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KLAS Summit: Interoperability Doing the Work to Move HealthIT Forward

Posted on October 9, 2017 I Written By

Healthcare as a Human Right. Physician Suicide Loss Survivor.
Janae writes about Artificial Intelligence, Virtual Reality, Data Analytics, Engagement and Investing in Healthcare.
twitter: @coherencemed

I had the privilege of attending the KLAS research event with leaders in patient data interoperability. From the ONC to EHR vendors- executives from EHR vendors and hospital systems made their way to a summit about standards for measurement and improvement. These meetings are convened with the mutual goal of contributing to advancement in Health IT and improvement of patient outcomes. I’m a big fan of collaborative efforts that produce measurable results. KLAS research is successfully convening meetings everyone in the HealthIT industry has said are necessary for progress.

The theme of Interoperability lately is: Things are not moving fast enough.

The long history of data in health records and variety in standards across records have created a system that is reluctant to change. Some EMR vendors seem to think the next step is a single patient record- their record.

Watching interactions between EHR vendors and the ONC was interesting. Vendors are frustrated that progress and years of financial investment might be overturned by an unstable political atmosphere and lack of funding. Additionally, device innovation and creation is changing the medical device landscape at a rapid rate. We aren’t on the same page with new data and we are creating more and more data from disparate sources.

Informatics experts in healthcare require a huge knowledge base to organize data sharing and create a needs based strategy for data sharing. They have such a unique perspective across the organization. Few of the other executives have the optics into the business sense of the organization. They have to understand clinical workflows and strategy., as well as financial reimbursement. Informatics management is a major burden and responsibility- they are in charge of improving care and making workflows easier for clinicians and patients. EMR use has frequently been cited as a contributor to physician burnout and early retirement. Data moving from one system can have a huge impact on care delivery costs and patient outcomes. Duplicated tests and records can mean delayed diagnosis for surgeons and specialists. Participants of the summit discussed that patients can be part of improving data sharing.

We have made great progress in terms of interoperability but there is still much to be done. Some of the discussion was interesting, such as the monumental task the VA has in patient data with troop deployment and care. There was also frank discussion about business interests and data blocking ranging from government reluctance to create a single patient identifier to a lack of resources to clean duplicated records.

Stakeholders want to know what the next steps are- how do we innovate and how do we improve from this point forward? Do we create it internally or partner with outside vendors for scale? They are tired of the confusion and lack of progress. Participants want more. I asked a few participants what they think will help things move forward more quickly. Not everyone really knows how to make things move forward faster.

Keith Fraidenburg of CHIME praised systems for coming together and sharing patient data- to improve patient outcomes. I spoke with him about the Summit itself and his work with informatics in healthcare. He discussed how the people involved in this effort are some of the hardest working people in healthcare. Their expertise in terms of clinical knowledge and data science is highly specialized and has huge implications in patient outcomes.

“To get agreement on standards would be an important big step forward. It wouldn’t solve everything but to get industry wide standards to move things forward the industry needs a single set of standards or a playbook.”

We might have different interests, but the people involved in interoperability care about interoperability advancement. Klas research formed a collaborative of over 31 organizations that are dedicated to giving great feedback and data about end users. The formation of THE EMR Improvement Collaborative can help measure the success of data interoperability. Current satisfaction measures are helpful, but might not give health IT experts and CMIOs and CIOs the data they need to formulate an interoperability strategy.

The gaps in transitions of care is a significant oversight in the existing interoperability marketplace. Post acute organizations have a huge need for better data sharing and interorganizational trust is a factor. Government mandates about data blocking and regulating sharing has a huge impact on data coordination. Don Rucker, MD, John Fleming, MD, Genevieve Morris and Steve Posnack participated in a listening session about interoperability.  Some EMR vendors mentioned this listening session and ability to have a face to face meeting were the most valuable part of the Summit.

Conversations and meetings about interoperability help bridge the gaps in progress. Convening the key conversations between stakeholders helps healthcare interoperability move faster. There is still work to be done and many opportunities for innovation and improvement. Slow progress is still progress. Sharing data from these efforts by the KLAS research team shows a dedication to driving interoperability advancement. We will need better business communication between stakeholders and better data sharing to meet the needs of an increasingly complex and data rich world.

What do you think the next steps are in interoperability?

AHA Asks Congress To Reduce Health IT Regulations for Medicare Providers

Posted on September 22, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

The American Hospital Association has sent a letter to Congress asking members to reduce regulatory burdens for Medicare providers, including mandates affecting a wide range of health IT services.

The letter, which is addressed to the House Ways and Means Health subcommittee, notes that in 2016, CMS and other HHS agencies released 49 rules impacting hospitals and health systems, which make up nearly 24,000 pages of text.

“In addition to the sheer volume, the scope of changes required by the new regulations is beginning to outstrip the field’s ability to absorb them,” says the letter, which was signed by Thomas Nickels, executive vice president of government relations and public policy for the AHA. The letter came with a list of specific changes AHA is proposing.

Proposals of potential interest to health IT leaders include the following. The AHA is asking Congress to:

  • Expand Medicare coverage of telehealth to patients outside of rural areas and expand the types of technology that can be used. It also suggests that CMS should automatically reimburse for Medicare-covered services when delivered via telehealth unless there’s an individual exception.
  • Remove HIPAA barriers to sharing patient medical information with providers that don’t have a direct relationship with that patient, in the interests of improving care coordination and outcomes in a clinically-integrated setting.
  • Cancel Stage 3 of the Meaningful Use program, institute a 90-day reporting period for future program years and eliminate the all-or-nothing approach to compliance.
  • Suspend eCQM reporting requirements, given how difficult it is at present to pull outside data into certified EHRs for quality reporting.
  • Remove requirements that hospitals attest that they have bought technology which supports health data interoperability, as well as that they responded quickly and in good faith to requests for exchange with others. At present, hospitals could face penalties for technical issues outside their control.
  • Refocus the ONC to address a narrower scope of issues, largely EMR standards and certification, including testing products to assure health data interoperability.

I am actually somewhat surprised to say that these proposals seem to be largely reasonable. Typically, when they’re developed by trade groups, they tend to be a bit too stacked in favor of that group’s subgroup of concerns. (By the way, I’m not taking a position on the rest of the regulatory ideas the AHA put forth.)

For example, expanding Medicare telehealth coverage seems prudent. Given their age, level of chronic illness and attendant mobility issues, telehealth could potentially do great things for Medicare beneficiaries.

Though it should be done carefully, tweaking HIPAA rules to address the realities of clinical integration could be a good thing. Certainly, no one is suggesting that we ought to throw the rulebook out the window, it probably makes sense to square it with today’s clinical realities.

Also, the idea of torquing down MU 3 makes some sense to me as well, given the uncertainties around the entirety of MU. I don’t know if limiting future reporting to 90-day intervals is wise, but I wouldn’t take it off of the table.

In other words, despite spending much of my career ripping apart trade groups’ legislative proposals, I find myself in the unusual position of supporting the majority of the ones I list above. I hope Congress gives these suggestions some serious consideration.

Data Sharing Largely Isn’t Informing Hospital Clinical Decisions

Posted on July 6, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

Some new data released by ONC suggests that while healthcare data is being shared far more frequently between hospitals than in the past, few hospital clinicians use such data regularly as part of providing patient care.

The ONC report, which is based on a supplement to the 2015 edition of an annual survey by the American Hospital Association, concluded that 96% of hospitals had an EHR in place which was federally tested and certified for the Meaningful Use program. That’s an enormous leap from 2009, the year federal economic stimulus law creating the program was signed, when only 12.2% of hospitals had even a basic EHR in place.

Also, hospitals have improved dramatically in their ability to share data with other facilities outside their system, according to an AHA article from February. While just 22% of hospitals shared data with peer facilities in 2011, that number had shot up to 57% in 2014. Also, the share of hospitals exchanging data with ambulatory care providers outside the system climbed from 37% to 60% during the same period.

On the other hand, hospitals are not meeting federal goals for data use, particularly the use of data not created within their institution. While 82% of hospitals shared lab results, radiology reports, clinical care summaries or medication lists with hospitals or ambulatory care centers outside of their orbit — up from 45% in 2009 — the date isn’t having as much of an impact as it could.

Only 18% of those surveyed by the AHA said that hospital clinicians often used patient information gathered electronically from outside sources. Another 35% reported that clinicians used such information “sometimes,” 20% used it “rarely” and 16% “never” used such data. (The remaining 11% said that they didn’t know how such data was used.)

So what’s holding hospital clinicians back? More than half of AHA respondents (53%) said that the biggest barrier to using interoperable data integrating that data into physician routines. They noted that since shared information usually wasn’t available to clinicians in their EHRs, they had to go out of the regular workflows to review the data.

Another major barrier, cited by 45% of survey respondents, was difficulty integrating exchange information into their EHR. According to the AHA survey, only 4 in 10 hospitals had the ability to integrate data into their EHRs without manual data entry.

Other problems with clinician use of shared data concluded that information was not always available when needed (40%), that it wasn’t presented in a useful format (29%) and that clinicians did not trust the accuracy of the information (11%). Also, 31% of survey respondents said that many recipients of care summaries felt that the data itself was not useful, up from 26% in 2014.

What’s more, some technical problems in sharing data between EHRs seem to have gotten slightly worse between the 2014 and 2015 surveys. For example, 24% of respondents the 2014 survey said that matching or identifying patients was a concern in data exchange. That number jumped to 33% in the 2015 results.

By the way, you might want to check out this related chart, which suggests that paper-based data exchange remains wildly popular. Given the challenges that still exist in sharing such data digitally, I guess we shouldn’t be surprised.

ONC Releases HIE Toolkit For Rural Healthcare

Posted on March 18, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

The ONC has released a new toolkit designed to help rural healthcare players such as rural hospitals, critical access hospitals, clinics and state offices of rural health to participate in HIEs, iHealthBeat reports.

Here’s a summary of what the toolkit contains, courtesy of iHealthBeat:

The toolkit release follows on ONC head Farzad Mostashari’s announcement that this will be the year providers are pushed hard to go for interoperability.

Expect to see more efforts of this kind as ONC nobly soldiers along, suffering from a trimmed budget due to sequestration, attempting to close the gaps vendors seem loathe to close.

Yes, as Mostashari notes in an interview with HealthcareITNews, Meaningful Use Stage 2 pushes the vendors a long way toward interoperability:

Vendors are really going to have to step up to the plate in terms of being able to achieve the Stage 2 expectations for true vendor-to-vendor coded, clinical structured, documents being able to have kind of ubiquitous protocols with security in place. That’s a big step for the industry and meaningful use Stage 2 sets the tempo and expectations for that.

But vendors have proved amazingly agile at wiggling out of interoperability promises to date. Let’s see if MU Stage 2 finally breaks the deadlock.