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Has Epic Grown Too Big, Too Fast?

We’ve written a lot of posts over the years about some of the challenges that Epic has faced as it’s grown its EHR business. In fact, Anne Zieger’s post yesterday about a Hospital Credit Rating Lowered due to their Epic Project is one example. However, I was really struck by this reader submitted article on HIStalk.

The article is written by a “Long-Time Epic Customer”. You don’t get the sense that this customer is bitter or has any real dog in the fight. In fact, if anything this customer seems to have a love for Epic and they want Epic to win the EHR battle. However, they’re concerned by the changes that they’ve seen in Epic as its grown. His a paragraph from the article:

We installed Epic years ago, but have seen a vast difference between our prior experience and a recent rollout of newer products. The method where time was taken to help us build our own system has been replaced by a rushed, prefab Model system installed by staff where even the advisers and escalation points at Epic have little knowledge of their applications. Epic has always had newer people, but it was much more common to have advisers during the install who did have experience to watch for pitfalls.

The writer then goes on to describe how Epic seems to be investing in the wrong things. “We’re getting answers, solutions, fixes, and reports slower than ever.”

I think the reason many of things really struck a chord with me is that they’re matching up with many of the things I’ve seen and heard. Based on some real anecdotal things I’ve heard I won’t be surprised if Judy decides to get out of the day to day work at Epic sometime soon. We’ll see how it plays out, but an Epic without Judy at the helm will be quite different.

November 8, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

EMR Upgrade Cycles are Painful – Are You Prepared for Them?

Everyone gets so excited and worked up about the initial EMR implementation, but so many discount the effort that’s required for every EMR update cycle as well. Dr. Jayne from HIStalk gave a great first person perspective on EMR update cycles:

I figure I’ve got about two weeks of the good life left and then I’m going to be back in an upgrade cycle with all the standing meetings that entails. I’ll be back in the trenches testing workflows and trying to find defects as quickly as possible so that our vendor can roll them into patches before we go live. Every time we upgrade it reminds me more and more of some kind of military assault. I’m not sure if it’s just the way we run them or a little bit of post-traumatic stress. Maybe it’s a little of both.

I’m also reminded of Heather Haugen’s comments about EHR upgrade cycles: “software upgrades erode adoption over time and so with every upgrade you need a commensurate effort to retrain adoption.” Far too often organizations underestimate the impact and challenge associated with EMR upgrades.

Over the next couple years, those upgrades will likely be tied to an organization’s meaningful use plan. So, those will likely go better than some nebulous EMR upgrade plan. However, those organizations who underestimate the impact of EMR upgrades on their organization will pay the price later.

I know that many believe that in the large hospital space it’s a two horse race between Cerner and Epic. However, when you consider the challenges and costs associated with upgrading those software, don’t be surprised if some smaller scrappy startup can exploit the EMR upgrade opportunity. I don’t think it will happen until after meaningful use and EHR incentive money run their course, but it will happen.

October 7, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

Lessons Learned from Sutter’s EHR Implementation Challenges

One of our more popular recent posts was published on EMR and HIPAA and was titled, “Adding Insult To Injury, Sutter’s Epic EMR Crashes For A Day.” When the post was shared on LinkedIn, it prompted a really insightful discussion on EMR training and Sutter’s approach to EHR implementation. A few of the comments were so good that I wanted to share them for more people to read and learn.

The first comment is from Scott Kennedy, an Epic Stork Trainer:

I was an Epic training consultant on the E. Bay Sutter EHR implementation and I can tell you first hand that Sutter Admin, and the Nurses are at odds. This unfortunate relationship made it difficult to train the staff. Epic itself is not to blame. Those who are using the Epic EHR are not as trained as they should be.

Sutter used an “in house” training team rather than bringing on a full consulting team with much more experience in training and educating end users. The “in house’ trainers included some nurses, RTs, and the like as well as a host of newly graduated college students who had less to no experience with conducting a formal training presentation on a multidisciplinary EHR.

Hiring and training “in house” is a great addition to bringing on an experienced, skilled, professional team of Epic credentialed trainers, like myself who do this as a profession all over the country.

We were also directed by Sutter EHR implementation Administration to “facilitate” rather than “train.” “Facilitate included passing out exercise booklets to the clinical end users and having them work on their own, rather than conducing concise, lectured, guided practice prior to each exercise. Hands on exercises are an essential part of the training, but should not be the complete focus of training.

The learner is left on their own to figure out the system, which is counter productive. That approach only builds anxiety, confusion and eventual resentment for the system and the administration who have chosen the EHR they are fumbling through.

