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KLAS Reports Cerner and Epic Combined to Capture More Than 3/4 of New Large Hospital EMR Contracts

Posted on August 28, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit.

This tweet and associated messages are circling all around social media. Here’s the short description of the KLAS report:

HITECH has drastically changed the acute care EMR market. Previous industry mainstays like GE Healthcare and QuadraMed have effectively dropped out. McKesson has promoted their community hospital solution, Paragon, over their former flagship, Horizon. Allscripts, MEDITECH, and Siemens are all racing to recover from past stumbles and regain market share. Since meaningful use became a reality, Cerner and Epic have captured a large majority of new hospital contracts. However, there are still many decisions to be made in coming years and the remaining market is potentially more competitive than in years past.

For those of us following the industry, this isn’t really big news. Cerner and Epic have been battling for the big hospitals for quite a while. In fact, coming out of this year’s HIMSS I was more interested in the battle for small hospitals than large hospitals. Of course, we’ll see how hospital consolidation affects this as well.

What does seem clear and this report confirms is that Epic and Cerner all well positioned in the large hospital EMR market. I predict they’ll dominate until at least the end of meaningful use.

Top Inpatient EHR Vendors – 2013 Black Book Rankings

Posted on February 22, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit.

I think that most of you know how I feel about the various EHR ranking systems. They all have their issues, but they are another interesting data point in the search for the right EHR. Plus, the EHR ranking trends over time can be interesting. Not to mention, it’s hard not to look at a post that has rankings. It’s almost un-American not to look.

So, I figured I’d post some of the Black Book Rankings over the next week. The following are the Top Ranked EHR Vendors for Inpatient Hospital Systems, Chains and IDN (in alphabetical order).

4MEDICA
ALLSCRIPTS
CPSI
EPIC
GE HEALTHCARE
HCS EMR
HEALTH MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS
HEALTHLAND
INFOMEDIKA
KEANE
MCKESSON
MEDITECH
NEXTGEN
PROGNOSIS HIT
QUADRAMED
SEQUEL
SIEMENS
UNI/CARE
VERSASUITE

Not too many surprises on the list. Was their any Hospital EHR vendor that you think should have made it on this list? I think this list would be more interesting if it just ranked the top 5 Hospital EHR vendors.

HIE and Other Interoperability Solutions for Healthcare

Posted on September 19, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit.

I was participating in a LinkedIn discussion a few months back about HIE solutions. Jeremy Bikman from Katalus Advisors offered this great list of HIE and other interoperability solutions for healthcare:

- Orion. Love these guys. Top notch products. Great service. Great UIs and culture too.
dbMotion. Another great firm. Top R&D in Israel. To-die-for partnership with UPMC
Axolotl (United). One of the first to really do HIEs. Good number of clients. Access to a lot of stuff by being owned by a mega-Payer.
Medicity (Aetna). See comments on Axolotl. Bought Novo Innovations which makes them super good at Amb-to-Acute connections. I know several of their execs and they are good honest guys.
Microsoft/GE/Whatever the JV will be called [This commentary is a few months old. I'm sure Jeremy knows it's called Caradigm now]. They have a few very large and advanced HIEs (WHIE being the foremost of its kind). Remains to be seen what will become of it with so many top leaders leaving.
ICA. John Tempesco from ICA described their offering this way, “With our new approach to HIE deployment, we’ve been experiencing very good success in deploying our CareConnect clinical communication capabilities to enable clinicians in rural settings to attach clinical documentation and have true conversations in a secure environment at very low entry points and high adoption. See more at www.icainformatics.com to review our solution page.”

There are dozens of other vendors that claim to do it (and have one or two psuedo-HIEs here and there) including many of the inpatient and outpatient EMR vendors (Greenway just landed a big chunk of the state of Idaho) but I won’t mention those like Epic that have a great HIE offering (so long as the other orgs in the HIE also have Epic).

I think this is a good way to look at the various vendors and how their customer bases match their company culture as Jeremy pointed out. Are there other HIE solutions that should be on this list?

Microsoft, GE Creating (Me Too?) Platform For Integrating Clinical Apps

Posted on December 9, 2011 I Written By

Katherine Rourke is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Here’s an fun announcement, a bit light on the details but certainly fascinating enough just by virtues of the companies involved. Microsoft and GE’s healthcare IT business have announced that they’re creating an open platform allowing providers and ISVs to create next-gen clinical apps.

Exactly what apps, the announcement doesn’t say, though it hints at fashionable stuff like population health management. (I think that’s corporate-ese for “we’re not sure what we’ve got yet.”)

Clearly, MS and GE are getting wind of efforts by firms like SAP — which has promised to deliver an abstraction layer which can bring myriad data sources into a single happy EMR database.  With the need for integrated health analytics growing stronger by the minute, health IT middleware has never been sexier.

