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Healthcare Cloud Hosting with Chad Kissinger, Founder of OnRamp

Posted on November 8, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Cloud hosting is a reality in pretty much every healthcare organization. This is particularly true in hospitals that have hundreds of healthcare IT solutions with many of them being hosted in the cloud. While some are hosted in the health IT vendor’s cloud, I’m also seeing more and more hospitals looking to get out of the data center business and moving their various health IT software to a third party data center. I expect this trend will continue and we’ll eventually see hospitals who don’t have any onsite data center.

As the highly regulated healthcare IT world has moved to the cloud, I’ve seen data centers crop up that cater specifically to the needs of healthcare. One of those companies who’s focused on healthcare data center and cloud offerings is OnRamp. I recently sat down to interview Chad Kissinger, Founder of OnRamp, to learn more about their approach to healthcare cloud hosting and what makes healthcare hosting unique. I also talked with Chad about OnRamp’s recent HITRUST certification and what that means for healthcare providers and what OnRamp is doing to ensure security beyond the HITRUST certification. Plus, Chad offered some great insights into where he sees this all heading.

You can watch my full video interview with OnRamp CEO, Chad Kissinger, embedded at the bottom of this blog post, or click on any of the links below to skip to the sections of the interview that interest you most:

Be sure to Subscribe to Healthcare Scene on YouTube and check out all of our Healthcare IT video interviews and content.

Full Disclosure: OnRamp is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene.

Moving Hospital EHR to the Cloud

Posted on March 24, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve long been interested to see how hospitals were going to handle the shift to “the cloud.” Obviously, most hospitals have made a big infrastructure investment in huge data centers and so I’ve always known that the shift to the cloud would be slow. However, it also seemed like it was inevitable.

I was interested to hear Jason Mendenhall talk in our Healthcare Data Center Google Plus hangout about healthcare entities moving their technology infratructure into their data center. Plus, I pair that with the smaller rural hospital CIO I met who balked at the idea of having a data center or really even having any sys admin people on staff.

Plus, I’m reminded of this quote I heard Dr. Andy Litt tell me about when hospitals will start using Dell to host their Epic EHR:

The opportunity to host an Epic or other EHR is in first install, not for existing ones that have invested in a data center already. -Andy Litt, MD, Dell

I can’t imagine that many institutions really want to move their Epic EHR hosted locally into the cloud. That just doesn’t happen. At least it doesn’t right now. Will we see this change?

I think the answer to that is that we will see it change. There’s a really good argument to make that hospitals shouldn’t be building data centers and that there’s tremendous value to using an outside provider. Plus, many of these “data center” companies are becoming more than just a set of rails, power, and cooling. They are now working with a variety of cloud providers that can provide you more than just a place to put your own servers.

I’ll be interested to see how this plays out, but I think we’ll see fewer and fewer hospital data centers. The outside options and connectivity to those outside data centers is so good that there’s going to be no need to do it on your own.