk of becoming extinct, providers have no other option than to adapt this this model.

To view CT Lin’s presentation from the 2013 Healthcare Forum click the following link: http://vimeo.com/67149315.

Xerox is a sponsor of the Breakaway Thinking series of blog posts.

6 Hospitals’ Meaningful Use Payment Numbers

Posted on May 20, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit.

Becker’s Hospital CIO has posted some really interesting data about the meaningful use payments that hospitals have received. They very smartly looked at the first quarter financial reports for 6 hospitals that disclosed their EHR stimulus payments. Check out the data below:

  1. Community Health Systems (Franklin, Tenn.): $40 million, up from $19 million during the first quarter of 2013
  2. IASIS Healthcare (Franklin, Tenn.): $4 million, down from $5 million during the first quarter of 2013
  3. Tenet Healthcare (Dallas): $9 million, up from $5 million during the first quarter of 2013
  4. Hospital Corporation of America (Nashville, Tenn.): $30 million, down from $39 million during the first quarter of 2013.
  5. LifePoint Hospitals (Brentwood, Tenn.): $14 million, up from $6 million during the first quarter of 2013
  6. Universal Health Services (King of Prussia, Pa.): $430,000, down from $4.7 million during the first quarter of 2013

It’s interesting to see some of them have their payments really fall off. We’ll see how this data plays out over time, but I think it’s another data point that meaningful use stage 2 has issues and we should consider blowing up meaningful use.

4 Hospitals Have Achieved Meaningful Use Stage 2 – Yes…4

Posted on May 7, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit.

Yesterday a presentation was done to the HIT Policy Committee. The slide below certainly paints an interesting picture for meaningful use stage 2. There’s still time, but when you consider hospitals rush to get the EHR incentive money under stage 1 this number doesn’t bode well for MU stage 2.

HITPC_CMS_Update_2014-05-06

Eyes Wide Shut Meaningful Use Series

Posted on March 6, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit.

For those of you who read Hospital EMR and EHR but don’t read EMR and HIPAA (which from our latest survey is far too many of you), I wanted to highlight a series of blog posts by Mandi Bishop that I believe will be of extreme interest to those reading this site.

In this series called Eyes Wide Shut, Mandi gives some really amazing in the trenches views into how a large organization is dealing with the challenges of meaningful use and meaningful use stage 2 in particular.

Here’s a small sample from the latest entry in the series titled “Eyes Wide Shut: Meaningful Use Stage 2 Incentive Program Hardships“:

In my January update on Meaningful Use Stage 2 readiness, I painted a dismal picture of a large IDN’s journey towards attestation, and expressed concern for patient safety resulting from the rush to implement and adopt what equates to, at best, beta-release health IT. Given the resounding cries for help from the healthcare provider community, including this February 2014 letter to HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, I know my experience isn’t unique. So, when rumors ran rampant at HIMSS 2014 that CMS and the ONC would make a Meaningful Use announcement, I was hopeful that relief may be in sight.

Like AHA , I was disappointed in CMS Administrator Marilyn Tavenner’s announcement. The new Stage 2 hardship exemptions will now include an explicit criteria for “difficulty implementing 2014-certified EHR technology” – a claim which will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis, and may result in a delay of the penalty phase of the Stage 2 mandate. But it does nothing to extend the incentive phase of Stage 2 – without which, many healthcare providers would not have budgeted for participation in the program, at all, including the IDN profiled in this series. So how does this help providers like mine?

In that post, Mandi also tries to not just complain about the challenges they face, but also offer some solutions. You can see her full list of ideas in the post, but I especially like the simplicity of her last line “Consider applying the hardship exemption deadline extension to the incentive program participants.”

We need more in the trenches people like Mandi sharing their stories and solutions for others to see. Otherwise, the regulators sit in their office in DC and don’t know the details of why they should adjust. If you’re someone reading this that would like to tell your story as well, I’d be happy to give you the platform. Just drop me a note on our contact us page.

Large Health Systems May Miss Stage 2 Deadline

Posted on March 4, 2014 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

Usually, it’s the small institutions that are having fits when an IT program deadline is approaching. This time around, it’s the big boys that are struggling.

Intermountain Healthcare has announced that the organization will probably not attest to Stage 2 of the Meaningful Use program this year over concerns about patient safety, according to iHealthBeat

In an interview with HealthLeaders Media, CIO Marc Probst said that with the organization transitioning from its own EMR to EMR software from Cerner, all the software will not be running at all of the locations by the end of this year. This isn’t surprising after the relatively recent announcement that Intermountain would be switching to Cerner.

It’s not clear what it says about the success of the Meaningful Use Stage 2 program, other than that Intermountain has other priorities, but it does make you wonder what other large health systems will take a similar posture.

After all, ONC Chief Medical Officer Jacob Rieder (who also spoke with HealthLeaders) said that other large institutions are reporting similar situations. As amazing as it sounds considering the money involved, I won’t be surprised if we see more institutions following similar paths. There are a decent number of hospitals that haven’t even selected an EHR software.

According to Reider, it will be easier for small providers to meet Stage 2 requirements, given that they generally don’t have to plan as far into the future. But when it comes to large health systems, it seems that achieving this year’s Meaningful Use goal is a bridge too far.