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Big Data, Predictive Analytics Priorities For Healthcare Organizations

Leveraging big data and healthcare analytics are key initiatives for C-suite healthcare executives, but barriers to making progress still remain, according to an item in iHealthBeat.

According to a survey by the eHealth Initiative and the College of Health Information Management Executives, about 80 percent of CIOs and other C-suite healthcare executives see big data and predictive analytics use as important goals for their organizations, iHealthBeat reports.

But it won’t come easy. In fact, 84 percent of respondents said that implementing these strategies and tools are a challenge for their organization. And only 45 percent said they had a plan in place to manage the growing volume of electronic data.

The survey, which questioned 102 executives in May and June, found that 90 percent of respondents used analytics for quality improvement, 90 percent used analytics for revenue cycle management, and 66 percent used analytics for fraud prevention. Also, 82 percent of survey respondents said that population health management is important to their analytic strategy.

Meanwhile, 82 percent of those responding said that health information exchange is important, according to iHealthBeat.

As for data sources, administrative- and claims-based data were most used, at 77 percent and 75 percent respectively. Eighteen percent of respondents’ staff were trained to handle the data, and 16 percent used third-party organizations to overcome staff shortages for data analysis.

Despite execs’ enthusiasm for big data/predictive analytics use, however, significant obstacles remain to rolling out such programs, iHealthBeat reports.  According to a separate CIC Advisory survey, budget strain and lack of needed skills is delaying the use of analytics at many healthcare organizations.

According to that survey, building an enterprise analytics system is held back by the difficulty of integrating different analytic systems. Moreover, most organizations don’t have a dedicated analytics or business intelligence team, and many rely on outside analytics consultants.

All of that being said, it seems guaranteed that hospitals and other healthcare organizations will eventually find a way to leverage big data. Healthcare organizations expect to keep ramping up their spending on data discovery and predictive analytics in coming months and years, research suggests.

In the mean time, however, there’s a ton of work to do, staff to be hired and trained and integration to be done. It’s going to be an uphill battle.

August 16, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies.

Expanding HIEs Taking Role As Backbone For Reform Efforts

It looks like we may be seeing a tipping point for HIEs, which for many years have seen only isolated successes. According to a new report from the eHealth Initiative, the number of HIEs has grown meaningfully between last year and this year, and this year should see many new HIE organizations form.  Perhaps more importantly, it looks like HIEs are taking their place as the backbone for up and coming reform efforts.

When eHI reached out to survey HIEs, it found 322 organizations to survey, up from 255 last year.  Of that group, 88 HIE initiatives are at the highest stages of development on eHIs HIE development scale, an increase of 13 from last year.  As researchers see it, we’ll see even more growth and maturing technologies in 2013.

Over the last several years, the HIEs which have stayed on their feet and matured have almost all been propped up by federal dollars. Twenty-seven of the advanced HIEs surveyed said that the single most substantial source of funding they had was from the federal government; also, 22 of these HIEs were classified as state designated entities.

Unlike the past, however, it seems that HIEs believe they can survive without grant money from the government.  Of 39 state-designated entities responding to the study, 37 said they believe it is ‘very likely’ or ‘likely’ that they will remain operational after the HITECH dollars stop flowing.  An additional 31 of the SDEs said t hat it is ‘very likely’ or ‘likely’ that they will be financially sustainable three years from now even without additional federal dollars.

Now, here’s where it gets really interesting (to me at least). As part of the study, the eHealth Initiative asked some questions about how HIEs were playing into preparations for the full rolllout of health reform.

What they found out is that HIEs are increasingly playing a major role in health reform-related efforts such as ACOs and/or Patient-Centered Medical Homes.  More than half (109) of the HIE respondents said that they are supporting ACOs or PCMHs.

The HIEs aren’t just dumb pipes either;  not only are they offering technical infrastructure, they’re providing data analytics services around cost efficiencies and quality improvement.

Looks like 2013 should be a pivotal year for HIEs. I for one am excited to see what HIE organizations will be able to accomplish over the next 12 months prior to full rollout of health reform.  Go team HIE!

December 3, 2012 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies.