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Healthcare IT Leadership Infographic – A 25 Year History

Posted on September 17, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit.

Always a fan of an infographic, I thought many of my readers here would be interested in this Healthcare IT Leadership infographic that HIMSS and HIMSS analytics just put out for National Health IT Week. Pretty interesting data that HIMSS has been collecting in their annual leadership survey for the past 25 years.
Health IT Leadership Infographic - A 25 Year History

Five EMR Rollout Lessons Gleaned from EMR Adoption Stage 7 Hospitals

Posted on February 14, 2014 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

Since 2006, HIMSS Analytics has named only 160 hospitals as reaching stage 7 in its EMR adoption model, 30 of which reached paperless status into their 2013, HIMSS reports.  To help other hospitals in their journey, HIMSS has queried some of these hospitals, and come up five methods which help hospitals in their EMR adoption process. They include the following:

1. Use the Big Bang Method

Health IT leaders who have been through the EMR rollout process and reached Stage 7 told HIMSS that “Big Bang” implementation, rather than gradual phase-in, worked well for their institutions and provided better patient experiences.

2. Universal Training

Hospitals at the top of the EMR adoption food chain say that part of how they succeed was to train everyone — the entire care delivery team rather than specific types of providers. It’s also helpful to find a core group of champions within nursing, physicians and leadership to champion the process and support their peers.

3. Respect Your Organization’s Culture

When deploying software of such a cost and complexity, it’s easy to lose sight of what makes your organization unique. Make sure your change leadership process addresses the realities of local environments, and leverages unique strengths of your staff.

4. Involve Your Whole Team

These high-performing adopters stressed that it’s important to involve operational leaders from the outset and to make the EMR a corporate strategic initiative on by clinicians, not an information systems initiative.

5. Use All of Your Resources

No matter how you do it — via peer to peer best practices discussions with other hospitals, partnering with the vendor or other strategies — take advantage of the resources you have to improve, streamline and speed up the EMR installation process.

Of course, no two hospitals are exactly alike, and some of these ideas may not fit with your culture or organizational status. But given the success hospitals have had with these approaches, they’re certainly worth a look

Which Health IT Is Poised For Hospital Growth?

Posted on January 21, 2014 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

Wondering which hospital applications are likely to be popular in the near future?  According to HIMSS Analytics, contenders include patient portals, clinical data warehousing/mining, and radiology barcoding software are poised for faster uptake in hospitals.

To gather this information, HIMSS Analytics did an analysis of the current market penetration and projected five-year sales trajectory each application considered in its Electronic Medical Record Adoption Model (EMRAM) report.  Researchers found that first-time purchases of these advanced EMR applications should grow dramatically in hospitals across the U.S.

According to Healthcare Informatics, there are good reasons why each of these three technology should be on the upswing in hospitals.  For example, the patient portal market is growing because it’s tied to Meaningful Use Stage 2 requirements.  Expected growth in sales of clinical data warehousing/mining technology is tied to the need to leverage data held in EMRs, and it’s that that sales increases in and radiology barcoding are probably associated with patient safety initiatives.

Meanwhile, the report also noted that several basic applications which have already saturated the hospital market will be responsible for a high-volume IT replacement sales, including laboratory barcoding, pharmacy management systems and information systems for radiology and laboratorydepartments.

The report from HIMSS seemingly doesn’t take mobile applications and systems into account — I’d argue because they are not yet seen as enterprise-level tools — but I think hospitals will be spending more on mobile technology than anticipate over the next few years, as tablets and smartphones become a permanent part of their infrastructure.  Just how fast that will happen remains to be seen, but it will happen.

25% Of Hospitals Stalled On EMR Progress

Posted on October 22, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

As most readers know, HIMSS has developed a proprietary scale which it uses to track how far along hospitals are in their EMR adoption process.

As I discussed previously, the predictable has happened when it comes to progress. Hospitals with extensive resources, notably academic medical centers and large suburban chains, have climbed the eight-step ladder of the scale, known as the HIMSS Analytics EMR Adoption Model (EMRAM), while smaller and rural facilities have moved more slowly.

Now, there’s evidence suggesting that making progress on EMRAM is harder than it seemed previously. New research from HIMSS comparing quarterly EMRAM progression of 4,811 hospitals during the last five years (Q2 2008 and Q2 2013) has concluded that a surprising number of hospitals are basically stuck in place.

The new report has found that 73.7 percent of  U.S. hospitals have advanced by at least one stage over the past five years, and that half of those who advanced climbed the scale by two or three stages. Another 20 percent of those advancing moved up four or more stages during the five-year period studied.

Right now, the largest number of hospitals (at 34.5 percent at Q2 2013) fall into EMRAM stage 3, which includes nursing/clinical documentation, CDSS (error checking) and PACS available. Stage 4 through 6 account for 43.3 percent all together, the most populated level being stage 5, closed loop medication administration, with 18.7 percent.

That being said, 25 percent of hospitals had made no progress whatsoever over the last five years. What’s more, four percent of hospitals have remained at EMRAM stage 0 (completely paper-based). As I see it, these are fairly surprising results given the Meaningful Use pressures hospitals face.

Meanwhile, only 2.1 percent of hospitals had what HIMSS Analytics regards as a “complete EMR” — one which includes CCD transactions to share data, data warehousing and data continuity with the ED — in place as of the second quarter of this year.

So, how’s your facility doing?  Is it able to progress toward higher EMR goals? Or is it mired down with the 25 percent?

Virtualization, Speech Recognition App Use Growing Among Hospitals

Posted on October 21, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

Virtualization software and dictation with speech recognition are likely to see increased uptake among hospitals in coming years, according to data from HIMSS Analytics.

The data, which is drawn from its Essentials of the U.S. Hospital Market, Autumn 2013 report, suggests that virtualization and dictation with speech recognition are top areas for growth potential, ahead of most other apps profiled in the report.

According to a HIMSS statement, these findings are consistent with other research the organization has done in the past which has suggested growing adoption of voice recognition-based transcription technologies.

The HIMSS report also concludes that demand for ambulatory EMRs and ambulatory PACS seems to be growing, according to the press release.

My colleague John Lynn and I had a huddle to discuss these results and while I see the growth in demand for voice recognition, he’s a bit more skeptical.  In  his view, voice recognition hasn’t changed much over the last couple of years, so it’s not clear to him whey there’d be an upsurge in demand now. Did Siri-like technologies make us more comfortable with voice recognition?

The only exception to this, he suggested, may be some integration deals that Nuance did with Cerner and Epic that might cause an increase in voice recognition adoption. However, this will only be mostly those who wanted voice recognition already as opposed to converting new people to voice recognition.

On my end, I’m a bit more bullish on voice recognition technology, at least if EMRs are capable of parsing the narrative into fields in the EMR.  I’m aware of some EMR vendors and some independent software vendors that are doing this or headed in that direction.

As for virtualization, John is a bit more excited about the future. After all, as he notes, there’s some cost savings and redundancy, plus fail over, that are nice benefits of virtualization. He’s also a fan of its disaster recovery and business continuity capabilities, in that if one server dies, you can roll a whole virtual machine over to another seamlessly.

As for me, I’d argue that any technical trend you see here could be changed abruptly as the EMR market shifts. Let’s see how the next Meaningful Use phase, and the further consolidation of the EMR sector, affects what’s hot and what’s not.

Growing Number Of Children’s Hospitals Use EMRs

Posted on April 24, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

The number of children’s hospitals with EMRs in place — and compliant with Meaningful Use — has increased substantially over the last few years, though minor teaching and nonteaching institutions are not as far along, according to a new study appearing in the journal Pediatrics.

The study, which compares data on EMR adoption from 2008 with data on 2011, collected data from 126 children’s hospitals.  Researchers calculated EMR adoption rates by using existing definitions of the key functionalities which make up an EMR.  The study also looked at Meaningful Use compliance, which it evaluated by by checking whether a given hospital could meet 12 core Meaningful Use criteria.

The study found that between 2008 and 2011, the number of childrens’ hospitals with an EMR grew from 21 percent to 59 percent.  But even using 2011 data, only 29 percent of children’s hospitals had demonstrated that they could meet the 12 core criteria used as a Meaningful Use proxy.

All told, EMR adoption rates and Meaningful Use compliance rates were much higher for childrens’ hospitals than for adult hospitals as a whole.  However, the results were similar for adult and childrens’ teaching hospitals.

These results square well with an early 2012 report by HIMSS Analytics which looked at Meaningful Use Stage 1 compliance among hospitals. HIMSS found that teaching hospitals were one of the hospital types most likely to have embraced Meaningful Use.

The question, for me, is when childrens’ hospitals are going to step up further in their Meaningful Use efforts. I don’t know about you, but to me 29 percent compliance isn’t terribly impressive.

Top 10 Hospital EHR Vendors By Installed Systems

Posted on December 21, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit.

I came across this list of Top 10 Hospital EHR vendors by installed systems on Dark Daily (a great resource, particularly if you’re into Labs). The data is a little dated, but I thought it would be interesting to consider the numbers in 2011 and how they might look different today. Here’s the list:

Vendor Name Total Installations Percent of Installations
• Meditech 1212 25.50%
• Cerner 606 12.80%
• McKesson 573 12.10%
• Epic Systems 413 8.70%
• Siemens Healthcare 397 8.40%
• CPSI 392 8.30%
• Healthcare Management Systems 347 7.30%
• Self-developed 273 5.80%
• Healthland 223 4.70%
• Eclipsys (Bought by Allscripts) 185 3.90%

This list was taken from the HIMSS Analytics database. I wish I had access so I could compare these numbers for 2012. The interesting thing is that I’m not sure the Hospital EHR vendor numbers would be all that much different. Epic is the media darling, but its focus is squarely on the large hospital systems so they often lag behind when it comes to total installations.

Hospitals Slowly Moving Toward Stage 1 of Meaningful Use

Posted on February 18, 2012 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

A new report from HIMSS Analytics concludes that the inevitable is happening, but slowly. According to researchers, who reported their findings in December 2011, virtually all categories of hospitals are showing greater ability to achieve Meaningful Use Stage 1, including:

*  Academic medical centers

*  General med/surg hospitals

*  Hospitals with 400 to 499 licensed beds

*  Hospitals with 500+ licensed beds

*  Urban  hospitals

*  Multi-hospitals

*  Hospitals already at Stage 5, 6 and 7 on the HIMSS Analytics EMR Adoption Model (EMRAM)

According to HIMSS researchers, hospitals in the seven categories above are moving faster than their peers when it comes to IT adoption.  Hospitals at the high end of EMRAM are moving up more quickly, as well.  As hospitals geared up to meet Stage 1, researchers say, the number of hospitals at stages 6 and 7 of EMRAM is growing as well.

As we’ve previously noted here, however, calling this a success would be looking at the nearly empty glass as half-full.  Even HIMSS admits that only five percent of hospitals have achieved Stage 6 of the EMRAM model (give or take) and just 1.2 percent are at EMRAM Stage 7.

There is at least a little bit of good news.  Of the 585 hospitals surveyed by HIMSS,  about half are ready, most likely to be ready or somewhat likely to be ready to collect incentive payments this year.

The hospitals that reported being “somewhat likely” had achieved at least two menu items, and between five and nine of the core items needed to qualify for incentives.

But  hospitals with less than 100 beds — generally rural, critical access hospitals — are not doing even as well as their peers. Only 20 percent told HIMSS that they were ready or most likely to meet Stage One goals.

By the way, the HIMSS research included one discomfiting side note, on security. Of the 585 hospitals that weighed in, just 25 percent said that they protected EHR data by conducting and reviewing a security risk analysis, doing needed suricty updfates and correcting security deficiencies. Oops — there goes compliance witih 45 CFT 164.308 (a) (1), the relevant HIPAA security rule. But that’s a tale for a different blog item, isn’t it, folks?