I empathize with the clinical end users. There training experience could have been much more instrumental in getting them off on the right foot with their new EHR, had the training approach been more adult learning theory based rather than self-learning based.

I only wish I could come back to Sutter and retrain the nurses and other clinicians from the proven, consistent, progressive, successful adult learning approach, which enables and empowers the end user to grasp, comprehend and assimilate the EHR system into their daily shift work flow. That is not to say that there are not implementation bumps and optimization needs that have to be addressed, but they are far less impactful when the clinician is properly trained.

I am so sorry Sutter nurses and staff that I trained, but I was firmly told to “facilitate” your learning rather than “train” you. I tried to implement adult learning methodology, but was told by your EHR administration to “stop talking and let them do it on their own.”

Epic EHR is not to blame here. Epic is a sound, EHR system that is serving the needs of millions of patients and their care providers around the world, without incidents such as those being experienced at Sutter.

There is a right way to implement and train and a wrong way. Sorry Sutter EHR implementation administration, but “I told you so!”

I asked Scott Kennedy if he’d thought of leaving the project since it was being done the wrong way and he offered the following response:

@ John, yes I did come very close to leaving the project. As a matter of fact after I was verbally “scolded” for lecturing to much I phoned my recruiter and asked to be placed on another project, but then, after careful thought, I decided to stay on the project and attempt to train and support as much as I could. But it seems that my individual efforts were not enough to counter the original training “facilitation” focus.

To add insult to injury those of us trainers who were there for the Sutter E. Bay implementation were told not to return for the W. Bay implementation. The EHR administration wanted an entirely new outside consulting team.

I got a fellow colleague on the project, hoping that the E. Bay administration would have learned from and the current W. Bay implementation would be better. The training colleague I got on the W. Bay project shared with me that it was worse than the E. Bay implementation. They kept the experienced Epic trainers as support and utilized them as little as possible for actual front end training. So sad, really.

The EHR administration at Sutter tried to cut every financial corner possible and lost sight of the long run implications of improper front end training. Now they are paying the price.

Michael A. P., an EMR consultant offered this insight as well:

I’ve also had the misfortune of working with Sutter for a (thankfully) brief period. In their long history of attempting to implement Epic, they could be counted on to make the wrong decision in almost every situation. Their internal politics trump the advice they receive from vendors and highly experienced consultants. The result is an implementation that serves neither the patient or the users best interests.

Then, Ryan Thousand, an IT Architect at Athens Regional Medical Center, offered a broader view of what’s happening in health IT and EHR:

I hate to say it but most large healthcare organizations are getting like this as well…. There are WAY too many layers in these organizations and sometimes to get work done can mean 4 weeks of executive meetings and in the end no decision or 100% opposite of the recommended direction given. That being said, with the rapid change in healthcare and the mergers and acquisitions occurring right now, I fear the worries for Healthcare in general over the next couple of years. We cannot continue to try to meet mandates the government is making while still ensuring 100% utmost patient care; and in the end that is really all I care about.. the patient in the bed who is BENEFITING from my implementation. Change is always tough but done the right way with the right people (as you all stated above was not done correctly) we will continue to see great things happen on the HIT side. But unless Epic/Cerner all the big players in the markets as well as the local clinician and providers work together and decide the best outcomes for our patients, we will all one day suffer, as we will all one day be patients.

In all the years I’ve been writing about EMR and EHR, the biggest problem with most EMR implementations is lack of EHR training or poor EHR training. It’s really amazing the impact quality EHR training can have on an implementation. However, many organizations use that as a way to save money. If they could only see the long term costs of that choice.

September 25, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

Judy Faulkner Interoperability Chart

Farzad Mostashari shared the following tweet which includes a picture of the growth in standards-based exchange per Judy Faulkner.

Here’s a blown up version of the chart (click on the image for an even larger version):
Epic Data Sharing Chart

As Farzad notes in the tweet, the patient records exchanged per month is now up to 1.25 million. It’s also worth noting that the red bar in the chart is exchange of records from Epic to Epic. The Green bar in the charts is from Epic to Non-Epic. I hope that green bar continues to grow since as the chart displays, that’s a definite shift in strategy for Epic. Let’s hope this shift continues until the data in healthcare is available where it’s needed when it’s needed.

September 18, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

Epic Rollout Contributes To $55M Loss At NC Hospital

It’s no secret that rolling out an Epic EMR is a big-ticket investment. What’s also becoming apparent is that some of the hospitals that take the plunge can’t really afford to pay for what they’ve bought, much less staff and develop an Epic presence.

