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An HIM Twitter Roundup – HIM Scene

Posted on December 13, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

For those that aren’t participating on Twitter, you’re missing out. The amount of knowledge and information that’s shared on Twitter is astounding. The problem is that many people think that Twitter is where you go to talk about yourself. Certainly, that’s an option if you want to do that, but I find that consuming information that people share on Twitter is extremely valuable.

If you’ve never done Twitter before, sign up (it’s free) and then you need to go in and follow about 50 HIM professionals and other healthcare influencers. You can start by following @healthcarescene. HIM professionals are easy to find. Just search for the term AHIMA or ICD-10 and you’ll find a lot of them to follow.

Ok, enough of the Twitter lesson. Just to show you some of the value of Twitter, here’s a quick roundup of HIM related tweets. Plus, I’ll add a little commentary of my own after each tweet.


This is becoming such an important role for HIM professionals in a healthcare organization. HIM staff can do an amazing work ensuring that the data that’s stored in an EHR or other clinical system is accurate. If the data’s wrong, then all these new data based decisions are going to be wrong.


I think upcoding stories are like an accident on the freeway. When you see one you just have to look.


I’m still chewing on this one. Looks like a lot of deep thoughts at the AHIMA Data Summit in Orlando.


The opioid epidemic is such an issue. We need everyone involved to solve it. So, it’s great to see HIM can help with the problem as well. I agree that proper documentation and EHR interoperability is a major problem that could help the opioid epidemic. It won’t solve everything, but proper EHR documentation is one important part.


This is an illustration of where healthcare is heading. So far we’ve mostly focused on data collection. Time to turn the corner and start using that data in decision making.

Opening the Door to Data Analytics in Medical Coding – HIM Scene

Posted on November 15, 2017 I Written By

The following is a HIM Scene guest blog post by Julia Hammerman, RHIA, CPHQ, is Director of Education and Compliance, himagine solutions.

Data analytics has moved from IT and finance to the majority of business functions—including clinical coding. However, most healthcare organizations admit they could do more with analytics. This month’s HIM Scene blog explores the importance of analyzing clinical coding data to improve quality, productivity, and compliance.

Coding Data in ICD-10: Where We Are Today

HIM leaders are implementing coding data analytics to continually monitor their coding teams and cost-justify ongoing educational investments. Coding data analytics isn’t a once-and-done endeavor. It is a long-term commitment to improving coding performance in two key areas: productivity and accuracy.

A Look at Productivity Data

Elements that impact coding productivity data include: the type of electronic health record (EHR) used, the number of systems accessed during the coding process, clinical documentation improvement (CDI) initiatives, turnaround time for physician queries, and the volume of non-coding tasks assigned to coding teams.

Once any coding delays caused by these issues are corrected, coding productivity is best managed with the help of data analytics. For optimal productivity monitoring, the following data must be tracked, entered, and analyzed:

  • Begin and end times for each record—by coder and chart type
  • Average number of charts coded per hour by coder
  • Percentage of charts that take more than the standard minutes to code—typically charts with long lengths of stay (LOS), high dollar or high case mix index (CMI)
  • Types of cases each coder is processing every day

A Look at Accuracy Data

Accuracy should never be compromised for productivity. Otherwise, the results include denied claims, payer scrutiny, reimbursement issues, and other negative financial impacts.

Instead, a careful balance between coding productivity and accuracy is considered best practice.

Both data sets must be assessed simultaneously. The most common way to collect coding accuracy data is through coding audits and a thorough analysis of coding denials.

  • Conduct routine coding accuracy audits
  • Analyze audit data to target training, education and other corrective action
  • Record data so that back-end analysis is supported
  • Assess results for individual coders and the collective team

Using Your Results

Results of data analysis are important to drive improvements at the individual level and across entire coding teams. For individuals, look for specific errors and provide coaching based on the results of every audit. Include tips, recommendations, and resources to improve. If the coding professional’s accuracy continues to trend downward, targeted instruction and refresher coursework are warranted with focused re-audits to assure improvement over time.

HIM and coding managers can analyze coding audit data across an entire team to identify patterns and trends in miscoding. Team data pinpoints where multiple coders may be struggling. Coding hotlines or question queues are particularly helpful for large coding teams working remotely and from different geographic areas. Common questions can be aggregated for knowledge sharing across the team.

Analytics Technology and Support: What’s Needed

While spreadsheets are still used as the primary tool for much data analysis in healthcare, this option will not suffice in the expanded world of ICD-10. Greater technology investments are necessary to equip HIM and coding leaders with the coding data analytics technology they need.

The following technology guidelines can help evaluate new coding systems and level-up data analytics staff:

  • Data analytics programs with drill-down capabilities are imperative. These systems are used to effectively manage and prevent denials.
  • Customized workflow management software allows HIM and coding leaders to assign coding queues based on skillset.
  • Discharged not final coded and discharged not final billed analytics tools are important to manage each piece of accounts receivables daily and provide continual reporting.
  • Systems should have the ability to build rules to automatically send cases to an audit queue based on specific factors, such as diagnosis, trend, problematic DRGs.
  • Capabilities to export and manipulate the data within other systems, such as Excel, while also trending data are critical.
  • Staff will need training on advanced manipulation of data, such as pivot charts.
  • Every HIM department should have a copy of the newly revised AHIMA Health Data Analysis Toolkit, free of charge for AHIMA members.

HIM directors already collect much of the coding data required for improved performance and better decision-making. By adding data analytics software, organizations ensure information is available for bottom-line survival and future growth.

If you’d like to receive future HIM posts in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

Heard at #AHIMACon17: Lessons Learned for HIM – HIM Scene

Posted on October 18, 2017 I Written By

The following is a HIM Scene guest blog post by Rita Bowen, MA, RHIA, CHPS, CHPC, SSGB, Vice President, Privacy, Compliance and HIM Policy, at MRO.  

The American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA) held its annual convention and exhibit in Los Angeles last week. Beginning with preconvention meetings and symposia, this year’s event delivered a renewed focus on the profession’s stalwart responsibility to protect and govern patient information. Updates for privacy, security, interoperability and information governance were provided. Here is a quick overview of my lessons learned at AHIMACon17.

Privacy and Security Institute

The 11th anniversary of AHIMA’s Privacy and Security Institute didn’t disappoint. Speakers from the HHS Office for Civil Rights (OCR), Federal Bureau of Investigations (FBI) and HITRUST joined privacy and HIM consultants for an information-packed two-day symposium. The most important information for HIM professionals and privacy officers came from the nation’s capital.

Cutbacks underway—Recent defunding of the Chief Privacy Officer (CPO) position by ONC makes practical sense for the healthcare industry and the national budget. The position has been vacant for the past year, and during this time Deven McGraw successfully served as acting CPO and deputy director for health information privacy. Her imminent departure along with other cutbacks will have a trickle-down impact for privacy compliance in 2018.

Onsite audits cease—Yun-kyung (Peggy) Lee, Deputy Regional Manager, OCR, informed attendees that onsite HIPAA audits would no longer be conducted for covered entities or business associates due to staffing cutbacks in Washington, D.C. The concern here is that whatever doesn’t get regulatory attention, may not get done.

To ensure a continued focus on privacy monitoring, HIM and privacy professionals must remain diligent at the organizational, regional, state and national levels to:

  • Maintain internal privacy audit activities
  • Review any patterns in privacy issues and address through corrective action
  • Use environmental scanning to assess resolution agreement results
  • Review published privacy complaints to determine how to handle similar situations
  • Compare your state of readiness to known complaints

Interoperability advances HIPAA—The national push for greater interoperability is an absolute necessity to improve healthcare delivery. However, 30 years of new technology and communication capabilities must be incorporated into HIPAA rules. Old guidelines block us from addressing new goals. We expect more fine-tuning of HIPAA in 2018 to achieve the greater good of patient access and health information exchange.

Luminary Healthcare Panel

Tuesday’s keynote session was the second most relevant discussion for my role as vice president of privacy, compliance and HIM policy at MRO. Panelists provided a glimpse into the future of healthcare while reiterating HIM’s destiny—data integrity and information governance.

HIM’s role extends beyond ensuring correctly coded data for revenue cycle performance. It also includes the provision of correct and complete data for the entire healthcare enterprise and patient care continuum under value-based reimbursement. The need for stronger data integrity and overall information governance was threaded through every conversation during this session.

Final Takeaway

Make no doubt about it! HIM’s role is expanding. We have the underlying knowledge of the importance of data and the information it yields. More technology leads to more data and an increased need for sophisticated health information management and governance. Our history of protecting patient information opens the door to our future in the healthcare industry.

About Rita Bowen
In her role as Vice President of Privacy, Compliance and HIM Policy for MRO, Bowen serves as the company’s Privacy and Compliance Officer (PCO), oversees the company’s compliance with HIPAA, and ensures new and existing client HIM policies and procedures are to code. She has more than 40 years of experience in Health Information Management (HIM), holding a variety of HIM director and consulting roles. Prior to joining MRO, she was Senior Vice President and Privacy Officer for HealthPort, Inc., now known as CIOX Health. Bowen is an active member of the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA), having served as its President and Board Chair, as a member of the Board of Directors, and of the Council on Certification. Additionally, Bowen is the chair for the AHIMA Foundation. She has been honored with AHIMA’s Triumph Award in the mentor category; she is also the recipient of the Distinguished Member Award from the Tennessee Health Information Management Association (THIMA). Bowen is an established author and speaker on HIM topics and has taught HIM studies at Chattanooga State and the University of Tennessee Memphis. Bowen holds a Bachelor of Medical Science degree with a focus in medical record administration and a Master’s degree in Health Information/ Informatics Management Technology.

MRO is a proud sponsor of HIM Scene.  If you’d like to receive future HIM posts in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

How to Balance Privacy, Security and Quality with Offshore Coding: Three Critical Caveats for HIM – HIM Scene

Posted on October 4, 2017 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Sarah Humbert, RHIA, ICD-10 AHIMA Certified Trainer, Coding and Compliance Manager, KIWI-TEK. If you’d like to receive future HIM posts in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

Prior to ICD-10 there was a shortage of domestic coders, making offshore services a necessity for many organizations. But in a post ICD-10 environment, experienced U.S. coders are more readily available and accessible. Domestic coding services are still considered best practice by most HIM professionals. In fact, 72 percent of hospital respondents outsource more than half of their coding needs according Black Book’s October 2016 Outsourced HIM Report.

While acceptance of offshore coding services has grown there are important caveats for HIM professionals to know according to the Black Book report. Price isn’t everything when it comes to protecting your patient’s privacy and your organization’s financial performance. Additional offshore concerns continue to be reported by U.S. hospitals and health systems:

  • Increased audit costs
  • Higher denial rates
  • Missed procedure codes

As Black Book states, it is imperative for offshore coding companies to tighten processes in three key areas: privacy, security and quality. With ransomware on the rise, hospitals, health systems and medical groups have greater levels of responsibility to fully assess their business associates—especially those using protected health information (PHI) offshore.

Because of these concerns and those mentioned above, HIM professionals must carefully explore, vet and secure detailed service level agreements prior to even considering the offshore option. This month’s blog lays out three critical caveats to consider and weigh against the proven value of domestic coding services.

Verify and Test Privacy and Security for Offshore Coding

The first step for HIM professionals is to understand the annual attestation requirements. Originally required by CMS for Medicare Advantage (MA) plans, the following annual attestations have become best practice for healthcare provider organizations and other covered entities (CEs) working to protect PHI.

  1. Provide notice to CMS—30 days prior to beginning the contractual relationship—that offshore contractors will be used, providing CMS an opportunity to review and raise an objection if warranted.
  2. Sign an annual attestation to accurately report to CMS the use of any offshore contractors.

For example, if a hospital wants to use a coding or billing company with personnel located offshore, it must submit the initial notification, receive no objections from CMS, and then annually attest that protections are in place with the offshore vendor.

Beyond the two-step attestation process, HIM professionals must take the following five precautionary steps with all offshore HIM services vendors.

  • Discuss any offshore contacts with your legal counsel and the vendor prior to signing.
  • Include language to indicate that onshore vendors will not subcontract with offshore vendors or coders.
  • Make sure your vendors are aware of attestation rules and take precautions to safeguard PHI.
  • Obtain cybersecurity insurance that includes coverage for potential breaches of offshore data.
  • Identify any other clinical services that may be provided offshore, such as coding audits, and consult your legal counsel to determine if that service should be identified in the attestation.

Rigorous due diligence of offshore coding vendor privacy and security safeguards ensures HIM professionals are doing their part in reducing PHI breaches and ransomware attacks in healthcare. Six states went a step further by prohibiting Medicaid members from sending any PHI offshore: Arizona, Ohio, Missouri, Arkansas, Wisconsin and New Jersey. If your state provides healthcare services in any of these states, additional review by legal counsel is mandatory.

Watch Offshore Coding Quality

The second area for concern with offshore medical record coding services is accuracy.

Offshore coders are mostly former nurses or other well-educated candidates. Although global coding staff speak English and are highly competent, they may not be well trained in self-directed chart interpretation.

Our clients often report international coding accuracy concerns and the need for additional audits, higher denials and missed procedure codes—especially as global coders expand beyond relatively simple and repetitive ancillary testing and radiology cases. In fact, 22 percent of HIM executives continue to shy away from a non-U.S. workforce, according to Black Book.

When it comes to coding quality, here are five recommendations to measure, monitor and manage accuracy prior to engaging an offshore coder.

  • Confirm who is actually doing your coding initially, and after each month into the services engagement.
  • Know global coders’ credentials, testing results and accuracy scores.
  • Verify that less experienced coders aren’t engaged following the initial work assignment.
  • Conduct a minimum of monthly coding audits to quickly identify and correct any negative trend or patterns.
  • Refuse to accept lower quality standards for offshore coding.

Re-evaluate Your Options

The medical record coding industry has shifted. Now is the time to re-evaluate the risks and returns of offshore coding services—keeping privacy, security and quality top of mind.

About Sarah Humbert
Sarah serves as the manager of coding and compliance at KIWI-TEK, a 100% domestic coding and audit services company. She is responsible for coding quality control—accuracy, turnaround time and compliance.

Sarah oversees all coding processes, including coders’ performance, credentials and recurrent testing. She is a member of AHIMA, IHIMA, CHIMA, and she is also a Certified ICD-10 AHIMA trainer. Sarah has worked in a variety of health information management positions for Health Care Excel, MedFocus and St. Vincent Health System.

KIWI-TEK is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene. If you’d like to receive future HIM posts in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

Preview of #AHIMACon17 – HIM Scene

Posted on September 7, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

If you’d like to receive future HIM posts in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

I thought it might be interesting to check out the #AHIMACon17 conference hashtag for the AHIMA Annual Convention to get an idea of what the hot topics were going to be going into the annual convention. Unfortunately, there wasn’t much conversation happening on the hashtag yet. Here’s a sample of a few things I found and some of my commentary about each.


I’m excited to hear Viola Davis as well. I’m sure she has some amazing stories. It’s not clear to me her connection to healthcare, but I’m all about hearing the stories of successful people. I hope they let her tell her story and not try to have her be a healthcare speaker. Ironically, the MGMA Annual Conference is happening at the same time as the AHIMA Annual Convention about 45 minutes away. Viola Davis is keynoting both. I’m not sure if they planned this together or if it’s just coincidence. Either way, I guess I get 2 chances to hear Viola, but trying to manage both events is hard.


This tweet from Ciox made me laugh. There’s a lot of things in healthcare that are still stuck in the 80s. As Mr. H from HIStalk likes to say, Healthcare is where old technology goes to die. There’s certainly some modernization that could happen at about every healthcare organization.


This tweet is ironic after the above tweet talking about the need to modernize. I wonder how many in the AHIMA community are familiar with NLP based technology. For those not familiar, NLP stands for natural language processing. It can be used in a variety of ways, but in the AHIMA world it’s most commonly used to analyze medical records and assess if the documentation matches the coding. It’s pretty amazing technology. I also love seeing NLP used on narrative sections of a note to identify granular data elements that could be used to better inform clinical decision support tools. Do many HIM professionals care about this technology? Are they using it? I think I’ll ask when I’m at the event.


I think security will be an extremely hot topic this year. Given HIM’s role in doing release of information (ROI), it’s always had an important role. In fact, they have a pre-conference Privacy & Security Institute that I’ve heard a lot of great things about. I’m hoping to go this year if they let press attend.

Will you be at #AHIMACon17? What do you expect to be the hot topics? Are there sessions you absolutely must attend? Who’s going to throw the best party? I hope to see many of you at the conference!

If you’d like to receive future HIM posts in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

Did EMRs Help Hospitals Hit By Hurricane Harvey?

Posted on September 5, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

On August 25, 2005, Hurricane Katrina made landfall. Over the next few days, it devastated communities from Florida to Texas, generating massive storm surges and triggering levee failures that drowned cities like New Orleans. It was the costliest natural disaster in the history of the United States.

At the time, virtually all healthcare providers used paper medical records, many of which were destroyed by flooding. According to an AHIMA article, the flood waters destroyed roughly 400,000 paper records, a catastrophic loss by any standard.

The situation wasn’t nearly as dire at facilities like Tulane University Hospital and Clinic, though. The New Orleans-based organization had implemented an EMR before the storm hit. In the trying weeks afterward, physicians at these hospitals had access to medical records, while many other hospitals were struggling to gather patient information for months or even years after Katrina.

Now, we’re facing the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey, which has all but submerged the city of Houston. Days after the storm’s peak, which dumped a record 51.88 inches of rain on Texas, roughly a third of the Houston area was covered in water, and Texas officials estimated that close to 49,000 homes had suffered flood damage.

During the worst of the storm, some 20 Houston hospitals transferred some or all of their patients to facilities outside of the area as water rose in their basements or levees seemed ready to burst. In its immediate aftermath, many of the area’s 110 facilities shut down outpatient services and canceled elective surgeries.

But despite the challenges they faced, the majority of Houston-area hospitals remained open for business.  One reason for their ability to function: unlike the hospitals battered by Katrina, they have EMRs in place. The area didn’t see any major power outages and the systems seem to stayed online.

It’s hard to say whether New Orleans would’ve fared better if the city’s hospitals had already implemented EMRs. Houston hospitals were apparently better prepared for hurricane flooding, having put a host of storm fortifications in place after Tropical Storm Allison wreaked massive damage sixteen years ago.

That being said, it seems likely that the EMRs have helped hospitals keep the doors open and keep caring for patients. If nothing else, they gave facilities a giant head start over New Orleans hospitals post-disaster, which in some cases had virtually nothing to go on when delivering care.

Of course, digital data offers some significant advantages over paper records of any kind, including but not limited to the ability to backup records to off-site facilities well out of a given disaster zone.  But organizing patient data in an EMR, arguably, offers additional benefits, not the least of which is the ability to access existing workflows and protocols. Few tools are better suited to capturing, sharing and preserving care records in the midst of a catastrophic event like Harvey.

Over the next few decades, some observers predict that care will become massively decentralized, with remote nurses, telemedicine and connected health doing much of the heavy lifting day-to-day. If that comes to pass, and health IT intelligence is distributed across mobile devices instead, the EMR of today may be far less important to healthcare organizations hoping to rebound after a disaster. But until then, it’s safe to say that it’s a good thing Houston’s hospitals don’t rely on paper records anymore.

A Look Into the Future of HIM with Rita Bowen – HIM Scene

Posted on June 14, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the HIM Series of blog posts. If you’d like to receive future HIM posts in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

One of my favorite people in the HIM world is Rita Bowen. She is currently Vice President, Privacy, Compliance and HIM Policy at MRO, but she has a really impressive HIM resume previous to MRO and a deep understanding of the evolution of HIM and their role in healthcare.

With this experience in mind, I was excited to interview her on the current state of HIM and where HIM is heading in the future. Here are the list of questions I asked Rita if you want to skip to a specific question or you can just watch the full video interview embedded at the bottom of this post.

If you’d like to receive future HIM posts in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

A Look at the HIM World with Dr. Jon Elion from ChartWise Medical Systems – HIM Scene

Posted on April 5, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the HIM Series of blog posts. If you’d like to receive future HIM posts in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

Healthcare Scene had a chance to interview Dr. Jon Elion, founder and president of ChartWise Medical Systems where we asked him about some of the big happenings in Health Information Management (HIM) and how world of HIM is evolving. Dr. Elion offers some really great insights into the HIM profession. You can watch the full video interview embedded at the bottom of this post or click on one of the questions below to hear Dr. Elion’s answer to that question.

Find more great Healthcare Scene Interviews.

If you’d like to receive future HIM posts in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

HIM’s Role in Healthcare Security and Privacy – HIM Scene

Posted on November 30, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the HIM Series of blog posts. If you’d like to receive future HIM posts in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

One of my go-to experts on healthcare privacy and security is Mac McMillan, CEO and Co-Founder of CynergisTek. He’s built a really great company that focuses on privacy and security in healthcare and he’s a true expert.

While at AHIMA 2016, I talked with Mac about the role that HIM plays in healthcare privacy and security. We also talk about where healthcare privacy is heading and which part of healthcare privacy and security doesn’t get enough attention. I also asked Mac to make a big 20 year prediction on what will happen with privacy and security in healthcare.

Check out our interview with Mac McMillan, CEO and Co-Founder of CynergisTek:

We shot a number of other videos at AHIMA 2016 which we’ll be posting shortly. If you enjoyed this video, be sure to Subscribe to Healthcare Scene on YouTube and watch our full archive of Healthcare Scene interviews.

If you’d like to receive future HIM posts in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

Will Medical Coders Be Needed in the Future? – HIM Scene

Posted on October 26, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the HIM Series of blog posts. If you’d like to receive future HIM posts in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

After spending time with so many HIM professionals at the AHIMA Annual conference, I’ve come back thinking about the future of medical coders. No doubt, many HIM professionals are moving well beyond medical coding into other areas such as healthcare analytics, clinical documentation improvement (CDI), EHR optimization, and much more. However, there’s still a massive need for high quality medical coding and the HIM professionals that provide that service.

As we look into the future, the techie in me feels like medical coding should be automated. Why are we paying people to do medical coding? Why can’t that be automated and be done by robots? It’s not like medical coding is a particularly fun job. I’m sure there are some times it’s fun working on unique cases, but it can be quite monotonous and tedious. Why not have a computer do it instead?

What I’ve learned over the years is that medical coding is more art than it is science. Certainly there are some clear cut cases where it’s basically science. However, a large part of what a coder does isn’t set in stone. There’s some artistic licence if you will, or at least some interpretation that has to happen in order to code a visit properly. Computers aren’t good at interpretation, but humans are.

The other reality is that doctors don’t produce perfect documentation. If they did, then we probably could code a robot to code a patient visit. Since there are nuances to every physician’s documentation, we’re going to need humans that interpret those nuances as part of the coding process. I don’t see this changing in our lifetimes.

One word of caution. Many people fall into the trap that we need automated robot coding to be perfect for it to accepted. That’s just not the case, because human coders aren’t perfect either. In fact, there’s some research that human coders aren’t as good as we thought they were at coding, but I digress. The reality is that automated coding just has to be better than humans, it doesn’t have to be perfect. Even with this said, I don’t see it happening for a while.

What we do see happening now is a collaboration between humans and computers: computer assisted coding. While we don’t have to worry about computers replacing humans in medical coding, we do need to focus on ways that technology can make the work humans do better. That’s a powerful concept that we’re starting to see happen already.

If you’d like to receive future HIM posts in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.