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Health IT Predictions for #HIMSS17

Posted on January 25, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

My fellow HIMSS Social Media Ambassador, Dr. Geeta Nayyar, has a great post up with various HIMSS 2017 social media ambassadors making predictions at the hot topics we’ll hear about at HIMSS 2017 and throughout the year. I was happy to take part and offered the following prediction:

“Actionable data and patient empowerment are two hot topics at HIMSS this year. We’re going to see a whole slew of applications that take data from clinical decision support at the point of care or real-time analytics that assesses a patients’ risk, and make it actionable. Patient empowerment is going to be enhanced with applications for self-scheduling, patient communication through text and telemedicine and possibly even the first healthcare chatbots.”

I also was quite interested in Rasu Shrestha‘s prediction:

“This is the year we see the emergence of the ‘learning health system.’ With the advent of machine learning and AI, and with the perfect storm of healthcare related needs and opportunities, we will see a true emergence of intelligent systems that will learn and get better over time.”

The idea of a learning health system is a lot to chew on. That’s a big concept that won’t happen over night. However, there’s so much potential in the concept. I’ll be interested to see what technologies are showcased at HIMSS which will help us get closer to a learning health system. What technologies have you seen are helping us get there?

Geeta has posted a bunch of other predictions from HIMSS social media ambassadors, so take a second to head over to her TopLine MD blog and check them out.

“Learning Health System” Pilot Cuts Care Costs While Improving Quality

Posted on January 11, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

As some of you will know, the ONC’s Shared Nationwide Interoperability Roadmap’s goal is to create a “nationwide learning health system.”  In this system, individuals, providers and organizations will freely share health information, but more importantly, will share that information in “closed loops” which allow for continuous learning and care improvement.

When I read about this model – which is backed by the Institute of Medicine — I thought it sounded interesting, but didn’t think it terribly practical. Recently, though, I stumbled upon an experiment which attempts to bring this approach to life. And it’s more than just unusual — it seems to be successful.

What I’m talking about is a pilot study, done by a team from Nationwide Children’s Hospital and The Ohio State University, which involved implementing a “local” learning health system. During the pilot, team members used EHR data to create personalized treatments for patients based on data from others with similar conditions and risk factors.

To date, building a learning health system has been very difficult indeed, largely because integrating EHRs between multiple hospital systems is very difficult. For that reason, researchers with the two organizations decided to implement a “local” learning health system, according to a press statement from Nationwide Children’s.

To build the local learning health system, the team from Nationwide Children’s and Ohio State optimized the EHR to support their efforts. They also relied on a “robust” care coordination system which sat at the core of the EHR. The pilot subjects were a group of 131 children treated through the hospital’s cerebral palsy program.

Children treated in the 12-month program, named “Learn From Every Patient,” experienced a 43% reduction in total inpatient days, a 27% reduction in inpatient admissions, a 30% reduction in emergency department visits and a 29% reduction in urgent care visits.

The two institutions spent $225,000 to implement the pilot during the first year. However, the return on this investment was dramatic.  Researchers concluded that the program cut healthcare costs by $1.36 million. This represented a savings of about $6 for each dollar invested.

An added benefit from the program was that the clinicians working in the CP clinic found that this approach to care simplified documentation, which saved time and made it possible for them to see more patients during each session, the team found.

Not surprisingly, the research team thinks this approach has a lot of potential. “This method has the potential to be an effective complementary or alternative strategy to the top-down approach of learning health systems,” the release said. In other words, maybe bottom-up, incremental efforts are worth a try.

Given these results, it’d be nice to think that we’ll have full interoperability someday, and that we’ll be able to scale up the learning health system approach to the whole US. In the mean time, it’s good to see at least a single health system make some headway with it.