The MS/GE joint venture brings a number of existing properties to the mix, including:

* Microsoft Amalga, an “enterprise health intelligence platform”

* Single sign-on and context management solution Microsoft Vergence

* GE Healthcare eHealth, an HIE platform

* Microsoft expreSSO, an  enterprise single sign-on solution

Perhaps the most interesting item on the list is GE Healthcare Qualibria. Qualibria is a clinical knowledge app GE is developing in partnership with Intermountain Healthcare and Mayo Clinic, both known for being innovative and forward-looking where quality analytics are concerned.

Not surprisingly, GE Healthcare IT will also be developing its own healthcare apps on the platform, which will be designed to connect with a broad cross-section of existing health IT products.

The stated function of the new platform, as stated in the two companies’ press release,  is “helping healthcare organizations and professionals use real-time, systemwide intelligence to improve healthcare quality and the patient experience.”

The real function, at this point, is “don’t let other enterprise IT companies jump ahead in healthcare IT,” I’d say. But clearly something cool could come out of this at some point, particularly from providers like Intermountain and Mayo. So stay tuned.

Data reporting bugs found in GE EMR products

Posted on October 24, 2011 I Written By

Katherine Rourke is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Sure, you’re an IT professional, and you’re not exactly shocked by news that a vendor has found some bugs in its code. (In fact, the more cynical out there probably start to wonder what’s up when they don’t get bug reports.)

That being said, with Meaningful Use at a white heat, this is a particularly bad time for an EMR vendor to find problems with the data reporting functions. Unfortunately for them (and possibly, you) that’s just what GE Healthcare is facing.

Last week, GE Healthcare announced what it termed “inaccuracies” in the reporting functions contained within its Centricity Electronic Medical Record and Centricity Practice Solution products.  The division’s VP and general manager sent out a letter to users last Thursday saying the problems might create flaws in results from SAP’s Crystal Reports or GE’s Medical Quality Improvement Consortium.

While the vendor promises to send out an update that will fix everything by November, right now you’d best not try to attest for MU. Not fun.

Worse, if yo u’ve already attested, GE’s suggesting nicely that you re-run reports for your attestation period and see if you still meet MU standards. Even less fun.

I’m not writing this to wail on GE  — I’m sure execs there are suffering enough  — but to simply give the story a bit more play, as I haven’t seen it tweeted or Facebooked as widely as I’d have expected.

More importantly, perhaps, I though it was worth asking the following. What happens if in the rush to help providers meet MU deadlines, other vendors have made slip ups they haven’t discovered yet? What if other major vendors discover flaws in EMRs that could jeopardize attestations nationwide?

And what do you plan to do, if anything, to make sure you’re not caught unprepared if your vendor has to fess up to serious problems like these?

Hospitals Choosing EMRs/EHRs Based on Integrated Options

Posted on August 5, 2011 I Written By

Katherine Rourke is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

For quite some time, hospitals have chosen to patch together existing systems and link them to their new, fancy EMR/EHR system. But lately, EMRs that offer better end-to-end integration are beginning to be hospitals’ first choices, according to research released last month by healthcare vendor research firm KLAS.

As everyone knows, Meaningful Use rules have thrown hospital EMR adoption efforts into high gear over the past couple of years. Just as importantly, MU gave providers an excuse to spend on new, integrated clinical data technology rather than slapping together old clinical systems with spackle and electrical tape.

Not only are the new, integrated systems easier to use — as they make it simpler to review and manage data across the enterprise — they’re also easier to maintain, KLAS notes. Of course, integrated systems created the dreaded vendor lock-in, but these days perhaps that’s a risk hospitals have decided to face.

Recent KLAS data on hospitals with over 200 beds suggests that the Epic juggernaut continues to pick up speed. Apparently, Epic ranked first in new hospital contracts for hospitals in this size range. According to KLAS, Epic is impressing hospitals with its ability to integrate systems, even though, in KLAS’ words, “they lag behind in technology and are not the cheapest solution available.”  (Hey, KLAS said it, not me.)

Another vendor turning up among KLAS’ winners’ list is Cerner, which came in second after Epic. Many of the new Cerner sales were to existing customers who’d previously implemented the big vendor’s system in other facilities, KLAS reports.

Just for the record, other EMR/EHR vendors doing well in the 200+ bed hospital category include Allscripts (Eclipsys), GE Healthcare, McKesson, NEDITECH, QuadraMed and Siemens.

My bet is that the high-ticket EMR spending spree will slow down within a year or so, as hospital IT directors begin to feel, well, rooked by the big-ticket vendors selling jury-rigged, hard-to-use technology. But for the time being, I guess price is, well, not too big an object.