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Nominate Someone to the #HIT100

Posted on July 4, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As has become a July 4th tradition, the healthcare IT social media community comes together to recognize the incredible people on healthcare social media that influence their lives. It’s called the #HIT100 and happens on Twitter with people nominating the people that influence them for good. It’s really simple to participate and a great way to show some gratitude and love for someone you appreciate. Here are the details from the official announcement:

Required hashtags:

(Each nomination should have all of these)

  • #HIT100 or #HIT99 (One or the other is required)
  • #HealthIT (Optional)
  • #HITsm (Optional)

Optional hashtags:

(Please use only one of them so that the analytics have value)

  • #FHIR (Optional)
  • #Interoperability (Optional)
  • #PersonalizedMedicine or #PrecisionMedicine (Optional)
  • #Genomics

Some rules will change this year due to the analytical tools being put in place for the first time:

NOMINATION RULES:

  1. Nominations start
    Friday July 1st 2016 at 6PM and end on Friday July 8th at 6PM
  2. Only one person at a time may be nominated.  Multi-nominations in one tweet will not be counted though they might form part of the analytical information base
  3. Only direct nominations will be counted.  Retweets will not be counted though they may be analyzed for further enjoyment
  4. Favorites will not be counted though they may be analyzed for further entertainment
  5. There will only be one cycle of nominations.  No delegates or super-delegates here
  6. I reserve the judgement to disqualify a nomination that I find suspicious for any reason
  7. You are encouraged to include one of the optional hashtags above so that we can process with analytics to get some statistics about each one of them
  8. You can add a sentiment to the end of the nomination
  9. You must have fun and please follow each other as you discover new members of our community

If that’s too confusing, here are a couple examples. You can copy and then edit as appropriate.

I nominate @ehrandhit to the #HIT100 list – #HealthIT #HITsm #FHIR – Because they curate amazing content!

I nominate @techguy to the #HIT100 list – #HealthIT #HITsm He offers great insights into #PrecisionMedicine

Join in the fun and recognize your favorite people on social media! Happy 4th of July!

HIMSS Social Media Ambassador Debate: FHIR and Patient Focus

Posted on June 8, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

While at HIMSS, I had a chance to do a “debate” with my good friend, partner and fellow HIMSS Social Media Ambassador, Shahid Shah. This was facilitated by Healthcare IT News, and the debate was moderated by Beth Jones Sanborn, Managing Editor of Healthcare Finance. Shahid and I had a good debate on the topics of healthcare interoperability and FHIR. Plus, we talked about the need for healthcare IT companies to focus on the patient and whether they deserve the bad rap they get or not. Enjoy the video debate below:
Read more..

A Complete Patient Record and You

Posted on March 9, 2016 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Erin Wold, Account Based Marketing Program Manager at Hitachi Data Systems. You can follow Erin on Twitter: @ErinEWold
Erin Wold
So we have discussed the first steps to getting an enterprise imaging facility but what does this and a complete patient record mean for the average patient? If I were to stop someone walking down Las Vegas Blvd (I would shoot for the more sober hours) and ask them “Who owns your medical records?” I am sure I would get the same look and response over and over. The look of confusion and the response of “my doctor’s office?”  This is exactly what enterprise data sharing is set out to change.

A complete patient record for the patient means that a patient can go from their primary care physician to sub specialist without having to call ahead and have their records faxed over. It means that in the case of an emergency room visit they don’t have to worry about leaving with paperwork and getting it back to their primary care physician. It means their records follow them to whatever doctor they (or their insurance) choose.

For example, a couple weeks ago I won myself a trip to the emergency room after cutting a chunk out of my hand while slicing vegetables on a mandolin. (OUCH!) Not knowing my experience in healthcare IT, the resident, who came in first, was checking off all the boxes and asked “do you have a primary care physician?” In my pain ridden and snarky voice I responded “Why does it matter? Your computer can’t talk to hers anyway.” He got a chuckle and said I had a good point and then asked if I was in healthcare. But we have all been there. We have seen one physician only to turn around and have to tell the story all over again with the follow-up care physician because the records just aren’t there.

Not to mention I had pictures of the wound on my phone I had taken right after the incident. My follow-up physician asked that I send her these photos so she could take a look (because she didn’t have access to photos snapped in the ER). I asked her if she could put them into my patient record being my PCP? Her response, “no I don’t have a way to get them uploaded.” Similar to what Alex Towbin, MD, Director of Radiology Informatics at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, said in his session at HIMSS16, he has multiple pics on his phone and there is nothing wrong security wise with that, but that’s not where the belong.

A complete patient record should include all medical data related to you. This includes images or all kinds whether an X-ray or photo snapped on an iPhone, textual reports (path, lab etc), and even larger data files including genome sequencing data, and digital breast tomosynthesis. I don’t think you would find one physician who would argue that any of your data is unimportant and can be left out.  In the wise words of John Halamaka, MD, CIO of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center the next time you ask why your patient record can’t be all in one and they (physicians or IT) respond because there is too much data to store, you should ask them “well how does Google do it then?”

De-silo Health IT

Posted on March 8, 2016 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Erin Wold, Account Based Marketing Program Manager at Hitachi Data Systems. You can follow Erin on Twitter: @ErinEWold
Erin Wold
So we have started on the path of enterprise imaging with redefining the EMR, but we can’t stop there. Although, I noticed more familiar faces at HIMSS16, there weren’t enough imaging professionals. We need to de-silo the IT departments within healthcare systems and align them with the strategy that IT is just technology whether it’s radiology, cardiology, mammography etc. The overall IT department should be focused on interoperability and coming together to create a cohesive EMR including enterprise imaging.

Imaging is no longer limited to radiology, yet we still have specific radiology IT staff. This creates more siloes. I have seen it time and time again where the specialty IT departments are at odds with the hospital IT because they want to claim ownership of the data. I can’t blame them though because if something goes wrong with that data they are held responsible. So I don’t blame them, but like redefining the EMR to include all types of data we have to align the IT departments to reflect the whole EMR.

There should no longer be specific departmental IT rather there should be one large IT team with breakout teams that are dedicated to specific departmental (cardiology, radiology, pathology, billing, etc.) software and applications like the PACS or picture archiving system. They should be under the EMR and be tuned into it to create a cohesive team that can complete the patient within the EMR. No more “this is my data and you can’t touch it.” It is now this data belongs to the patient and it needs to be readily available to the patient and all the point of care physicians.

We as vendors and providers need to think of the patient record as the point of documentation rather than each individual department and physician creates their report and then sends it to the referring physician. The patient’s team of physicians and departments where studies and test are completed should be considered team data.

Next time you head into your doctor or head to the ER ask the question: “What is your hospitals standard for sharing?” If they respond with “Well we’ll send you home with a CD or we’ll provide you with a paper print out of a PDF.” RUN and run far away from that place. While a CD may sound like a good idea I am pretty sure you don’t have a DICOM viewer in your basement to view these images. Most likely your point of care physician doesn’t have the same viewer as the images were taken on and what if the CD gets scratched in transfer or even worse lost. If you get my drift, a CD is not the answer. Those images belong in the EMR and so does the radiology software and application support staff.

If you think about it, when you log into an online banking account like Chase you don’t have to log into your mortgage, credit card, savings account, checking account and investment specialists to get all the additional information. You have ONE VIEW of all these accounts as soon as you log in. I don’t know about you, but I consider all my banking information: social security number, credit score, retirement savings as vital as my healthcare information and should be kept as secure. Therefore I see no reason that HIT shouldn’t be aligned more like banking and offer a complete patient record. HIMSS gives us an ideal platform to align all of these departments.

Redefining the EMR

Posted on March 7, 2016 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Erin Wold, Account Based Marketing Program Manager at Hitachi Data Systems. You can follow Erin on Twitter: @ErinEWold
Erin Wold
Walking through the HIMSS 2016 exhibit hall, booth after booth I see interoperability this and interoperability that. So I decided to stop and ask the vendors, “When you say interoperability, what do you mean?” Answer after answer I heard, “We integrate with the EMR and other vendors to provide data into the patient record.” When asked to clarify what types of data, the majority mentioned all types of textual data. Never once did anyone respond with images of any sort. I actually got the response of “Why would enterprise imaging be at HIMSS?” when I asked “What about enterprise imaging?”

Here ladies and gentlemen lies our problem. When going to HIMSS vendors and attendees alike aren’t thinking of enterprise imaging for the most part. When you search for sessions, very few pop up when searching for imaging. This year’s HIMSS has seen a few more familiar faces from the imaging scene which is extremely exciting for the future of healthcare and patient engagement.

I was able to sit in on multiple imaging sessions and was lucky enough to go to one that was actually about enterprise imaging but neither were titled or tagged that way in the program. All great sessions with very informative information on why enterprise imaging is a must. It is not only easier for the point of care physician to access the patient record but it will increase patient care and reduce time between study and treatment.

As we move into the era where telemedicine is becoming a reality and anyone can receive care at their corner Walgreens, enterprise imaging is crucial to patient care. How do we get there?  How do we get the EHR gurus to work with the imaging gurus. After sitting through a session led by Alex Towbin, MD, Director of Radiology Informatics at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital; I see how it needs to start.

It started right then and there after he said we must redefine EMR.  We as vendors and providers have defined the EMR as a repository for textual data. We have done ourselves a disservice and we now have to reverse it. The EMR should be a central location where the patients care team can enter ALL data that has been collected on that patient. In essence it should be more like your teenage cousin’s Facebook page where they put everything than your Myspace page from 10 years ago where nothing has been uploaded because you can’t remember the password to gain access.

I was shocked when John Hamlaka, MD, CIO of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, presented that only 50% of pediatric scans are read by the correct sub-specialist. This is in part due to the referring physician, the radiologist and the sub specialist lacking a way to share these scans and therefore the sub-specialist never knew it existed. Enterprise Imaging makes way for this to happen. Other risks that arise because of a lack of enterprise imaging: double exposure to radiation, misdiagnoses, crucial lapse in time between scan and start of treatment, and an incomplete patient record.

A step in the right direction was taken this year at HIMSS by aligning with SIIM or the Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine and hosting dual sessions as well as a meet-up at the HIMSS Spot. Eighteen months ago they created a coalition of innovative members from both organizations. Moving forward it will take leaders from medical societies: HIMSS, SIIM, RSNA, ACR,  etc. Redefining  is only the beginning. While it seems like a long, hard road ahead we have to start somewhere.

Data Blocking and other Loch Ness Monsters at #HIMSS16

Posted on March 2, 2016 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin is a true believer in #HealthIT, social media and empowered patients. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He currently leads the marketing efforts for @PatientPrompt, a Stericycle product. Colin’s Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung

A torrent of tweets was unleashed on Day 2 of #HIMSS16. According to Symplur, almost 30,000 tweets were sent with the #HIMSS16 hashtag yesterday.

One tweet was particularly memorable:

The quote comes from John Halamka, CIO of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, who was discussing the controversial act of information blocking – where vendors proactively block the sharing of information health information. John Lynn posted a fantastic summary of information blocking here.

That tweet stuck with me and for the rest of Day 2 at #HIMSS16 I was on the lookout for Loch Ness Monsters – things that get discussed, but are almost never seen.

Loch Ness Monster #2 – Interoperability

A close cousin to information blocking – interoperability has been a popular topic again this year at HIMSS. Many vendors are touting new APIs and tools that help make data exchange easier. The HHS even unveiled plans for several initiatives to pave the way for easier information sharing. However, like in previous years, there is a lot of talk, but very little action when it comes to interoperability.

There is frankly very little financial incentive for vendors and institutions to be open with their data. So until the economics change, interoperability will remain a Loch Ness Monster.

Loch Ness Monster #3 – Gender parity

The #HealthITChicks tweetup led by Jennifer Dennard of HISTalk highlighted the issue of gender inequality in healthcare IT. Dennard and a panel of three respected women leaders discussed the progress-made and the progress-yet-to-be made in terms of women being fully accepted as equals in the industry.

The panel pointed to the results of the annual HIMSS Leadership Survey which were revealed in a morning briefing. A key finding of the survey was gender-based pay inequality – “Evidence from the Compensation Survey, for example, suggest female health IT workers are being marginalized in this sector of the economy. Analyzed several different ways, women consistently earn less than their male counterparts. The findings also suggest females are under-represented in IT-related executive and senior management roles in the health sector.”

So apparently we talk a lot about women being equal, but the it’s simply not something that’s seen.

Loch Ness Monster #4 – Patients

HIMSS is by far the largest healthcare IT conference in North America. It attracts attendees from across the spectrum of healthcare. However, there is one stakeholder that is nearly absent – patients. Every vendor talks about including patients in the design of their products and how they consider themselves to be “patient centered” yet there are only a handful of patient advocates and e-Patients at the conference.

Progress has been made in the past few years in terms of patient scholarships, but more can be done to ensure that the voice of the patient is actually seen/heard at the annual HIMSS conference. It’s time for vendors and health institutions to step up.

Loch Ness Monster #5 – Stable WiFi

In the lunch lines, restroom lines and in the aisles of the Exhibit Hall, #HIMSS16 attendees were all asking each other if they knew of a good place to get a stable WiFi signal. To be fair, WiFi coverage this year has been much better than in years past, but there still plenty of people talking about “If you go over there by the window and just under the escalator you’ll get a strong signal”. On two occasions I want to the exact spot recommended by a fellow attendee – only to be disappointed with a single bar of signal strength. My hotspot has rarely seen this much activity in a single day.

What things have you HEARD at #HIMSS16 but have not actually SEEN?

Healthcare Interoperability

Posted on February 18, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

UPDATE: In case you missed our discussion, you can watch the video recording below:

Healthcare Interoperability-blog

One of the hottest topics in all of healthcare is the concept of healthcare interoperability. I remember when Farzad Mostashari said that he would use every lever he had at his disposal to make healthcare interoperability happen. Karen DeSalvo and Andy Slavitt have carried on that tradition and really wants to make interoperability of health data a reality in healthcare. However, it’s certainly not without it’s challenges.

With this challenge in mind, on Monday, February 22, 2016 at Noon ET (9 AM PT), I’ll be sitting down with two of the biggest healthcare intoperability nerds I know (I say that with a ton of affection since I love nerds) to talk about the topic. Here’s a little more info on the healthcare interoperability panel we’ll be having:

You can join our live conversation with Mario and Richard and even add your own comments to the discussion or ask them questions. All you need to do to watch live is visit this blog post on Monday, February 22, 2016 at Noon ET (9 AM PT) and watch the video embed at the bottom of the post or you can subscribe to the blab directly. We’ll be doing a more formal interview for the first 30 minutes and then open up the Blab to others who want to add to the conversation or ask us questions. The conversation will be recorded as well and available on this post after the interview.

In this discussion we’ll dive into the always popular FHIR standard and its potential to achieve “scalable interoperability” in health care. We’ll talk about FHIR’s weaknesses and challenges. Then, we’ll dive into health care interoperability testing and the recently announced AEGIS Touchstone Test platform and how it differs from other interoperability testing that’s being done today. We’ll talk about who’s paying for interoperability testing and where this is all headed in the future.

If you’d like to see the archives of Healthcare Scene’s past interviews, you can find and subscribe to all of Healthcare Scene’s interviews on YouTube.

Andy Slavitt Talks Healthcare Interoperability and Data Blocking

Posted on February 8, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In all the reporting around meaningful use being replaced (or as many mis-reported meaningful use ending), Andy Slavitt also made a number of other points in his talk at JP Morgan’s Healthcare conference. Much like he did with meaningful use, he live tweeted his talk. Here were a couple of his non-meaningful use tweets that stood out to me.

Has there ever been any doubt that HHS was serious about wanting organizations to be interoperable and for data blocking not to exist? There hasn’t for me. It’s been one of their main goals. The problem is two fold. First, CMS is fighting an uphill battle against the economic realities that not sharing data has been very profitable for healthcare organizations. Second, CMS only has so much power available to them to make interoperability a requirement.

Despite these challenges, CMS is doing everything in their power to encourage and promote interoperability. Put another way, they’re trying everything they can to make it so that interoperability is a wise business decision for healthcare organizations. Although, much of what they’re trying to do also harkens back to a statement I heard from Jonathan Bush, CEO of athenahealth that, “Interoperability should not be used as a point of competition.”

The problem is that today interoperability is used as a point of competition. We’re seeing that change, but it’s slow and there are still many who haven’t made the change. Plus, all of the interoperability solutions that have been offered (yes, I’m looking at the popular FHIR standard) are still quite limited in scope. They’re really just evolutions on existing interoperability and not a revolution to what interoperability should and could become.

Plus, I fear that many of these new interoperability options are really just creating a new market for vendors to charge providers. When you think about it, what’s the easiest way to block the sharing of information? Just charge too much for it. More on this in a future article.

Ironically, I think my perspective on Andy Slavitt’s comments on interoperability and information blocking are not all that different from my view on meaningful use. Andy and the people at CMS are saying the right things. They’re seeing the right dynamics at play in the market place. The problem is that they’re hands are tied in many ways and the bureaucratic process could lead to something even worse if they’re not careful. No doubt they’re dealing with really challenging, complex issues. It’s good to know that their hearts are in the right place. I just hope that regulation and legislation matches it.

Interoperability Challenges (VA, DOD, Epic, CommonWell) – Where Do We Go From Here?

Posted on November 16, 2015 I Written By

David is a global digital healthcare leader that is focusing on the next era of healthcare IT.  Most recently David served as the CIO at an academic medical center where he was responsible for all technology related to the three missions of education, research and patient care. David has worked for various healthcare providers ranging from academic medical centers, non-profit, and the for-profit sectors. Subscribe to David's latest CXO Scene posts here.

The state of healthcare in the United States is fairly well known with the US healthcare spend between 17-18% of the GDP. It is one of the most expensive countries in the world for healthcare. America is also one of the few developed nations not to have a universal healthcare scheme, and one of the main barriers is interoperability challenges.

As we have just finished celebrating veteran’s day, one of the challenges in our federal system is interoperability. In order to provide these veterans with proper healthcare, the Veterans Association and the Department of Defense each proposed an update to the way medical records were stored. The proposed system involved purchasing or customizing an existing an EMR software, which would allow doctors to access patient files far more easily.

This would make it easier for veterans to switch doctors without having to worry about taking large amounts of paperwork along with them. It would also allow doctors to give their patients the best care possible without having to worry about red tape and legal hoops they have to jump through. While this makes sense to everyone, a decision has been made to have two separate systems.

We are also having the same discussion in the commercial EMR space recently where representatives from Cerner asked Epic to joing the CommonWell Health Alliance. Based on my experience Epic has done a great job at exchanging data with other Epic customers. At the request of the customer, Epic will work on creating interoperability with other non-Epic systems. The challenge is the need to create a special request for data sharing every time an Epic customer wants to communicate with a non Epic facility.

The House of Representatives have questioned the VA and DOD decisions to create these separate EHR systems. This makes perfect sense since I am also questioning the decision myself. What should have happened in this situation is the VA and DOD should have come together to collaborate on one EHR system. At the same time, the federal government should step in to create a standard for interoperability and mandate that we move towards collaboration.   If you think about the impact that meaningful use had on transforming the healthcare sector’s move towards digital, I believe the government could have the same impact on interoperability if they made it a requirement.

Where’s Interoperability Happening in Healthcare?

Posted on October 19, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

My tweet this morning inspired this post. Interoperability this and interoperability that. We hear all about interoperability everywhere in healthcare. It’s so important that ONC has put together a 10 year plan for healthcare interoperability. We have more interoperability initiatives than we have actual interoperability. I asked one EHR vendor recently about their thoughts on interoperability and which interoperability initiatives they were involved in. They responded that they were taking part in all of them and then they started listing off them all: Common Well, Argonaut, etc etc etc.

With all of this talk about interoperability, you’d think we’d have a wave of success stories. It’s hard for me to believe that with the hundreds of millions of dollars that’s been spent on HIEs and who knows how much money being spent by private organizations, we don’t have a wave of success stories.

You’d think by this point we’d have so many stories of lives saves, costs reduced and care improved that every organization would have to hop on the healthcare interoperability bandwagon. Peer pressure is a real thing. It’s unfortunate that we don’t have so many good interoperability stories that the peer pressure for everyone to take part isn’t reaching a maximum level.

Sadly, I think the opposite is occurring. All of the stories say that healthcare interoperability isn’t happening. These stories provide peer pressure in the opposite direction. “No one is doing it, so why should I start?”

Although, I think the real problem with interoperability was highlighted in this recent press release about the KLAS Keystone Summit. KLAS brought together 12 EHR vendors (we’ll leave a discussion of which EHR vendors were left out for another post) to “independently and transparently measure/assess the status and trajectory of interoperability.”

While it’s great that these EHR vendors have started talking (5 years ago this would have been laughable), it’s disappointing that this meeting where they supposedly “agree” to an interoperability metric then says “The next step is to put a cohesive plan in place to launch and monitor the measurement.”

Excuse me if I’m skeptical, but I feel like I’ve been here before. A bunch of vendors get together and agree to interoperability. The next step is to put together a plan which never happens and never actually reaches reality. I feel like I’m in interoperability groundhog day.

This isn’t a knock on this specific meeting since it seems to be what’s happened at every meeting which has tried to work on interoperability. We have a nice kumbaya moment where all the EHR vendor executives get in a circle, hold hands and say we’re going to work together and then it never happens.

We need to have more stories shared about EHR vendors and healthcare organizations actually sharing data. That’s going to be the only thing that will turn the tide. I don’t even care if it’s really small data sets. Let’s stop talking about interoperability and start doing it.

If you know of places where interoperability is actually occurring, I’d love to hear about it. Please leave a note in the comment or on our contact us page.