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Study: EMR ROI Stronger In Low-Income Setting

Well,  here’s some information which caught my eye right away. According to a new study published recently in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, EMRs can provide a good return on investment for hospitals located in low-income areas.

In the study, researchers studied the what happened when a tertiary hospital in Malawi implemented an enterprise- wide EMR system.  The felt it was important to evaluate an EMR implementation in a low-income area such as this, the authors noted, because such hospitals face obstacles unlike those in more prosperous areas, such as marked supply and staff shortages, which might change the effect of such a system.

To examine the impact of the EMR, researchers looked at three areas: length of stay at the facility, transcription times and lab use.  The hospital saved an estimated $284,395 per year in U.S. dollars. By the third year of operation, the EMR  started generating a positive ROI, and by five years, it provided net benefit of $613,681, according to FierceEMR.

This is an inspiring study for those who hope to see EMR success stories, as until recently, there’s been little if any information to suggest that EMRs can offer a substantial savings on operations, much less help to generate a profit.

This doesn’t necessarily mean that hospitals aren’t generating savings or even profits by implementing an EMR.  As we noted in a previous story, few hospitals are planning for and implementing EMR ROI measures early in the game, according to a recent study from Beacon Partners.

If hospitals don’t dig in and integrate EMR ROI measurements into their strategic planning, it’s not surprising that they aren’t getting the fullest picture of what their systems are delivering. Backward-looking measurements aren’t likely to do as much as measurements built on a hospital’ls entire vision for success. Let’s see what happens when hospitals focus on ROI as a top-of-mind item going forward.

November 23, 2012 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies.

Hospitals Behind On EMR ROI Measurements

Buying an EMR is one of biggest investments a hospital IT department is likely to make. To date, however, few hospitals are planning for and implementing EMR ROI measures early in the game, according to a new study from Beacon Partners.

Beacon interviewed more than 300 healthcare leaders about the clinical system performance measures they used for their EMR, as well as the resulting ROI.  What researchers found out was that most respondents weren’t happy with their organization’s attempts to measure the ROI on their EMR spend — and that many hospitals aren’t directly measuring ROI at all.

According to healthcare leaders who spoke with Beacon, quality management and IT departments, rather than financial executives,  generally institute EMR performance measures. All told, 40 percent of respondents said that they were using performance measures, but only 36 percent were satisfied with the extent to which the data was being used to measure the value EMRs brought to their organization, Beacon reports.

The problem may spring from a lack of planning. According to Beacon’s respondents, less than half (48 percent) of performance measures are determined during planning.  In fact, 32 percent of providers said that performance measures were implemented in at least one patient care area post-EMR implementation.  Fifty-one percent of respondents said that they would have preferred to implement clinical system performance measures earlier than they had done so.

It’s hard to tell what would deter these healthcare execs —  mostly leaders with community hospitals — from demanding more results from their EMR investment. My best guess, though, is that adhering to Meaningful Use guidelines has taken up all of their bandwidth, and that CFOs have been mollified by the promise of incentive payments from the feds.

As the Beacon study suggests, though, healthcare leaders aren’t satisfied with this state of affairs. Vendors, expect to get more searching questions about ROI measurement over the next year or two.

October 26, 2012 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies.