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Planning for EHR Consultants in an EHR Go Live

Posted on December 13, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

At CHIME 2012 I asked David Tucker, MBA, MHA, FCHIME, VP of National Sales at ESD and Kelly Mulligan, RN, BA, Chief Operating Officer at ESD about how a hospital CIO should plan for an EHR consultant. While we’d love to think that a hospital could just ask for an EHR consultant and have one there the next day, the reality is much different. Sure, you could have an EHR consultant there the next day, but if you want the best EHR consultants it takes some forethought and planning to make sure you get on their schedule. David Tucker, former hospital CIO, talks more about planning for EHR consultants in the video below.

Why Don’t We Groom the Next Generation of Health IT Leaders?

Posted on November 21, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.


What’s really interesting about my tweet above is that the person that asked me why their weren’t young people at CHIME was actually the wife of someone attending CHIME. She was a healthcare IT outsider that was just observing the situation from the outside.

It’s a very good question and all that I could tell this nice lady was, I don’t know. The reality is that CHIME and all the other major health IT conferences should be embracing and facilitating the next generation of health IT leaders. If they don’t then healthcare will be in a bad position. The next generation of hospital CIOs need to learn from the current crop of hospital CIOs.

I know that I ruffled some feathers with my previous post about the “Old Boys Club” of Healthcare IT, but this is another example of it. I was amazed that I was the youngest person at CHIME and by a long shot. The only people that came close in age were some of the vendors participating in the event.

What are we doing in healthcare IT to groom the next generation of leaders? From my view, not very much. It’s unfortunate, because your hospital CIO won’t live forever (as hard as he may try).

The Cloud and Hospitals

Posted on November 1, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Let’s talk about The Cloud and Hospitals for a minute. At a session I attended at CHIME a hospital CIO said, “There’s still a lot of unknown with cloud.”

At first I was a little taken back by the comment. As an IT guy, it seems like cloud has been around forever. Plus, I would bet that every single hospital has a number of cloud based IT systems in their IT environment.

What then could be the unknown issues with the cloud that this CIO was talking about?

I found this really great resource on the IBM website about the cloud and healthcare. They hit on what is probably the biggest unknown with the cloud, HIPAA. Here’s a section which describes why it’s such an unknown.

Cloud providers hold a unique position as BAs entrusted with EPHI. When HIPAA was enacted, the concept of “the cloud” didn’t exist and probably could not have been predicted. Covered entities and other BAs are increasingly choosing to store health information in the cloud.

Then he adds in these cloud challenges:

Transferring data to the cloud comes with unique issues that complicate HIPAA compliance for covered entities, traditional BAs, and now cloud providers themselves. They include issues of control, access, availability, shared multitenant environments, incident preparedness and response, and data protection

All of these should provide any hospital CIO a moment of pause. As another hospital CIO I talked with said, “we’re still doing the cloud, but we are careful about who we work with in the cloud and how we do it.”

I think this will be the reality for the forseeable future. It takes a really well done trusted relationship for a hospital to trust a cloud provider. In the small ambulatory practice space it’s very different since there’s little doubt that the cloud provider can do much better than your neighborhood tech guy. However, this is not the case in hospitals where the decision to use the cloud or your existing in house IT staff and resources is much more complex.

The reality is that every hospital is likely going to have a mixed hosting strategy with some software hosted in house and some software hosted in the cloud. This means that every hospital CIO is going to have to figure out the cloud even if there’s still some difficult to answer questions.

My Surprise Breakfast with Epic CEO Judy Faulkner

Posted on October 29, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of the highlights of my experience at CHIME 2012 was a surprise breakfast that happened on the final day of CHIME. I actually was a touch late to breakfast after skipping out of a mostly empty room talking about HIPAA (imagine that on the last day of a conference). I got my breakfast and sat down at a table of what turned out to be mostly hospital CIOs.

Meals at CHIME turned out to be a great time to meet, connect and learn from the hospital CIOs that attended. A lively conversation was happening when a lady sat down next to me. I looked up and to my surprise the lady sitting next to me was none other than Judy Faulkner, CEO of Epic. I’m sure she had no idea who I was and I later realized that she likely sat next to me because on the other side of her was a hospital CIO she wanted to apologize to for something that had happened months before.

As an EHR blogger, I admit that I was probably a bit star struck sitting next to Judy. This was probably accentuated by the stigma (right or wrong) that Epic doesn’t like the media very much. So, I decided that rather than probe into Judy like a normal media person (I prefer to be a thought leader as much as I am a journalist anyway), I decided to just sit back and mostly listen.

It made for a really interesting experience since one of the first things Judy talked about was apologizing to this hospital CIO. I’m sure the cynics out there would say that she was probably apologizing because she wanted to further Epic’s business with that CIO. However, that wasn’t the impression I got from Judy. Instead, I got the impression that she had a real feeling of guilt that something she had done had caused other people some amount of trouble. In fact, how troubled she was by something most of us wouldn’t think twice about I think says something about Judy. I think some like to characterize her as a tough, driven, hard-nosed, business woman. Maybe she is in the boardroom, but my experience at breakfast was of her as a very thoughtful caring person.

When I told some of my colleagues about my experience with Judy, she told me I’d been seduced. Maybe she’s right. From my experience I saw a very kind, compassionate Judy.

I’ll wait to share all of the things I learned from my time with Judy for another time, but I did also have an interesting conversation with Judy about Twitter and social media. I think the conversation began because I playfully suggested that she should post whatever we were talking about to Twitter. I say playfully, because I was quite sure I’d never seen Judy on Twitter or any other social media and so I was interested to see her response. She responded something like, “I hope I live my whole life and never go on Twitter.”

While I was partially taken back by the sharpness of her response (Although, thinking back I shouldn’t have been surprised), I replied that “Twitter’s not about ‘what I ate today’ and that there was real value to engaging on Twitter.” To Judy’s credit, she then asked why I thought she should be on Twitter.

My response in the moment was pretty terrible. I told her about Twitter’s ability to “connect people.” While this is valuable to many people, the last thing that Judy wants in her position is more random people connecting with her. After giving such a lackluster response, I decided a broader answer I could have given would be, “Social media is about people and people are the most valuable asset in the world. Social media leverages people in amazingly powerful ways.”

That answer is still not perfect without examples and application, but at least the answer applies more broadly in a way that she could benefit from social media. After this experience, I asked myself if I was doing a keynote on healthcare social media, what would I say?

I’ve already come up with 21 ways to benefit from social media. I’ve also started creating a list of very specific examples of social media in healthcare. If you have more examples, I’d love to hear them in the comments. It only seems fitting that I’d use social media to help me put together this resource, right?

I’m still debating the best way to spread what I gather about healthcare social media, but I think it needs to happen. I still run into far too many people that think that social media is just about what you ate for lunch or your drunken pictures with friends. More people need to be informed about the amazing possibilities with healthcare social media. Plus, next time I happen upon breakfast with Judy Faulkner, I’ll have a much better answer for her.

What differentiates EHR Consulting Companies?

Posted on October 24, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

While at CHIME 2012, I had the chance to sit down with David Tucker, MBA, MHA, FCHIME, VP of National Sales at ESD and Kelly Mulligan, RN, BA, Chief Operating Officer at ESD. I learned a lot from them about what’s happening with hospital CIOs. Plus, it was great to get some first hand perspective on the EHR industry from a former hospital CIO (David Tucker) and an RN (Kelly Mulligan).

I pulled out a video camera to capture some of the things we talked about. I’ll be posting a number of videos with them over the next few weeks, but I’ll start with their answer to the question: What differentiates EHR consulting companies? They mention the KLAS EHR consulting form ratings and even talk about hospital CIO’s being burned by EHR consulting companies in the past.


What Differentiates EHR Consulting Companies Video

Call Me Maybe at #CHIME12

Posted on October 22, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As I’ve mentioned, it was my first time attending CHIME and it was exactly what I expected it to be. A great place to connect with Hospital CIOs and the leaders in the healthcare IT space. At the final reception, CHIME put together a video of many of the people involved in CHIME in a great Call Me Maybe video:

Attending CHIME 2012 Fall CIO Forum

Posted on October 17, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today I arrived at the 2012 Fall CIO Forum for CHIME. I’ve wanted to go to this event for quite a while. My fellow blogger, Neil Versel, had often told me about how great the event was and so I wanted to see it first hand.

Tonight I heard an almost emotional Farzad Mostashari speak and then got to mingle with all of the CIO’s at the evening event. A few things I’ve already noticed that I found interesting.

First, Farzad has really refined his pitch for healthcare IT. He makes a really compelling case for what’s possible and a really common sense analysis of why we need to start using healthcare IT now. If I were to put a title on Farzad’s talk at CHIME, I’d call it, “Stop with the Excuses, We Can Do Better.”

Everything at the event is high class. You can tell that no expense was spared to make sure that the major healthcare IT contributors are treated well.

I wasn’t that surprised, but it’s unfortunate that I was by far the youngest person at the conference (at least from what I saw). One wife of a CIO I talked with asked why there weren’t more young people present. Then she said, “Don’t these hospital CIOs want to groom the next generation of leaders? Why are they holding on so tightly and not preparing for the future.” It’s a good question I wasn’t really sure how to answer.

There are a lot of really powerful people at the event. It was fun to see Judy Faulkner mingling with people. I saw John Glaser. In many ways, it’s a Who’s Who of hospital health IT.

While there are many Hospital CIOs at the event, there are also a lot of vendor representatives. Not surprising considering the amount of budget these hospital CIOs control.

I was amazed at how many people were “old friends.” You could see that many of those attending have been doing so for years and this was their annual visit with colleagues. As a first time attendee, you’d think that I might not feel very welcome, but the opposite was the case. All of the hospital CIOs I met were very friendly, kind and happy to engage.

More on the event tomorrow. If you’re in Palm Springs at the event, I’d love to talk with you. Just leave a comment below or send me a tweet.