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Do Hospital CIOs Have the IT They Need?

Posted on February 27, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

While at a CIO reception at the HIMSS-CHIME Forum, I took part in an interesting conversation with a group of CIOs. They were talking about the number of phone calls they get from vendors. They had some unique insights and approaches into how they handled all the incoming messaging from vendors. I’ll save most of those insights for the Healthcare IT Marketing and PR conference that I host, but he also offered this interesting nugget when he said the following:

Our organization more or less has what we need to be successful. We aren’t looking to add more.

He did later acknowledge that if that wasn’t true, that they would go out and search for the vendors as opposed to an incoming call from a sales person.

This CIO’s comment struck me. I don’t think he was being so arrogant as to say that they weren’t going to purchase any more IT solutions. However, I think he was saying that he didn’t see any major enterprise purchases on his horizon.

On the one hand, I think that’s a sign of a maturing of the industry. His hospital organization finally had the IT tools they needed to be successful. That’s a good thing since I think if we’d had the conversation 3-5 years ago it would have been very different.

On the other hand, it’s kind of scary to think that this hospital CIO isn’t really looking at the IT environment around him and looking for new tools and solutions that could make his organization even better. This is a simple illustration of how every IT organization can get in a rut and stop innovating if we’re not careful.

At some point in any IT implementation, you have to step back and double down on the investments you’ve already made. There are huge opportunities in every healthcare organization I’ve seen to maximize the benefits they’re receiving from the IT they’ve already implemented. It’s fair to say that this CIO was at that stage of the game. It was time to stop searching and implementing other systems and time to optimize what’s already in place. That’s a good thing as long as it’s not taken too far.

I think the hospital health IT industry is largely in the same place as this CIO. Most aren’t looking to make new purchases. Instead, they want to extract value out of their previous purchases. What do you think? Have you seen this same sort of market maturity? Any idea on what will be next that will change this CIO and the industry’s thinking?

Suggestions and Tips for Hospital IT Professionals at #HIMSS17

Posted on February 8, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Hard to believe that the 2017 HIMSS Annual Conference is less than a week and a half away. For someone who eats, breathes, and sleeps Health IT, HIMSS is like winning the golden ticket to visit Willy Wonka’s chocolate factory. However, for a lot of hospital IT professionals, it might be their first time attending HIMSS and it can be quite overwhelming. 40,000-50,000 attendees and approximately 1300 exhibitors should be overwhelming.

While I’m certainly not a HIMSS veteran like many people, I’ve learned a number of important tips and tricks that will help you get the most out of HIMSS. Hopefully some of these will help you have a better HIMSS experience.

Standard Conference Answers – Instead of listing these individually, I’ll list them all in one since they’re true for any conference and their reasons should be now apparent. Wear comfortable shoes. Drink lots of water. Plan for good meals. Bring a battery pack or charge whenever possible. Expect bad internet. Have fun.

CHIME-HIMSS CIO Forum – As a hospital IT professional, the CHIME-HIMSS CIO Forum on Saturday and Sunday before HIMSS is excellent. They put together a great program of speakers, but more importantly you get the chance to network with 1000 or so of people like you. Don’t miss it if you come from the hospital IT world.

People – This one is obvious once you think about it, but is often missed by attendees. The people you hang out with at a conference will make all the difference. If you hang out with smart, well connected people, you’ll meet a bunch of other smart, well connected people and you’ll have a great experience. If you feel you don’t know anyone good to hang out with, hit social media and start interacting with people you find interesting. Friendships will develop quickly if you put in a little effort. Who you spend time with can transform your HIMSS experience for good or bad.

Plan for Serendipity – Everyone likes to suggest that the key to HIMSS is to have a plan. Considering the volume of sessions and exhibitors, a plan is good. However, don’t forget to plan in time for serendipitous interactions. Maybe that’s putting a party on your schedule that will broaden your horizon. Maybe that’s putting some down time on your schedule to sit at a table and connect with some random strangers. Maybe that’s some time trolling the exhibit hall to meet new people and companies that will provide you new perspectives. My favorite experience at HIMSS16 was a random dinner that came together after meeting someone at an impromptu meetup.

Don’t Be a Wallflower, Engage with Others – It’s easy to go to a conference and spend your entire time listening to sessions and exhibitor presentations and pitches. While this is valuable, you’ll have a deeper, more engaging experience at HIMSS17 if you engage with the people around you. Yes, I’m suggesting you go beyond just the usual casual platitudes of where you work and where you’re from. If this scares you or you don’t know how to get started, join us at a #HIMSS17 meetup where everyone is there to do just that. Education is valuable, but engagement is priceless.

Those are a few of my tips for #HIMSS17. What tips would you add to the list?

What’s the Role of a Hospital CIO in Business Model Transformation?

Posted on December 23, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I don’t think anyone would argue that the healthcare business model is changing. There are a number of dynamics at play that are requiring every healthcare organization to evaluate what their business will look like in the future. Some examples of these changes include:

  • Patients with High Deductible Plans
  • Accountable Care Organizations
  • Other Risk Based Care Models
  • Value Based Reimbursement
  • Telemedicine
  • Chatbots and AI Assistants
  • Health Sensors
  • Retail Clinics

I could go on and on, but I think that highlights some of the major ones. What’s interesting about these trends is that it requires a change in business model. However, pretty much every one of these changes in business models requires the use of technology to facilitate the change. Some of them are impossible to do without technology.

If technology is going to play an important role in healthcare’s business transformation, what role should the hospital CIO play in the organization?

What’s shocking to me is how many CIOs don’t want any part in the business transformation part of healthcare. At CHIME I heard one CIO say, “We don’t want anything to do with MACRA. We just want to supply them the systems and let them figure it out.” I’m not sure the “them” he was referring to, but I think this approach is a big mistake. We’re all in this together and have to act as a team to get it done in the most efficient and effective way possible.

I was impressed by another hospital CIO who said basically the opposite. She said, “Oh no, we’re going to be in charge of MACRA and MIPS. I don’t want them taking over MACRA and MIPS, because if they’re in charge of it they’ll select a bunch of items for which we’re not capable of doing.”

Once again, this points to the need for collaboration to occur. You need the clinical insight together with the technical and software based insight in order to make the best decisions possible.

More importantly is I think it’s a big mistake for the hospital CIO to not be part of the business transformation. If the hospital CIO doesn’t take part in business transformation, then IT essentially becomes a commodity. The worst thing you can be in an organization is a commodity. When you’re a commodity they squeeze the budget out of you and you’re seen as non-essential or non-critical to an organization. What CIO wants to be in that type of organization?

I do see most progressive healthcare IT leaders outsourcing much of the “commodity IT” to other third party providers so they can focus their efforts on becoming a more essential part of their organization’s business transformation. The problem is that this requires a different set of skills and interests than what was essentially an operational role managing servers, desktop, and the network.

What type of CIO are you? What type of CIO does your organization need or want?

We’re Great at Creating Policies and Procedures, but Awful At Removing Them

Posted on December 21, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Ever since I heard Tony Scott, the US CIO, talk about his goal of taking stuff off the federal books, I’ve been chewing on that concept. There’s little doubt that the federal government is really great at creating laws and regulations, but they’re really poor at getting rid of old laws and regulations. It’s hard to blame them. I don’t really know anyone that enjoys what amounts to “spring cleaning.” Needless to say, the US government could certainly be part of an episode (or even multiple seasons) of Hoarders the way they keep laws and regulations sitting around gathering dust.

While it’s easy to slam the government for their hoarding tendencies, I don’t think healthcare is immune to this problem either. Sometimes we’re required to “hoard” patient medical records by law. That’s not a bad thing since it’s good to comply with the law. However, it is a bad thing when we no longer are required to retain the data and the data in this old data has limited value.

In fact, much of that old outdated data could pose a risk to patients. We all know that many of our first IT systems were implemented quickly and therefore resulted in poorly collected data. Keeping around incorrect data can lead to disastrous consequences. It might be time for some spring cleaning (yes, it can be done in Winter too).

What’s more troublesome than this is many of the policies and procedures that exist in most hospital systems. Much like the government these policies and procedures get put in place, but we rarely go back and take them off the books. My least favorite thing to hear in a hospital when I ask why they do something a certain way is “We’ve always done it this way.”

If we don’t know why we’re doing something, that’s the perfect opportunity to ask the question and figure out the answer. Many times there is a good answer and a good reason for the policy and procedure. However, more often than most people realize, we’re just doing something because we’ve always done it that way and not because it’s the best way to do something.

I love Tony Scott’s effort to purge things from the books that are outdated, useless, or even harmful. Every hospital organization I’ve seen could benefit from this approach as well. Their organization would benefit, their employees would benefit, and ultimately patients would benefit as well.

When was the last time you got rid of a policy or procedure?

Healthcare Security is Scaring Hospital CIOs

Posted on November 16, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is sponsored by Samsung Business. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

Coming out of the CHIME CIO Forum, I had a chance to mix and mingle with hundreds of hospital CIOs. There was one major theme at the conference: security. If you asked these hospital CIOs what was keeping them up at night, I’m sure that almost every one of them would say security. They see it as a major challenge and the job is never done.

I had more than one CIO tell me that breaches of their healthcare system are going to happen. That’s why it’s extremely important to have a 2 prong security strategy in healthcare that includes both creating security barriers and also a mitigation and response strategy.

One of the most challenging pieces of security identified by these healthcare CIOs was the proliferation of endpoints. That includes the proliferation of devices including mobile devices and the increase in the number of users using these technologies. There was far less concern about the mobile devices since there are some really deeply embedded software and hardware security built into mobile devices like Samsung’s Knox which has made mobile device security a lot easier to implement. The same can’t be said for the number of people using these devices. One hospital CIO described it as 21,000 points of vulnerability when he talked about the 21,000 people who worked at his organization. Sadly, there’s no one software solution to prevent human error.

This is why we see so much investment in security awareness programs and breach detection. Your own staff are often your biggest vulnerability. Training them is a good start and can prevent some disasters, but the malware has gotten so sophisticated that it’s really impossible to completely stop. That’s why you need great software that can detect when a breach has occurred so you can deal with it quickly.

On the one hand, it’s one of the most exciting times to be in healthcare IT. We have so much more data available to us that we can use to improve care. However, with all that data and technology comes an increased need to make sure that data and technology is kept secure. The good news is that many hospital boards have woken up to this fact and are finally funding security efforts as a priority for their organization. Is your organization prepared?

For more content like this, follow Samsung on Insights, Twitter, LinkedIn , YouTube and SlideShare.

Hospital CIOs Say Better Data Security Is Key Goal

Posted on November 9, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

A new study has concluded that while they obviously have other goals, an overwhelming majority of healthcare CIOs see data protection as their key objective for the near future. The study, which was sponsored by Spok and administered by CHIME, more than 100 IT leaders were polled on their perspective on communications and healthcare.

In addition to underscoring the importance of data security efforts, the study also highlighted the extent to which CIOs are being asked to add new functions and wear new hats (notably patient satisfaction management).

Goals and investments
When asked what business goals they expected to be focused on for the next 18 months, the top goal of 12 possible options was “strengthening data security,” which was chosen by 81%. “Increasing patient satisfaction” followed relatively closely at 70%, and “improving physician satisfaction” was selected by 65% of respondents.

When asked which factors were most important in making investments in communications-related technologies for their hospital, the top factor of 11 possible options was “best meets clinician/organizational needs” with 82% selecting that choice, followed by “ease of use for end users (e.g. physician/nurse) at 80% and “ability to integrate with current systems (e.g. EHR) at 75%.

When it came to worfklows they hoped to support with better tools, “care coordination for treatment planning” was the clear leader, chosen by 67% of respondents, followed by patient discharge (48%), “patient handoffs within hospital” (46%) and “patient handoffs between health services and facilities” chosen by 40% of respondents selected.

Mobile developments
Turning to mobile, Spok asked healthcare CIOs which of nine technology use cases were driving the selection and deployment of mobile apps. The top choices, by far, were “secure messaging in communications among care team” at 84% and “EHR access/integrations” with 83%.

A significant number of respondents (68%) said they were currently in the process of rolling out a secure texting solution. Respondents said their biggest challenges in doing so were “physician adoption/stakeholder buy-in” at 60% and “technical setup and provisioning” at 40%. A substantial majority (78%) said they’d judge the success of their rollout by the rate the solution was adopted by by physicians.

Finally, when Spok asked the CIOs to take a look at the future and predict which issues will be most important to them three years from now, the top-rated choice was “patient centered care,” which was chosen by 29% of respondents,” “EHR integrations” and “business intelligence.”

A couple of surprises
While much of this is predictable, I was surprised by a couple things.

First, the study doesn’t seem to have been designed for statistical significance, it’s still worth noting that so many CIOs said improving patient satisfaction was one of their top three goals for the next 18 months. I’m not sure what they can do to achieve this end, but clearly they’re trying. (Exactly what steps they should take is a subject for another article.)

Also, I didn’t expect to see so many CIOs engaged in rolling out secure texting, partly because I would’ve expected such rollouts to already have been in place at this point, and partly because I assume that more CIOs would be more focused on higher-level mobile apps (such as EHR interfaces). I guess that while mobile clinical integration efforts are maturing, many healthcare facilities aren’t ready to take them on yet.

HIMSS Puts Optimistic Spin On EMR Value Data

Posted on February 5, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

After several years of EMR deployment, one would think that the EMR value proposition had been pretty well established. But the truth is, the financial and clinical return on EMRs still seems to be in question, at least where some aspects of their functioning are concerned.

That, at least, is what I took from the recent HIMSS “Value of Health IT Survey”  released earlier this month. After all, you don’t see Ford releasing a “Value of Cars Survey,” because the value of a car has been pretty much understood since the first ones rolled off of the assembly line more than a century ago.

Industry-wide, the evidence for the value of EMRs is still mixed. At minimum, the value proposition for EMRs is a remarkably tough case to make considering how many billions have been spent on buying, implementing and maintaining them. It’s little surprise that in a recent survey of CHIME members, 71% of respondents said that their top priority for the next 12 months was to realize more value from their EMR investment. That certainly implies that they’re not happy with their EMR’s value prop as it exists.

So, on to the HIMSS survey. To do the research, HIMSS reached out to 52 executives, drawn exclusively from either HIMSS Analytics EMRAM Stage 6 or 7, or Davies Award winning hospitals. In other words, these respondents represent the creme de la creme of EMR implementors, at least as HIMSS measures such things.

HIMSS researchers measured HIT value perceptions among this elite group by sorting responses into one of five areas: Satisfaction, Treatment/Clinical, Electronic Information/Data, Patient Engagement and Population Management and Savings.

HIMSS’ topline conclusion — its success metric, if you will — is that 88 percent of execs reported at least one positive outcome from their EMR. The biggest area of success was in the Treatment/Clinical area, with quality performance of the clinical staff being cited by 83% of respondents. Another area that scored high was savings, with 81% reporting that they’d seen some benefits, primarily in coding accuracy, days in accounts receivable and transcription costs.

On the other end of the scale, execs had to admit that few of their clinical staffers are satisfied with their EMRs. Only 29% of execs said that their EMR had increased physician satisfaction, and less than half (44%) said their nurses were more satisfied. If that isn’t a red flag I don’t know what is.

Admittedly, there are positive results here, but you have to consider the broader context for this study. We’re talking about a piece of software that cost organizations tens or even hundreds of millions of dollars, upon which many of their current and future plans rest. If I told you that my new car’s engine worked and the wheels turned, but that the brakes were dodgy, fuel economy abysmal and the suspension bumpy, wouldn’t you wonder whether I should have bought it in the first place?

Patient Identification and Patient Matching – A Million Dollar Challenge

Posted on January 22, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

UPDATE: For those who missed the live discussion, you can watch the recording of our patient identification and patient matching interview in the YouTube video below:

Patient Identification and Patient Matching - A Million Dollar Challenge-blog

Given the recent announcement by CHIME about the $1 Million Patient Matching and Identification competition, I thought it would be the perfect time to explore the challenges of patient identification and matching in healthcare. On Monday January 25, 2016 at 10:30 AM ET (7:30 AM PT), I’ll be sitting down with 2 great experts on patient identification and matching:

The great part is that you can join our conversation live and even add your own comments to the discussion. All you need to do to watch live is visit this blog post on Monday January 25, 2016 at 10:30 AM ET (7:30 AM PT) and watch the video embed at the bottom of the post. You can also subscribe to the blab directly. We’ll be doing a more formal interview for the first 30 minutes and then open up the Blab to others who want to add to the conversation or ask us questions. The conversation will be recorded as well and available on this post after the interview.

I’m excited to talk with Beth and Michael about the impact of poor patient matching on healthcare, the current solutions to the problem, and their thoughts and views on CHIME’s $1 million National Patient ID Challenge. We hope you’ll join us on Monday and share your expertise and questions!

If you’d like to see the archives of Healthcare Scene’s past interviews, you can find and subscribe to all of Healthcare Scene’s interviews on YouTube.

Two Hidden Gems at the HIMSS15 Annual Conference

Posted on March 20, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’m deep in my preparations for the HIMSS Annual Conference in Chicago. It’s amazing how quickly the schedule fills up. It has me really excited to meet with so many amazing people. To all the PR people who have sent me pitches, I’ll be getting back to you shortly. Yes, I do respond to each and every one of you. No, sending another request won’t get a response faster. In fact, it will make the response slower.

My own schedule aside, I was thinking today that there are two gems at HIMSS that many people don’t know about. So, I thought I’d share them with you.

The CIO Forum
This event is put together by CHIME and is a shorter version of the CHIME Fall CIO Forum. You can check out the schedule of events here. CHIME always does a great job bringing together some great speakers from the industry and also some to address topics like leadership.

While the content is great, the best part of the event is being surrounded by CIOs. Everywhere you turn is another hospital CIO. It makes for a tremendous opportunity to connect and learn from hospital CIOs. The event does cost extra, so make sure you get the right pass if you want to attend. If you’re there, come say hi.

New Media Meetup
I’m a little bias on this event since it’s the one I host, but it’s always my favorite part of HIMSS. There’s a special energy at the event that comes from all of the amazing people in New Media that are at HIMSS. Everywhere you turn at the event you run into someone else that you’ve likely interacted with on Twitter or some other social media.

The event has evolved over time. Originally it brought together bloggers, but quickly expanded to anyone involved in social media. You can find all the details for the event here. I hope that some readers can make it. If you do, be sure to come take a selfie with me or something.

Those are a few of my favorite events at HIMSS that many people don’t know about. What are your favorite parts of HIMSS?

Marc Probst Takes Aim at Meaningful Use in Interview at CHIME

Posted on November 6, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of the must read interviews coming out of the CHIME Fall Forum is Mark Hagland’s interview with Marc Probst. We know that Marc Probst had a growing dissatisfaction with meaningful use after he said he would love to kill meaningful use during National Health IT Week. He keeps on that same trajectory during this great interview by Mark. Although, I think Marc is just representing the feelings of many hospital CIOs.

Here are a few excerpts of the interview for those who don’t want to read the whole thing:

So what is meaningful use for you, as an IT pioneer?

Well, it’s a pain in the neck! We believe we were already some of the most meaningful users, in the broader sense of the term, in healthcare IT, prior to the meaningful use program. But meaningful use has imposed rigid functions that you have to do, and I don’t think it’s added any additional value to what our clinicians do, but only to add tasks. So it hasn’t been all that helpful. I sit on the [federal] IT Policy Committee, so I have a little to do with meaningful use, but nonetheless, it hasn’t been [satisfying].

Nice to see that Marc Probst is taking a little bit of accountability for meaningful use. Although, if you’ve ever sat on a committee you know that you can only do so much if the committee is against you. I think the thoughts above are the opinions of many in healthcare. Although, this simple quote from Marc Probst sums up what many would like to see done:

“I honestly think we should now declare victory and move on.”

Although, Marc Probst also offers this sobering reality that many healthcare CIOs will face:

But I think that a fair number are going to say, look, if I haven’t done it this year, I’ll get the penalties anyway if I haven’t yet attested to Stage 2. I think many will focus instead on ICD-10 and data security, because meaningful use is so frustrating and they don’t control the variables; and security, they can control some of the variables. And the penalties are much harsher for breaches than for meaningful use failure.

I’ve never seen someone compare the meaningful use penalties with the penalties for breaches. It’s a very interesting comparison. However, they are hard to compare since the meaningful use penalties are guaranteed to happen if you don’t attest to MU. The breach penalties only happen if you have a breach occur…or I should say if you have a breach occur and you realize it happened (or get caught). That’s likely why more people are concerned with the meaningful use penalties than security and privacy in their organization.

I think this type of sentiment about meaningful use will grow stronger and be heard from more areas of the country. Marc Probst and Intermountain are really powerful figures in the healthcare community. No doubt, Marc’s decision to speak out on this subject will embolden many others to do the same.

Go and read the rest of Mark Hagland’s interview with Marc Probst. Many more good perspectives in the full interview. I’m glad that people like Marc agree with me that we should Blow Up Meaningful Use and focus on interoperability.