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2 Core Healthcare IT Principles

Posted on May 10, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of my favorite bloggers I found when I first starting blogging about Healthcare IT was a hospital CIO named Will Weider who blogged on a site he called Candid CIO. At the time he was CIO of Ministry Health Care and he always offered exceptional insights from his perspective as a hospital CIO. A little over a month ago, Will decided to move on as CIO after 22 years. That was great news for me since it meant he’d probably have more time to blog. The good news is that he has been posting more.

In a recent post, Will offered two guiding principles that I thought were very applicable to any company working to take part in the hospital health IT space:

1. Embed everything in the EHR
2. Don’t hijack the physician workflow

Go and read Will’s post to get his insights, but I agree with both of these principles.

I would add one clarification to his first point. I think there is a space for an outside provider to work outside of the EHR. Think of someone like a care manager. EHR software doesn’t do care management well and so I think there’s a space for a third party care management platform. However, if you want the doctor to access it, then it has to be embedded in the EHR. It’s amazing how much of a barrier a second system is for a doctor.

Ironically, we’ve seen the opposite is also true for people like radiologists. If it’s not in their PACS interface, then it takes a nearly herculean effort for them to leave their PACS system to look something up in the EHR. That’s why I was excited to see some PACS interfaces at RSNA last year which had the EHR data integrated into the radiologists’ interface. The same is true for doctors working in an EHR.

Will’s second point is a really strong one. In his description of this principle, he even suggests that alerts should all but be done away within an EHR except for “the most critical safety situations. He’s right that alert blindness is real and I haven’t seen anyone nail the alerts so well that doctors aren’t happy to see the alerts. That’s the bar we should place on alerts that hijack the physician workflow. Will the doctor be happy you hijacked their workflow and gave them the alert? If the answer is no, then you probably shouldn’t send it.

Welcome back to the blogosphere Will! I look forward to many more posts from you in the future.

EHR Alerts, Top 10 Health IT Topics, Gesture Based EHR, and Adverse Events

Posted on December 18, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I thought it might be valuable to highlight a few interesting tweets I’ve seen recently. Some of them come from the other Healthcare Scene blogs, but I think you’ll find interesting.


Have alerts helped your organization? Alert fatigue is a very real thing, but when calibrated effectively, I’ve seen them really benefit an organization.


This is a fun list of healthcare topics. Do you see any topics that should be added to the list?


We’ve heard about gesture based EHR many times before. Mostly in the surgery room and mostly as demonstration projects. I don’t think this will really go huge and mainstream in healthcare, but could likely get some pickup for very targeted use cases.


Carl does a really great job in this article talking about Adverse Events and the legislation that’s proposed around EHR adverse events. This is a really important topic that doesn’t get nearly enough attention.

Stanford EMR-Based Program Lowers Use of Transfusions

Posted on June 14, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

Four  years ago, Stanford Hospital & Clinics decided to see if it could cut back on unnecessary blood transfusions, procedures which, though sometimes life-saving, also carry risk to patients and may needlessly use up limited blood supplies. Right now, blood transfusions happen in more than 10 percent of all hospital stays which include a procedure, and they’ve been named by the American Medical Association one of five most overused medical treatments.

To address the transfusion issue, Stanford created an alarm in its EMR which encouraged doctors to think twice before they went ahead with a transfusion order. Every time a doctor requests blood through the Stanford EMR, a pop-up appears which asks the doctor to explain the reason for the request and shares guidelines on blood use.  At that point, physicians can cancel the order if they so desire..

The program seems to have been a smashing success. The new prompt contributed to a 24 percent decline in use of red blood cells at Stanford between 2009 and 2012, according to Stanford’s Scope blog. What’s more, transfusions of all blood products at the hospital fell from more than 60,204 to 48,678 per year during that time.

In making this shift, Stanford is now on board with national trends. According to the American Red Cross, which supplies about half of the U.S.’s blood, blood use fell by 3 percent in 2011 and another 5 percent in 2012, Scope reports.

While saving precious, inherently limited blood supplies sounds like a good idea, I do wonder whether adding yet another alarm to override is the best way to accomplish this otherwise laudable goal. And this piece from Scope doesn’t say anything about whether they’ve tracked the outcomes of cases where transfusion was considered and rejected.

Still, if the transfusion reminder is easy to respond to, and dismiss if necessary, perhaps it’s worth the distraction to treatment teams. I guess the proof will be in the long-term patient outcomes of this intervention, which seemingly remain to be seen.