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The B2B Vendors are Coming! The B2B Vendors are Coming!

Posted on March 10, 2017 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin is a true believer in #HealthIT, social media and empowered patients. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He currently leads the marketing efforts for @PatientPrompt, a Stericycle product. Colin’s Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung

It’s been a couple of weeks since the annual HIMSS conference wrapped up for 2017 and I’m just starting to emerge from the HIMSS-Haze of sleep deprivation. I doff my hat to those that recovered more quickly.

As usual there was too much to take in at HIMSS17. The keynotes were fantastic, the sessions educational and the exhibit hall had a buzz about it that was absent from last year’s event. Although the main take-away from HIMSS17 seems to be the emergence of Artificial Intelligence, I believe something else emerged from the event – something that may have far greater ramifications for HealthIT in the short term.

For me the big story at HIMSS17 was the arrival of mainstream IT companies. I have been going to HIMSS for 10 years now and I can honestly say this year was the first time that non-traditional healthcare IT vendors were a noticeable force. SAP, IBM (Watson), Intel, Google, Salesforce, Samsung and Microsoft were just a few of the B2B vendors who had large booths in the HIMSS17 exhibit hall.

Salesforce was particularly noteworthy. They made a big splash with their super-sized booth this year. It was easily five times the size of the one they had at HIMSS16 and featured a fun “cloud viewer” at its center along with a large theatre for demonstrations.

Salesforce, however, didn’t stop there. They also threw a HUGE party over at Pointe Orlando on Tuesday night. At one point, the party had a line of eager attendees that snaked out the front of the facility. Their party rivaled that of several large EHR vendors.

IBM was also back at HIMSS after an extended absence. Their “organic booth” was always busy with people curious to learn more about IBM Watson – particularly after the keynote given by CEO Ginni Rometty on Day 1.

So what does the arrival of mainstream B2B vendors mean for healthcare?

Consolidation. The EHR gold rush is over and yet companies like SAP and Salesforce are still electing to invest in healthcare. Why would they do that at a time when government incentive money has all but dried up? I believe it’s because they smell consolidation and optimization opportunities. These B2B players have large war chests and as HealthIT companies begin to struggle, they will be knights in shining armor waiting to swoop in.

More Consumer Technologies. One of the big trends in healthcare right now is consumerism. There is a drive by healthcare organizations to adopt consumer-centric technologies and workflows to service patients better. Patients are seeking providers that offer the conveniences that they are used to as consumers: online appointment booking, mobile chat, real-time price quotes, etc. Companies like Google, Samsung, IBM and Microsoft already have technologies that work well in the consumer world. With growing demand in healthcare it’s only natural that they are investing.

Standards. Maybe I’m just being optimistic, but when companies like TSYS (a very large financial transaction processor) show up at HIMSS for the first time, one can only hope that standards and interoperability will soon follow. After all, if cut-throat banks can agree on a common way to share information with each other, surely the same can happen in healthcare.

Cognitive Computing. Google, IBM, Microsoft and Intel have all made big bets on cognitive computing. I’m willing to bet that their investments in this area dwarf anything that a HealthIT company has made – including Epic and Cerner. IBM and Microsoft in particular have been aggressively seeking partners to work with them on health applications for Artificial Intelligence. Just ahead of HIMSS17, Microsoft and UPMC Enterprises announced that they would be working together to “create new products aimed at transforming care delivery”.

I’m very excited by the arrival of these B2B technology vendors. I think it signals the start of a maturation phase in the HealthIT industry, one in which consolidation and collaboration break down legacy silos. At the very least, traditional HealthIT companies like Cerner, Epic, athenahealth and NextGen will now have to step up their game in order to fend off these large, well-funded entrants.

Exciting times!

EMR Add-Ons On The Way

Posted on March 3, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

A new study backed by speech recognition software vendor Nuance Communications has concluded that many healthcare leaders are planning to add new technologies to supplement their EMRs, Popular add-ons cited by the study include (naturally) speech recognition, mobility options and computer-assisted physician documentation tools. While the results are partially a pitch for Nuance, of course, they also highlight the tension between spending on clinical improvement and satisfaction and boosting the bottom line with better documentation tech.

The study, which was conducted by HIMSS Analytics, was designed to look at ways to optimize EMRs and opportunities to improve care at hospitals and health systems. Conducted between August 17 and September 6 of last year, it draws on 167 respondents from 142 different healthcare organizations. Forty percent of respondents hold C-suite titles, and an additional 40% were in IT leadership. (It would be interesting to see how the two groups’ perceptions vary, but the study summary doesn’t provide that information.)

According to HIMSS, 83% of respondents reported having confidence that their organization would eventually realize their full potential, particularly improving care coordination and outcomes.

To this end, 75% of respondents said they’d boosted their EMR efforts with training and support resources, while two-thirds have increased staff in at least one IT area since implementing their system. Respondents apparently didn’t say how much they’d increased their budget, if at all, to meet these needs – and you have to wonder how these organizations are paying for these efforts, and how much. But the report didn’t provide such information.

To increase clinician satisfaction with EMR use, 82% of respondents said providing clinician training and education, 75% are enhancing existing technology and tools and 68% adopting new technology and tools. To read between the lines once again, it’s worth noting that hospitals and health systems seem to be putting a stronger emphasis on training than new tech, which somewhat contradicts the study’s conclusions. Still, EMR add-ons clearly matter.

Meanwhile, about one-quarter of survey respondents said that they planned to introduce EMR-enhancing tools at the point of care, primarily to improve documentation and boost physician satisfaction. Those included mobility tools (44%), computer-assisted physician documentation (38%) and speech recognition (25%). These numbers seem a bit lower than I would have expected, particularly the mobile stat. I’m betting that establishing mobile security is still a tough nut to crack for most.

While increasing clinician satisfaction and improving care outcomes is important, boosting financial performance clearly matters too, and respondents said that improving documentation was central to doing so. Fifty-four percent said that better documentation would reduce the number of denied claims they face, 52% expect to improve performance under bundled payments, 38% predicted reduced readmissions and 38% thought documentation improvements would better physician time management and improve patient flow.

Again, I doubt that C-suite execs and IT leaders will pay equal attention to tools which improve their finances and those which meet “softer” goals – and financial goals have to take priority. But these stats do suggest that hospitals and health systems are giving EMR add-ons some attention. It will be interesting to see if they’re willing to invest in EMR enhancements — rather than burrowing deeper into their existing EMR tech — over the next year or two.

Do Hospital CIOs Have the IT They Need?

Posted on February 27, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

While at a CIO reception at the HIMSS-CHIME Forum, I took part in an interesting conversation with a group of CIOs. They were talking about the number of phone calls they get from vendors. They had some unique insights and approaches into how they handled all the incoming messaging from vendors. I’ll save most of those insights for the Healthcare IT Marketing and PR conference that I host, but he also offered this interesting nugget when he said the following:

Our organization more or less has what we need to be successful. We aren’t looking to add more.

He did later acknowledge that if that wasn’t true, that they would go out and search for the vendors as opposed to an incoming call from a sales person.

This CIO’s comment struck me. I don’t think he was being so arrogant as to say that they weren’t going to purchase any more IT solutions. However, I think he was saying that he didn’t see any major enterprise purchases on his horizon.

On the one hand, I think that’s a sign of a maturing of the industry. His hospital organization finally had the IT tools they needed to be successful. That’s a good thing since I think if we’d had the conversation 3-5 years ago it would have been very different.

On the other hand, it’s kind of scary to think that this hospital CIO isn’t really looking at the IT environment around him and looking for new tools and solutions that could make his organization even better. This is a simple illustration of how every IT organization can get in a rut and stop innovating if we’re not careful.

At some point in any IT implementation, you have to step back and double down on the investments you’ve already made. There are huge opportunities in every healthcare organization I’ve seen to maximize the benefits they’re receiving from the IT they’ve already implemented. It’s fair to say that this CIO was at that stage of the game. It was time to stop searching and implementing other systems and time to optimize what’s already in place. That’s a good thing as long as it’s not taken too far.

I think the hospital health IT industry is largely in the same place as this CIO. Most aren’t looking to make new purchases. Instead, they want to extract value out of their previous purchases. What do you think? Have you seen this same sort of market maturity? Any idea on what will be next that will change this CIO and the industry’s thinking?

Is Your Current Analytics Infrastructure Keeping You From Success in Healthcare Analytics?

Posted on February 17, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The following is a paid blog post sponsored by Intel.

Healthcare analytics is all the talk in healthcare right now.  It’s really no surprise since many have invested millions and even billions of dollars in digitizing their health data.  Now they want to extract value from that data.  No doubt, the promise of healthcare analytics is powerful.  I like to break this promise out into two categories: Patient Analysis and Patient Influence.

Patient Analysis

On the one side of healthcare analytics is analyzing your patient population to pull reports on patients who need extra attention.  In some cases, these patients are the most at risk portions of your population with easy to identify disease states.  In other cases, they’re the most expensive portion of your population.  Both of these are extremely powerful analytics as your healthcare organization works to improve patient care and lower costs.

An even higher level of patient analysis is using healthcare analytics to identify patients who don’t seem to be at risk, but whose health is in danger.  These predictive analytics are much more difficult to create because by their very nature they’re imperfect.  However, this is where the next generation of patient analysis is going very quickly.

Patient Influence

On the other side of healthcare analytics is using patient data to influence patients.  Patient influence analytics can tell you simple things like what type of communication modality is preferred by a patient.  This can be used on an individual level to understand whether you should send an email, text, or make a phone call or it can be used on the macro level to drive the type of technologies you buy and content you create.

Higher level patient influence analytics take it one step further as they analyze a patient’s unique preferences and what influences the patient’s healthcare decision making.  This often includes pulling in outside consumer data that helps you understand and build a relationship with the patient.  This analytic might tell you that the patient is a huge sports fan and which is their favorite team.  It might also tell you that this person has a type A personality.  Together these analytics can inform you on the most appropriate ways and methods to interact and influence the patient.

What’s Holding Healthcare Analytics Back?

Both of these healthcare analytics approaches have tremendous promise, but many of them are being held back by a healthcare organization’s current analytics infrastructure.

The first problem many organizations have is where they are storing their data.  I’d describe their data as being stored in virtual prisons.  We need to unlock this data and free it so that it can be used in healthcare analytics.  If you can’t get at the data within your own organization, how can we even start talking about all the health data being stored outside the four walls of your organization?  Plus, we need to invest in the right storage that can support the growth of this data.  If you don’t solve these data access and storage pieces, you’ll miss out on a lot of the benefits of healthcare analytics.

Second, do you trust your data?  Most hospital CIOs I talk to usually respond, “Mostly.”  If you can’t trust your data, you can’t trust your analytics.  A fundamental building block of successful analytics is building trust in your data.  This starts by implementing effective workflows that capture the data properly on the front end.

Next, do you have the processing power required to process all these analytics and data?  Healthcare analytics in many healthcare organizations reminds me of the old days when graphic designers and video producers would have to wait hours for graphics programs to load or videos to render.  Eventually we learned not to skimp on processing power for these tasks.  We need to learn this same lesson with healthcare analytics.  Certainly cloud makes this easier, but far too often we under fund the processing power needed for these projects.

Finally, all the processing power in the world won’t help if you don’t have your most important piece of analytics infrastructure: people.  No doubt, finding experienced people in healthcare data analytics is a challenge.  It is the hardest thing to do on this list since it is very competitive and very expensive.  The good news is that if you solve the other problems above, then you become an attractive place for these experts to work.

In your search for a healthcare analytics expert, you can likely find a data expert.  You can find a clinical expert.  You can find an EHR expert.  Finding someone who can work across all three is the Holy Grail and nearly impossible to find.  This is why in most organizations healthcare analytics is a team sport.  Make sure that as you build your infrastructure of healthcare analytics people, you make sure they are solid team players.

It’s time we start getting more value out of our EHR and health IT systems.  Analytics is one of those tools that will get us there.  Just be sure that your current infrastructure isn’t holding you back from achieving those goals.

If this topic interests you and you’ll be at HIMSS 2017, join us at the Intel Health Booth #2661 on Tuesday, 2/21 from 2:00-2:45 PM where we’ll be holding a special meetup to discuss Getting Ready for Precision Health.  This meetup will also be available virtually via Periscope on the @IntelHealth Twitter account.

When Healthcare IT Isn’t Enough

Posted on February 10, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This week I’ve gone through close to 200 pitches from companies who want to meet with me at the HIMSS Annual conference. While I can’t say that this is a fun task (especially since I have to tell 95% of them no), it is an educational experience to see what 200 companies are sharing as we head into the biggest healthcare IT conference in the world.

If I were to summarize the pitches in general, I would describe them as incremental. I’ll admit that this is a pretty disappointing perspective since we all know that healthcare needs something transformational. Don’t get me wrong. I believe that regular incremental improvement is transformational, but I’d say that most of the pitches lacked ambition.

Along with this observation is the idea that in most cases technology isn’t enough. If it were enough, EHR software that’s in use in most of healthcare would have already transformed the industry. The longer I spend in this industry, the more I realize that technology is just a tool in the tool belt. The real transformation comes from something more than technology. Technology might be a catalyst or facilitator, but that’s all.

This is actually a theme that really began at last year’s HIMSS conference. The areas that excite me most are those that literally change behavior. This might be the patient’s behavior or it might be the clinician’s behavior. It might also be the payer, health system, or government’s behavior.

The challenge is that changing behavior is hard. Slapping an EMR system is easy compared to behavior change. Implementing a secure text message solution is easy compared to behavior change. Rolling out an enterprise data warehouse is easy compared to behavior change.

At HIMSS and throughout the year I’m most interested on those companies who understand not only the technology side of things, but the behavior side of things as well.

If you’re interested in healthcare transformation and what it requires, join us at the Digital Transformation Meetup at HIMSS17. It’s happening Tuesday, 2/21 from 11:30-12:30 at the Dell EMC Booth #3161. More details on this meetup and other HIMSS17 meetups can be found here.

Suggestions and Tips for Hospital IT Professionals at #HIMSS17

Posted on February 8, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Hard to believe that the 2017 HIMSS Annual Conference is less than a week and a half away. For someone who eats, breathes, and sleeps Health IT, HIMSS is like winning the golden ticket to visit Willy Wonka’s chocolate factory. However, for a lot of hospital IT professionals, it might be their first time attending HIMSS and it can be quite overwhelming. 40,000-50,000 attendees and approximately 1300 exhibitors should be overwhelming.

While I’m certainly not a HIMSS veteran like many people, I’ve learned a number of important tips and tricks that will help you get the most out of HIMSS. Hopefully some of these will help you have a better HIMSS experience.

Standard Conference Answers – Instead of listing these individually, I’ll list them all in one since they’re true for any conference and their reasons should be now apparent. Wear comfortable shoes. Drink lots of water. Plan for good meals. Bring a battery pack or charge whenever possible. Expect bad internet. Have fun.

CHIME-HIMSS CIO Forum – As a hospital IT professional, the CHIME-HIMSS CIO Forum on Saturday and Sunday before HIMSS is excellent. They put together a great program of speakers, but more importantly you get the chance to network with 1000 or so of people like you. Don’t miss it if you come from the hospital IT world.

People – This one is obvious once you think about it, but is often missed by attendees. The people you hang out with at a conference will make all the difference. If you hang out with smart, well connected people, you’ll meet a bunch of other smart, well connected people and you’ll have a great experience. If you feel you don’t know anyone good to hang out with, hit social media and start interacting with people you find interesting. Friendships will develop quickly if you put in a little effort. Who you spend time with can transform your HIMSS experience for good or bad.

Plan for Serendipity – Everyone likes to suggest that the key to HIMSS is to have a plan. Considering the volume of sessions and exhibitors, a plan is good. However, don’t forget to plan in time for serendipitous interactions. Maybe that’s putting a party on your schedule that will broaden your horizon. Maybe that’s putting some down time on your schedule to sit at a table and connect with some random strangers. Maybe that’s some time trolling the exhibit hall to meet new people and companies that will provide you new perspectives. My favorite experience at HIMSS16 was a random dinner that came together after meeting someone at an impromptu meetup.

Don’t Be a Wallflower, Engage with Others – It’s easy to go to a conference and spend your entire time listening to sessions and exhibitor presentations and pitches. While this is valuable, you’ll have a deeper, more engaging experience at HIMSS17 if you engage with the people around you. Yes, I’m suggesting you go beyond just the usual casual platitudes of where you work and where you’re from. If this scares you or you don’t know how to get started, join us at a #HIMSS17 meetup where everyone is there to do just that. Education is valuable, but engagement is priceless.

Those are a few of my tips for #HIMSS17. What tips would you add to the list?

Health IT Predictions for #HIMSS17

Posted on January 25, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

My fellow HIMSS Social Media Ambassador, Dr. Geeta Nayyar, has a great post up with various HIMSS 2017 social media ambassadors making predictions at the hot topics we’ll hear about at HIMSS 2017 and throughout the year. I was happy to take part and offered the following prediction:

“Actionable data and patient empowerment are two hot topics at HIMSS this year. We’re going to see a whole slew of applications that take data from clinical decision support at the point of care or real-time analytics that assesses a patients’ risk, and make it actionable. Patient empowerment is going to be enhanced with applications for self-scheduling, patient communication through text and telemedicine and possibly even the first healthcare chatbots.”

I also was quite interested in Rasu Shrestha‘s prediction:

“This is the year we see the emergence of the ‘learning health system.’ With the advent of machine learning and AI, and with the perfect storm of healthcare related needs and opportunities, we will see a true emergence of intelligent systems that will learn and get better over time.”

The idea of a learning health system is a lot to chew on. That’s a big concept that won’t happen over night. However, there’s so much potential in the concept. I’ll be interested to see what technologies are showcased at HIMSS which will help us get closer to a learning health system. What technologies have you seen are helping us get there?

Geeta has posted a bunch of other predictions from HIMSS social media ambassadors, so take a second to head over to her TopLine MD blog and check them out.

Some Projections For 2017 Hospital IT Spending

Posted on January 4, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

A couple of months ago, HIMSS released some statistics from its survey on US hospitals’ plans for IT investment over the next 12 months. The results contain a couple of data points that I found particularly interesting:

  • While I had expected the most common type of planned spending to be focused on population health or related solutions, HIMSS found that pharmacy was the most active category. In fact, 51% of hospitals were planning to invest in one pharmacy technology, largely to improve tracking of medication dispensing in additional patient care environments. Researchers also found that 6% of hospitals were planning to add carousels or packagers in their pharmacies.
  • Eight percent hospitals said that they plan to invest in EMR components, which I hadn’t anticipated (though it makes sense in retrospect). HIMSS reported that 14% of hospitals at Stage 1-4 of its Electronic Medical Record Adoption Model are investing in pharmacy tech for closed loop med administration, and 17% in auto ID tech. Four percent of Stage 6 hospitals plan to support or expand information exchange capabilities. Meanwhile, 60% of Stage 7 hospitals are investing in hardware infrastructure “for the post-EMR world.”

Other data from the HIMSS report included news of new analytics and telecom plans:

  • Researchers say that recent mergers and acquisitions are triggering new investments around telephony. They found that 12% of hospitals with inpatient revenues between $25 million and $125 million – and 6% of hospitals with more than $500 million in inpatient revenues — are investing in VOIP and telemedicine. FWIW, I’m not sure how mergers and acquisitions would trigger telemedicine rollouts, as they’re already well underway at many hospitals — maybe these deals foster new thinking and innovation?
  • As readers know, hospitals are increasingly spending on analytics solutions to improve care and make use of big data. However (and this surprised me) only 8% of hospitals reported plans to buy at least one analytics technology. My guess is that this number is small because a) hospitals may not have collected their big data assets in easily-analyzed form yet and b) that they’re still hoping to make better use of their legacy analytics tools.

Looking at these stats as a whole, I get the sense that the hospitals surveyed are expecting to play catch-up and shore up their infrastructure next year, rather than sink big dollars into future-looking solutions.

Without a doubt, hospital leaders are likely to invest in game-changing technologies soon such as cutting-edge patient engagement and population health platforms to prepare for the shift to value-based health. It’s inevitable.

But in the meantime it probably makes sense for them to focus on internal cost drivers like pharmacy departments, whose average annual inpatient drug spending shot up by more than 23% between 2013 and 2015. Without stanching that kind of bleeding, hospitals are unlikely to get as much value as they’d like from big-idea investments in the future.

Hospitals Face Security Risks In Expanding Mobile Footprint

Posted on October 3, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

A new study suggests that hospitals are deeply concerned about their ability to protect patient data and their technology infrastructure from the growing threat of mobile cyberattacks.

The study, by Spyglass Consulting Group, found that 71% of hospitals consider mobile communications to be an increasingly important investment, in part due to the growth of value-based reimbursement and emerging patient- centered care models.

Thirty-eight percent of hospitals surveyed by Spyglass reported having invested in a smartphone-based platform to support these communications, with the deployments averaging 624 devices. Meanwhile, 52% have expanded their deployments beyond clinical messaging support other mobile hospital workers, researchers found.

That being said, 82% of hospitals weren’t sure they could protect these assets, particularly against mobile-focused attacks. Respondents worry that both smartphones and tablets could introduce vulnerabilities into the hospitals network infrastructure through malware, blastware and ransomware attacks. (These concerns are backed up by other Spyglass research, which concludes that 25% of data breaches originate from mobile devices.)

The surveyed hospitals said they were especially concerned about personally-owned mobile devices used by advanced practice nurses and physicians, noting that such devices may lack adequate password protection and may not have security software in place to block attacks.

Also, respondents said, APNs and doctors typically rely on unsecured SMS messaging for clinical communications, which may include protected patient health information. What’s more, respondents noted that these clinicians make heavy use of public Wi-Fi and cellular networks which can be compromised easily, exposing not only their device but also their data and communications to view.

But the hospitals’ fears aren’t limited to clinicians’ personal devices, Spyglass noted. Despite making increased investments in mobile security, hospital respondents said they were also concerned about hospital-owned and managed mobile devices, including those used by nurses, ancillary professionals and nonclinical mobile hospital workers.

“Cybercriminals have become more sophisticated and knowledgeable about the capabilities and vulnerabilities of existing security products, and the strategies and tools used by hospital IT detect potential intrusion,” said Gregg Malkary of Spyglass in a prepared statement.

Still, hospitals have a number of reasons to soldier on and solve these problems. For example, a HIMSS study released in March notes that hospitals feel mobile implementations positively impact their ability to communicate with patients and their ability to deliver a higher standard of care. Not only that, 69% of respondents whose hospitals use mobile-optimized patient portals said that this expanded their capability to send and receive data securely.

The HIMSS study found that 52% of survey respondents used three or more mobile and/or connected health technologies, with 58% mobile-optimized patient portals, 48% apps for patient education and engagement, 37% remote patient monitoring, 34% telehealth, 33% SMS texting, 32% patient-generated health data and 26% concierge telehealth.

In addition, 47% of HIMSS respondents said that their hospitals were looking to expand the number of connected health technologies they used, with another 5% of respondents expecting to become first-time users of at least one of these technologies.

Hospitals Can Learn From Low Outpatient EHR Turnover Rates

Posted on September 2, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

According to new data from HIMSS, almost 80% of freestanding outpatient facilities have an EHR in place, a figure which has shot up 30% over the past five years. This is no big surprise, given that the growth tracks neatly with the Meaningful Use program run. What seems to take HIMSS analysts aback, on the other hand, is that only a scant 15% of outpatient facilities surveyed seem ready to replace or purchase an EHR,

Why are learned minds at HIMSS taken aback by this data? Well, for one thing, hospitals have set their expectations. And over the last couple of years, hospitals have been dumping their existing EHRs at a rapid pace, with many large hospitals switching to newer systems with population health capabilities.

A recent Black Book study suggests that many hospitals weren’t thrilled with the results of even their lastest EHR investment, with some even considering yet another switch. In other words, 2,300 hospital executives and IT staff interviewed weren’t seeing much benefit from their ongoing, massive investment of time and money.

What’s more, HIMSS analysts don’t seem to have taken a close look at how EHR purchasing patterns vary between the inpatient and outpatient setting. And that’s worth doing. After all, if outpatient buyers and inpatient buyers are making strikingly different decisions about how to spend on IT, the reasons for this disparity probably matter.

Important lessons

I don’t have any statistical data to back this up, but I do have a fairly straightforward theory on why hospitals seemingly do worse at investing in EHRs than outpatient facilities. I believe that EHRs are collapsing under the weight of trying to manage entire enterprises.

My sense is that outpatient EHR buyers aren’t just clinging to their existing systems due to inertia or lack of capital (though these factors doubtless come into play). Rather, they’re in a better position to take advantage of the systems they acquire than hospital IT departments.

For most medical groups, their mission is more straightforward and their management structure flatter than that of hospitals, which are having to be all things to all people of late. And this allows them to leverage an EHR more effectively.

To me, this suggests the following takeaways:

  • Hospitals might benefit from an EHR that’s focused more on supporting individual departments/service lines (including outpatient services) than a master enterprise system
  • If EHRs supported individual departments in a modular fashion, and the modules could be switched out between vendors, hospitals could update only the modules they needed to update
  • Hospitals could learn something from how their independent practice partners choose and integrate EHRs

Industry activity clearly suggests that CIOs back a more modular approach to solving clinical problems, and this could help them build a more flexible infrastructure that doesn’t get outmoded as quickly. And if outpatient buying patterns offer additional insights into decentralizing EHRs, it’d be smart to leverage them.