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Is Your Current Analytics Infrastructure Keeping You From Success in Healthcare Analytics?

Posted on February 17, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The following is a paid blog post sponsored by Intel.

Healthcare analytics is all the talk in healthcare right now.  It’s really no surprise since many have invested millions and even billions of dollars in digitizing their health data.  Now they want to extract value from that data.  No doubt, the promise of healthcare analytics is powerful.  I like to break this promise out into two categories: Patient Analysis and Patient Influence.

Patient Analysis

On the one side of healthcare analytics is analyzing your patient population to pull reports on patients who need extra attention.  In some cases, these patients are the most at risk portions of your population with easy to identify disease states.  In other cases, they’re the most expensive portion of your population.  Both of these are extremely powerful analytics as your healthcare organization works to improve patient care and lower costs.

An even higher level of patient analysis is using healthcare analytics to identify patients who don’t seem to be at risk, but whose health is in danger.  These predictive analytics are much more difficult to create because by their very nature they’re imperfect.  However, this is where the next generation of patient analysis is going very quickly.

Patient Influence

On the other side of healthcare analytics is using patient data to influence patients.  Patient influence analytics can tell you simple things like what type of communication modality is preferred by a patient.  This can be used on an individual level to understand whether you should send an email, text, or make a phone call or it can be used on the macro level to drive the type of technologies you buy and content you create.

Higher level patient influence analytics take it one step further as they analyze a patient’s unique preferences and what influences the patient’s healthcare decision making.  This often includes pulling in outside consumer data that helps you understand and build a relationship with the patient.  This analytic might tell you that the patient is a huge sports fan and which is their favorite team.  It might also tell you that this person has a type A personality.  Together these analytics can inform you on the most appropriate ways and methods to interact and influence the patient.

What’s Holding Healthcare Analytics Back?

Both of these healthcare analytics approaches have tremendous promise, but many of them are being held back by a healthcare organization’s current analytics infrastructure.

The first problem many organizations have is where they are storing their data.  I’d describe their data as being stored in virtual prisons.  We need to unlock this data and free it so that it can be used in healthcare analytics.  If you can’t get at the data within your own organization, how can we even start talking about all the health data being stored outside the four walls of your organization?  Plus, we need to invest in the right storage that can support the growth of this data.  If you don’t solve these data access and storage pieces, you’ll miss out on a lot of the benefits of healthcare analytics.

Second, do you trust your data?  Most hospital CIOs I talk to usually respond, “Mostly.”  If you can’t trust your data, you can’t trust your analytics.  A fundamental building block of successful analytics is building trust in your data.  This starts by implementing effective workflows that capture the data properly on the front end.

Next, do you have the processing power required to process all these analytics and data?  Healthcare analytics in many healthcare organizations reminds me of the old days when graphic designers and video producers would have to wait hours for graphics programs to load or videos to render.  Eventually we learned not to skimp on processing power for these tasks.  We need to learn this same lesson with healthcare analytics.  Certainly cloud makes this easier, but far too often we under fund the processing power needed for these projects.

Finally, all the processing power in the world won’t help if you don’t have your most important piece of analytics infrastructure: people.  No doubt, finding experienced people in healthcare data analytics is a challenge.  It is the hardest thing to do on this list since it is very competitive and very expensive.  The good news is that if you solve the other problems above, then you become an attractive place for these experts to work.

In your search for a healthcare analytics expert, you can likely find a data expert.  You can find a clinical expert.  You can find an EHR expert.  Finding someone who can work across all three is the Holy Grail and nearly impossible to find.  This is why in most organizations healthcare analytics is a team sport.  Make sure that as you build your infrastructure of healthcare analytics people, you make sure they are solid team players.

It’s time we start getting more value out of our EHR and health IT systems.  Analytics is one of those tools that will get us there.  Just be sure that your current infrastructure isn’t holding you back from achieving those goals.

If this topic interests you and you’ll be at HIMSS 2017, join us at the Intel Health Booth #2661 on Tuesday, 2/21 from 2:00-2:45 PM where we’ll be holding a special meetup to discuss Getting Ready for Precision Health.  This meetup will also be available virtually via Periscope on the @IntelHealth Twitter account.

When Healthcare IT Isn’t Enough

Posted on February 10, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This week I’ve gone through close to 200 pitches from companies who want to meet with me at the HIMSS Annual conference. While I can’t say that this is a fun task (especially since I have to tell 95% of them no), it is an educational experience to see what 200 companies are sharing as we head into the biggest healthcare IT conference in the world.

If I were to summarize the pitches in general, I would describe them as incremental. I’ll admit that this is a pretty disappointing perspective since we all know that healthcare needs something transformational. Don’t get me wrong. I believe that regular incremental improvement is transformational, but I’d say that most of the pitches lacked ambition.

Along with this observation is the idea that in most cases technology isn’t enough. If it were enough, EHR software that’s in use in most of healthcare would have already transformed the industry. The longer I spend in this industry, the more I realize that technology is just a tool in the tool belt. The real transformation comes from something more than technology. Technology might be a catalyst or facilitator, but that’s all.

This is actually a theme that really began at last year’s HIMSS conference. The areas that excite me most are those that literally change behavior. This might be the patient’s behavior or it might be the clinician’s behavior. It might also be the payer, health system, or government’s behavior.

The challenge is that changing behavior is hard. Slapping an EMR system is easy compared to behavior change. Implementing a secure text message solution is easy compared to behavior change. Rolling out an enterprise data warehouse is easy compared to behavior change.

At HIMSS and throughout the year I’m most interested on those companies who understand not only the technology side of things, but the behavior side of things as well.

If you’re interested in healthcare transformation and what it requires, join us at the Digital Transformation Meetup at HIMSS17. It’s happening Tuesday, 2/21 from 11:30-12:30 at the Dell EMC Booth #3161. More details on this meetup and other HIMSS17 meetups can be found here.

Suggestions and Tips for Hospital IT Professionals at #HIMSS17

Posted on February 8, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Hard to believe that the 2017 HIMSS Annual Conference is less than a week and a half away. For someone who eats, breathes, and sleeps Health IT, HIMSS is like winning the golden ticket to visit Willy Wonka’s chocolate factory. However, for a lot of hospital IT professionals, it might be their first time attending HIMSS and it can be quite overwhelming. 40,000-50,000 attendees and approximately 1300 exhibitors should be overwhelming.

While I’m certainly not a HIMSS veteran like many people, I’ve learned a number of important tips and tricks that will help you get the most out of HIMSS. Hopefully some of these will help you have a better HIMSS experience.

Standard Conference Answers – Instead of listing these individually, I’ll list them all in one since they’re true for any conference and their reasons should be now apparent. Wear comfortable shoes. Drink lots of water. Plan for good meals. Bring a battery pack or charge whenever possible. Expect bad internet. Have fun.

CHIME-HIMSS CIO Forum – As a hospital IT professional, the CHIME-HIMSS CIO Forum on Saturday and Sunday before HIMSS is excellent. They put together a great program of speakers, but more importantly you get the chance to network with 1000 or so of people like you. Don’t miss it if you come from the hospital IT world.

People – This one is obvious once you think about it, but is often missed by attendees. The people you hang out with at a conference will make all the difference. If you hang out with smart, well connected people, you’ll meet a bunch of other smart, well connected people and you’ll have a great experience. If you feel you don’t know anyone good to hang out with, hit social media and start interacting with people you find interesting. Friendships will develop quickly if you put in a little effort. Who you spend time with can transform your HIMSS experience for good or bad.

Plan for Serendipity – Everyone likes to suggest that the key to HIMSS is to have a plan. Considering the volume of sessions and exhibitors, a plan is good. However, don’t forget to plan in time for serendipitous interactions. Maybe that’s putting a party on your schedule that will broaden your horizon. Maybe that’s putting some down time on your schedule to sit at a table and connect with some random strangers. Maybe that’s some time trolling the exhibit hall to meet new people and companies that will provide you new perspectives. My favorite experience at HIMSS16 was a random dinner that came together after meeting someone at an impromptu meetup.

Don’t Be a Wallflower, Engage with Others – It’s easy to go to a conference and spend your entire time listening to sessions and exhibitor presentations and pitches. While this is valuable, you’ll have a deeper, more engaging experience at HIMSS17 if you engage with the people around you. Yes, I’m suggesting you go beyond just the usual casual platitudes of where you work and where you’re from. If this scares you or you don’t know how to get started, join us at a #HIMSS17 meetup where everyone is there to do just that. Education is valuable, but engagement is priceless.

Those are a few of my tips for #HIMSS17. What tips would you add to the list?

Health IT Predictions for #HIMSS17

Posted on January 25, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

My fellow HIMSS Social Media Ambassador, Dr. Geeta Nayyar, has a great post up with various HIMSS 2017 social media ambassadors making predictions at the hot topics we’ll hear about at HIMSS 2017 and throughout the year. I was happy to take part and offered the following prediction:

“Actionable data and patient empowerment are two hot topics at HIMSS this year. We’re going to see a whole slew of applications that take data from clinical decision support at the point of care or real-time analytics that assesses a patients’ risk, and make it actionable. Patient empowerment is going to be enhanced with applications for self-scheduling, patient communication through text and telemedicine and possibly even the first healthcare chatbots.”

I also was quite interested in Rasu Shrestha‘s prediction:

“This is the year we see the emergence of the ‘learning health system.’ With the advent of machine learning and AI, and with the perfect storm of healthcare related needs and opportunities, we will see a true emergence of intelligent systems that will learn and get better over time.”

The idea of a learning health system is a lot to chew on. That’s a big concept that won’t happen over night. However, there’s so much potential in the concept. I’ll be interested to see what technologies are showcased at HIMSS which will help us get closer to a learning health system. What technologies have you seen are helping us get there?

Geeta has posted a bunch of other predictions from HIMSS social media ambassadors, so take a second to head over to her TopLine MD blog and check them out.

Some Projections For 2017 Hospital IT Spending

Posted on January 4, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

A couple of months ago, HIMSS released some statistics from its survey on US hospitals’ plans for IT investment over the next 12 months. The results contain a couple of data points that I found particularly interesting:

  • While I had expected the most common type of planned spending to be focused on population health or related solutions, HIMSS found that pharmacy was the most active category. In fact, 51% of hospitals were planning to invest in one pharmacy technology, largely to improve tracking of medication dispensing in additional patient care environments. Researchers also found that 6% of hospitals were planning to add carousels or packagers in their pharmacies.
  • Eight percent hospitals said that they plan to invest in EMR components, which I hadn’t anticipated (though it makes sense in retrospect). HIMSS reported that 14% of hospitals at Stage 1-4 of its Electronic Medical Record Adoption Model are investing in pharmacy tech for closed loop med administration, and 17% in auto ID tech. Four percent of Stage 6 hospitals plan to support or expand information exchange capabilities. Meanwhile, 60% of Stage 7 hospitals are investing in hardware infrastructure “for the post-EMR world.”

Other data from the HIMSS report included news of new analytics and telecom plans:

  • Researchers say that recent mergers and acquisitions are triggering new investments around telephony. They found that 12% of hospitals with inpatient revenues between $25 million and $125 million – and 6% of hospitals with more than $500 million in inpatient revenues — are investing in VOIP and telemedicine. FWIW, I’m not sure how mergers and acquisitions would trigger telemedicine rollouts, as they’re already well underway at many hospitals — maybe these deals foster new thinking and innovation?
  • As readers know, hospitals are increasingly spending on analytics solutions to improve care and make use of big data. However (and this surprised me) only 8% of hospitals reported plans to buy at least one analytics technology. My guess is that this number is small because a) hospitals may not have collected their big data assets in easily-analyzed form yet and b) that they’re still hoping to make better use of their legacy analytics tools.

Looking at these stats as a whole, I get the sense that the hospitals surveyed are expecting to play catch-up and shore up their infrastructure next year, rather than sink big dollars into future-looking solutions.

Without a doubt, hospital leaders are likely to invest in game-changing technologies soon such as cutting-edge patient engagement and population health platforms to prepare for the shift to value-based health. It’s inevitable.

But in the meantime it probably makes sense for them to focus on internal cost drivers like pharmacy departments, whose average annual inpatient drug spending shot up by more than 23% between 2013 and 2015. Without stanching that kind of bleeding, hospitals are unlikely to get as much value as they’d like from big-idea investments in the future.

Hospitals Face Security Risks In Expanding Mobile Footprint

Posted on October 3, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

A new study suggests that hospitals are deeply concerned about their ability to protect patient data and their technology infrastructure from the growing threat of mobile cyberattacks.

The study, by Spyglass Consulting Group, found that 71% of hospitals consider mobile communications to be an increasingly important investment, in part due to the growth of value-based reimbursement and emerging patient- centered care models.

Thirty-eight percent of hospitals surveyed by Spyglass reported having invested in a smartphone-based platform to support these communications, with the deployments averaging 624 devices. Meanwhile, 52% have expanded their deployments beyond clinical messaging support other mobile hospital workers, researchers found.

That being said, 82% of hospitals weren’t sure they could protect these assets, particularly against mobile-focused attacks. Respondents worry that both smartphones and tablets could introduce vulnerabilities into the hospitals network infrastructure through malware, blastware and ransomware attacks. (These concerns are backed up by other Spyglass research, which concludes that 25% of data breaches originate from mobile devices.)

The surveyed hospitals said they were especially concerned about personally-owned mobile devices used by advanced practice nurses and physicians, noting that such devices may lack adequate password protection and may not have security software in place to block attacks.

Also, respondents said, APNs and doctors typically rely on unsecured SMS messaging for clinical communications, which may include protected patient health information. What’s more, respondents noted that these clinicians make heavy use of public Wi-Fi and cellular networks which can be compromised easily, exposing not only their device but also their data and communications to view.

But the hospitals’ fears aren’t limited to clinicians’ personal devices, Spyglass noted. Despite making increased investments in mobile security, hospital respondents said they were also concerned about hospital-owned and managed mobile devices, including those used by nurses, ancillary professionals and nonclinical mobile hospital workers.

“Cybercriminals have become more sophisticated and knowledgeable about the capabilities and vulnerabilities of existing security products, and the strategies and tools used by hospital IT detect potential intrusion,” said Gregg Malkary of Spyglass in a prepared statement.

Still, hospitals have a number of reasons to soldier on and solve these problems. For example, a HIMSS study released in March notes that hospitals feel mobile implementations positively impact their ability to communicate with patients and their ability to deliver a higher standard of care. Not only that, 69% of respondents whose hospitals use mobile-optimized patient portals said that this expanded their capability to send and receive data securely.

The HIMSS study found that 52% of survey respondents used three or more mobile and/or connected health technologies, with 58% mobile-optimized patient portals, 48% apps for patient education and engagement, 37% remote patient monitoring, 34% telehealth, 33% SMS texting, 32% patient-generated health data and 26% concierge telehealth.

In addition, 47% of HIMSS respondents said that their hospitals were looking to expand the number of connected health technologies they used, with another 5% of respondents expecting to become first-time users of at least one of these technologies.

Hospitals Can Learn From Low Outpatient EHR Turnover Rates

Posted on September 2, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

According to new data from HIMSS, almost 80% of freestanding outpatient facilities have an EHR in place, a figure which has shot up 30% over the past five years. This is no big surprise, given that the growth tracks neatly with the Meaningful Use program run. What seems to take HIMSS analysts aback, on the other hand, is that only a scant 15% of outpatient facilities surveyed seem ready to replace or purchase an EHR,

Why are learned minds at HIMSS taken aback by this data? Well, for one thing, hospitals have set their expectations. And over the last couple of years, hospitals have been dumping their existing EHRs at a rapid pace, with many large hospitals switching to newer systems with population health capabilities.

A recent Black Book study suggests that many hospitals weren’t thrilled with the results of even their lastest EHR investment, with some even considering yet another switch. In other words, 2,300 hospital executives and IT staff interviewed weren’t seeing much benefit from their ongoing, massive investment of time and money.

What’s more, HIMSS analysts don’t seem to have taken a close look at how EHR purchasing patterns vary between the inpatient and outpatient setting. And that’s worth doing. After all, if outpatient buyers and inpatient buyers are making strikingly different decisions about how to spend on IT, the reasons for this disparity probably matter.

Important lessons

I don’t have any statistical data to back this up, but I do have a fairly straightforward theory on why hospitals seemingly do worse at investing in EHRs than outpatient facilities. I believe that EHRs are collapsing under the weight of trying to manage entire enterprises.

My sense is that outpatient EHR buyers aren’t just clinging to their existing systems due to inertia or lack of capital (though these factors doubtless come into play). Rather, they’re in a better position to take advantage of the systems they acquire than hospital IT departments.

For most medical groups, their mission is more straightforward and their management structure flatter than that of hospitals, which are having to be all things to all people of late. And this allows them to leverage an EHR more effectively.

To me, this suggests the following takeaways:

  • Hospitals might benefit from an EHR that’s focused more on supporting individual departments/service lines (including outpatient services) than a master enterprise system
  • If EHRs supported individual departments in a modular fashion, and the modules could be switched out between vendors, hospitals could update only the modules they needed to update
  • Hospitals could learn something from how their independent practice partners choose and integrate EHRs

Industry activity clearly suggests that CIOs back a more modular approach to solving clinical problems, and this could help them build a more flexible infrastructure that doesn’t get outmoded as quickly. And if outpatient buying patterns offer additional insights into decentralizing EHRs, it’d be smart to leverage them.

HIMSS Social Media Ambassador Debate: FHIR and Patient Focus

Posted on June 8, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

While at HIMSS, I had a chance to do a “debate” with my good friend, partner and fellow HIMSS Social Media Ambassador, Shahid Shah. This was facilitated by Healthcare IT News, and the debate was moderated by Beth Jones Sanborn, Managing Editor of Healthcare Finance. Shahid and I had a good debate on the topics of healthcare interoperability and FHIR. Plus, we talked about the need for healthcare IT companies to focus on the patient and whether they deserve the bad rap they get or not. Enjoy the video debate below:
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Quick Hitting Thoughts on CDS (Clinical Decision Support)

Posted on March 21, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’m finally starting to go through all my notes from HIMSS. Part of that is because I’ve been busy after HIMSS. Part of it is because I like to recover from what I call the #HIMSSHaze. Part of it is that I like to see what still resonates a few weeks after HIMSS.

With that in mind, I was struck by a number of quick hitting comments that I noted from my interview with Dr. Peter Edelstein, CMO at Elsevier. Dr. Edelstein is a fascinating guy that I’ll have to have on a future Healthcare Scene interview. In the meantime, here are some of the quick hitting thoughts he shared about CDS (Clinical Decision Support).

One key point he made is that it seemed like many organizations didn’t have a strategy for CDS. He also aptly pointed out that the same seemed to apply to big data. I agree with him wholeheartedly. If we were to go to a healthcare organization and ask them their CDS strategy I don’t think most of them would have an answer. I think if we dug in, we’d probably find that most of them have essentially deferred their CDS strategy to their EHR vendor. Does anyone else feel like this is a problem?

When I asked Dr. Edelstein what would be his suggested strategy on adopting CDS, he suggested that he’d want to make sure that the CDS solution worked across all provider types. Next he compared the pull CDS solutions (Reference resources, etc) to wearing seat belts in a car and the push CDS solutions (Order sets, care plans, etc) to an airbag in a car. While we certainly need both sets of solutions, he suggested that we should make more of an effort to get the push CDS solutions implemented in healthcare.

I thought the analogy was a great way to look at the various types of CDS solutions. Plus, I agree that we need more push solutions in healthcare. The pull solutions are necessary for some of the most challenging problems, but we all know that when a doctor is busily going about their day they often choose not to check with the pull solutions when they should. The push solutions can be integrated into their workflow so that providers can more easily address any potential issues from within the flow of their day.

Dr. Eldestein also pointed out that Wikipedia is still the most commonly used reference resource despite many studies which have illustrated the medical errors that exist on it. Why do they use it? It’s because it’s simple to use and easily accessible. This is a great illustration of why we need the right CDS information to be more easily available to the doctor at the point of care at the moment they need it.

Definitely some great insights into CDS. What’s great about CDS is that at this point pretty much everyone is using some form of CDS. We’re also seeing CDS integrated more deeply into EHR software. I expect this trend will continue and will become much more sophisticated.

It does beg the question, what’s your healthcare organization’s CDS strategy?

GE Healthcare Is Still In The Game

Posted on March 14, 2016 I Written By

David is a global digital healthcare leader that is focusing on the next era of healthcare IT.  Most recently David served as the CIO at an academic medical center where he was responsible for all technology related to the three missions of education, research and patient care. David has worked for various healthcare providers ranging from academic medical centers, non-profit, and the for-profit sectors. Subscribe to David's latest CXO Scene posts here.

Below is the recent press release from GE Healthcare.  Their EMR will be used in the Rio 2016 Olympics which is a great win for GE.  The product has come a long way and they are making some great strides.  The challenge is where will the product fall in a healthcare EMR ecosystem that is predominately Epic and Cerner.   Personally I know of a few organizations that are evaluating a transition away from the GE Centricity platform due to either a merger with a bigger healthcare system that already has an enterprise EMR or they had a bad experience with Centricity and are moving on.  It will be interesting to see in the next 2-3 years how many EMR vendors we will have left.  I will definitely keep an eye on GE to see whether the recent win with the Olympic games will help create positive momentum in 2016.

LAS VEGAS–GE Healthcare announced today the International Olympic Committee (IOC) has selected the company’s Centricity Practice Solution as the official electronic medical record (EMR) to be used by the medical teams of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games. This marks the first time that all athletes and spectators at the Olympic Games will have their health interactions managed by an electronic medical record. The announcement was made at the 2016 Health Information Management Systems Society (HIMSS) conference in Las Vegas.

Centricity Practice Solution will be used for managing data related to injuries and illness for athletes competing in the games as well as spectators, officials, athlete family members and coaches who require medical assistance throughout the Rio 2016 Olympic Games. For the competitors, the data managed during the Games will be used to help drive optimal, individualized care to help athletes compete at a world-class level.

“The Olympic Games is about providing the best possible service to athletes,” said Dr. Richard Budgett, Medical and Scientific Director for the IOC. “The gold medal of medical services is something that is integrated and comprehensive: a total package. Adding access to an electronic medical record is key to our drive towards the prevention of injury. Without a proper medical, longitudinal record, it’s difficult for us to do surveillance and see what injuries are most common in certain sports. This would impact our ability to prevent and measure our effectiveness. The EMR is going to be a cornerstone for our medical services going forward.”

Centricity Practice Solution will be available in English and Portuguese and will provide access to next generation workflows, analytics and data to potentially help optimize athlete performance. The information will be analyzed to spot patterns and provide insights for future Games planning. Additionally, medical teams will be able to access diagnostic images and reports from within the EMR to assist in providing world-class care quickly and efficiently. GE’s EMR will be accessible at any of the multiple medical posts throughout the Games and at the central Polyclinic in the Olympic Village where more complex care is delivered.

“By selecting Centricity Practice Solutions EMR, the IOC is extending the clinical care and data management capabilities pioneered by the United States Olympic Committee (USOC), which has used GE’s EMR platform for the past two Olympic Games in London and Sochi,” said Jon Zimmerman, General Manager, GE Centricity Business Solutions. “Incorporating an EMR platform into the healthcare services will enable medical staff at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games access to real time data, analytics and health information to help their athletes perform at peak capabilities.”

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