The latest Epic EMR financial casualty to cross my desk is Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center which, according to the Winston-Salem Journal, saw a $55.1 million operational loss partly due its Epic rollout during fiscal 2012-13.

In a regulatory filing directed to bond investors, Wake Forest Baptist said that the Epic implementation had a substantial negative impact on fiscal 2013 due to both direct implementation costs and associated indirect expenses, according to the Winston-Salem Journal.

While the hospital’s stock investment gains of about $54 million helped offset most of the operational loss, leaving the overall loss at a much smaller $571,000, this fiscal year’s performance is still much worse than the previous year, when Wake Forest had $45.8 million in operational revenue and overall excess revenue of $88.7 million, the newspaper reports.

But the direct expenses and development costs weren’t the real capper, the newspaper said. The biggest Epic-related blow to Wake Forest Baptist came from $53.7 million in indirect impact, including $36.9 million of lost margin due to volume disruptions during the initial go-live and post go-live optimization. On top of that, the hospital reported $16.8 million in other Epic-related implementation expenses.

And that led to a shakeup in the C-suite. Giving the lie to the notion that nobody ever got in trouble for buying Epic, earlier this year, the hospital’s chief information officer of Wake Forest Baptist resigned in the middle of the troubled Epic launch.

In the article, the newspaper reports that Wake Forest Baptist “remains confident in Epic’s long-term benefit to the center”, and that hospital CEO Dr. John McConnell believes that the install “was absolutely necessary for patient safety,” he told the Winston-Salem Journal .

While it may turn out to be true that Wake Forest Baptist will be able to improve patient safety using its Epic EMR, in the mean time it’s having cut back on staff to pay for that gain. According to the newspaper, the center had planned to eliminate at least 950 jobs during the recent fiscal year;  some were not eliminated but may be during this fiscal year.

September 10, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies.

Hospital EMR and EHR Stats

Today I wanted to take a minute to spotlight the advertisers that support the work we do here at Hospital EMR and EHR. This site has grown much faster than I could have imagined. Considering the shift from ambulatory to hospital environments, this probably should be a surpise. Regardless, thanks so much for reading, sharing and commenting.

Since Hospital EMR and EHR started, we’ve had 264,953 pageviews to the site. Not too bad for this being the 399th post and we’ve had 689 comments. As an interesting side note we’ve had 48,091 spam comments. Thank goodness for spam filters. Here are the top 5 blog posts based on number of views:
Why Is It So Hard to Become a Certified Epic consultant?
Could Epic End Up The Victim Of Its Own EMR Success?
Soarian: Does Siemens Finally Have an Epic-Killer?
Why Do People Dislike Epic So Much? Let Me Count The Ways
Did Epic Kiss Off A California Customer (And Try to Get Its CIO Fired)?

All of the posts are from the middle of 2011. So, maybe the top posts idea isn’t fair to those posts that were recently posted. Plus, from this list we can garner that our readers are very interested in Epic. In fact, the top post about becoming a Certified Epic consultant has had 3 times as much traffic as the other posts. Whether you like how Epic handles their certification, a lot of people seem interested in obtaining the Epic certification.

I also want to take a moment to recognize the advertisers who support all the work we do at Hospital EMR and EHR. The content here wouldn’t exist if it wasn’t for their support. If you enjoy what we do, check out their products and see what they have to offer your hospital.

Canon – This company really needs no introduction. They have some great scanner products. I have one on my desk and I love it. Heavy duty scanners are a must in the hospital EHR environment. Paper is still coming into your office, and with an EHR you usually want that paper stored electronically instead of in the now extinct paper chart. Just make sure you get a quality scanner so you don’t burn through a cheap one like I did when I first implemented an EHR many years ago.

Caristix – Need an HL7 interface? Check out Caristix to get it done faster. It’s always great for a hospital to have someone to look to when they need an HL7 interface done quickly. HL7 is going to be the dominate interface standard for the forseeable future. If you don’t have a good strategy for managing all the HL7 interfaces you have and the ones you’ll have in the future, then talk to Caristix.

GE Centricity Business – With Healthcare Reform circling over head and PPACA (Patient Protection an Affordable Care Act) upon us, we’re getting ready for a sea of changes when it comes to managing your revenue. The future of healthcare revenue is going to require a revenue management software like the one that GE business offers. Plus, the beauty of revenue cycle management software is that the purchase can be directly tied to profitability of your organization.

Thanks to those advertisers. If you’re interested in supporting the work we do, check out more details on our Hospital EMR and EHR advertising page. We’ve also recently started some email blasts, content marketing, and whitepaper lead generation.

July 3, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

What If EMR Interoperability Was Mandatory?

For decades, industries have haggled and coded and bargained their way into shared data standards.  Each agreement has made great technical advances possible and grown markets into forms which could hardly have been imagined before.

Traditionally, the idea has been agreeing on interoperable standards is a form of enlightened self-interest.  The equasion “interoperability=larger markets=more pie for everyone” has nearly always managed to take root even in industries as brutally competitive as networking.  Consider where we’d be without 802.11 for WiFi, for example. If WiFi manufacturers had staged a prolonged battle over standards, and the reach of WiFi didn’t blossom everywhere, the Internet as we know it might not exist.

Well, here in EMR vendor land, we’ve somehow passed the exit marked “coopetition” and wandered off into interoperability nowhere land.  Sure, tell me about the CommonWell Alliance, which looks, on the surface, something like industry cooperation, and I’ll retort, “too little, too late.”  And do I even have to say that the idea that Epic supports everybody is something of a laughing matter?

Maybe, after seeing how miserably the EMR vendor industry has failed to come together to share data, it’s time to force the matter.  I read that ONC  honcho Farzad Mostashari has occasionally threatened to do just that, but hasn’t followed through with any proposed regs on the subject.

What if the FCC, the FDA and the ONC (which are now taking comments on a regulatory framework for health IT) decide to look at standards, pick a winner and shove it down the ever-living throat of every uncooperative vendor hoping to create dependency on their way of doing things?  That would include Epic, of course, which today, hears countless hospital CIOs say they had to buy their product because everybody else did.

Don’t get me wrong, this is a very, very serious matter; any regs that attempted to force interoperability would impose untold billions in costs on vendors, not to mention their customers. But if interoperability is the real prize we’re ultimately hoping to gain — the big EMR enchilada — is it possible that it’s time to take the risk anyway?  I don’t know, but I certainly wonder.  How about you, readers?

June 5, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies.

Judy Calls Epic “Most Open System I Know”

After Zina Moukheiber from Forbes was declined an interview with Judy Faulkner, CEO of Epic, last year Judy decided to talk to Zina about Epic in this article “An Interview With The Most Powerful Woman In Health Care.” Zina does a nice job on the interview and raises some of the questions many people have about Epic. It’s worth a read if you like to follow the hospital EHR world.

Many people are likely going to latch on to Zina calling Judy Faulkner the “most powerful woman in health care.” I don’t think that’s really up for discussion. Judy is the most powerful woman in healthcare and so I’m really glad that Judy is starting to join the discussion about Epic and healthcare. She has an important voice in the discussion and we need her participation. Although, I’m sure she’ll hate being called a billionaire in the article. The reality is we don’t know how much Judy’s really worth until we know how much Epic is worth and I’m not sure Epic plans to go public anytime soon.

Semantics aside, the most important part of the interview was the discussion of Epic being a closed system to which Judy frankly replied, “We are the most open system I know because we’re built as a database management system, and database management systems need to allow their users to mold it to what they need.” I think she really believes that Epic is an open system and quite frankly there aren’t that many in healthcare she can look to that are more open. Sure, a number of EHR vendors have worked to be more open, but even they aren’t as open as many other non health IT software systems. Maybe Judy hasn’t looked at the APIs outside of healthcare.

The real disconnect I had when reading Judy’s thoughts on being open is her lack of understanding of how a truly open API works. In a well implemented API, you can allow any and all programmers to be able to build applications on top of your software without those programmers needing to read your code and study your internal software. I’m not saying you don’t want and need to have an application and verification process for those people who want to tap into your API. This can be part of the process, but a well implemented and documented API can be open to everyone interested in building on top of your software. The value Epic would receive from so many companies iterating and extending the core Epic functionality would be amazing.

The other facet of Epic openness discussed in the article was around interoperability. Judy offered these comments on Epic’s ability to share patient records:

As of March 2013, our customers exchanged 760,000 patient records per month; about one-third were with non-Epic systems. Based on the historical trajectory, we expect that we’re closer to exchanging approximately one million records per month. We are currently exchanging data with Allscripts, Cerner, Department of Defense, Veteran Affairs Administration, Social Security Administration, eHealth Exchange (formerly Nationwide Health Information Network), Greenway, MEDITECH, NextGen and others. We expect to be exchanging data soon with eClinicalWorks, General Electric, Surescripts, and others.

This sounds good on face, but lets consider how many records Epic is sharing. Let’s use the round number of 1 million patient records shared per month. The article says that Epic has about half of the US population on Epic, or about 150 million patients. That means that about 0.67% of Epic’s patient records are being shared.

I’m happy to applaud Epic for sharing 1 million records a month with so many different vendors. My only complaint is that they could do so much more. For example, if you can share records between Epic and Cerner now, does that work for all Epic hospitals or do you have to do the new integration with every hospital that says they want to share records with Cerner? If it was a turn key way to integrate with Cerner, I’m quite sure that instead of 1% of Epic’s patient records being shared we’d see tens of millions of patient records flowing where they needed to go.

Many might remember my surprise breakfast with Judy Faulkner at the CHIME Forum. From my personal experience, Judy is not the black widow that I’ve heard many portray her to be. In fact, I found her incredibly thoughtful, caring, and really interested in quality patient care. That’s why I hope Judy will see that she’s sitting on an opportunity to do so much more than she’s doing now. Although, it will take a shift in her understanding of what it means to be an open EHR. Right now it seems her mostly unfounded fears won’t let her see the possibilities.

May 16, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

Epic Module Targets Patients For Care Coordination

At Gundersen Lutheran Health System, executives have put together a program to target the 1 to 2 percent of those most likely to be hospitalized, seen in the emergency department or face other complications. To manage the program, the La Crosse, Wis.-based system is leveraging a feature of their Epic EMR which sifts out the patients most in need of additional care coordination, reports Health Data Management.

Gundersen Lutheran is targeting complex patients with its program, but not just those with medically-complex conditions. They’re also hoping to find patients who, while they might have simpler conditions, live alone or have trouble following sometimes difficult medical care plans.  The system is using the EMR first to identify the patients, then to treat them, according to Health Data Management.

To find patients in need of extra care coordination services, Gundersen is using a “tiered scoring” module built in to the Epic platform which includes one component for medical complexity and another to measure psycho-social issues. When clinicians want to refer a patient to the care coordination program, physicians use the Epic scoring tool to see if  the patient qualifies. Clinicians can also notify the care coordination team using the Epic system, in three clicks or less, noted Beth Smith, R.N., executive director of patient and family-centered care at the health system.

The patients identified by the scoring model as in need of extra care coordination are farmed out to a group of 22 nurses and social workers, whose job it is to monitor the care of these complex patients who are more likely to face adverse events.

The workload the care coordinators face is intense.  Typically, care managers are supervising some 1,700 patients each, who not only stay in touch with patients but also attend office visits and follow through with specialists.  Epic plays a role here too, however.  Care coordinators get a special tab in the Epic EMR which pulls key elements of the patient’s history into a single view,  making it easier to get a sense of the whole patient.  Epic also notifies them via a message in the system if a patient shows up in the ED.

According to Health Data Management, this program has helped stabilize hypertensive and diabetic patients, with just under half showing sustained improvements over a two-year period.

May 15, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies.

Cleveland Clinic Brings Epic Smarts To NY Hospital Practices

The Cleveland Clinic is going the consulting route, this time around by working with the physician and specialty practices for a New York hospital to bring Epic up to speed.

Glens Falls is a 410-bed nonprofit which began implementing the Epic EMR in early 2012. The New York facility has 3,000 employees and 28 regional locations.

Apparently dissatisfied with its internal knowledge base on the subject, It’s now contracted with the Clinic’s MyPractice Healthcare Solutions (MPHS) to help deploy and optimize its rollout, reports the Cleveland Plain Dealer.

Among the Epic products installed at Glens Falls is “MyChart,” offering a clinical and billing records portal for patients, according to the Plain Dealer.

The Cleveland Clinic has had Epic in place for more than 10 years, making it one of the first healthcare systems in the country to install the vendor’s product. Having learned from that experience, Cleveland Clinic MPHS now brings project management and implementation expertise to other facilities.

I think this is an interesting business model for the Cleveland Clinic, and I’d be curious to see what other consulting agreements it has put into place. (So far I wasn’t able to turn up any others but my guess is that they exist.)

It seems to me that hospitals who have tamed Epic — Kaiser Permanente comes to mind — might very well go into this line of business, as the need is great. Not to mention that if I were making a decision as to who I’d hire to wire my medical practice into my hospital, a successful institution would have a very strong pitch to make.

Can any of you readers share other examples of hospitals/clinics who are turning their Epic experience into a consulting revenue stream?

May 13, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies.