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A Look at the HIM World with Dr. Jon Elion from ChartWise Medical Systems – HIM Scene

Posted on April 5, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the HIM Series of blog posts. If you’d like to receive future HIM posts in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

Healthcare Scene had a chance to interview Dr. Jon Elion, founder and president of ChartWise Medical Systems where we asked him about some of the big happenings in Health Information Management (HIM) and how world of HIM is evolving. Dr. Elion offers some really great insights into the HIM profession. You can watch the full video interview embedded at the bottom of this post or click on one of the questions below to hear Dr. Elion’s answer to that question.

Find more great Healthcare Scene Interviews.

If you’d like to receive future HIM posts in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

HIM’s Role in Healthcare Security and Privacy – HIM Scene

Posted on November 30, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the HIM Series of blog posts. If you’d like to receive future HIM posts in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

One of my go-to experts on healthcare privacy and security is Mac McMillan, CEO and Co-Founder of CynergisTek. He’s built a really great company that focuses on privacy and security in healthcare and he’s a true expert.

While at AHIMA 2016, I talked with Mac about the role that HIM plays in healthcare privacy and security. We also talk about where healthcare privacy is heading and which part of healthcare privacy and security doesn’t get enough attention. I also asked Mac to make a big 20 year prediction on what will happen with privacy and security in healthcare.

Check out our interview with Mac McMillan, CEO and Co-Founder of CynergisTek:

We shot a number of other videos at AHIMA 2016 which we’ll be posting shortly. If you enjoyed this video, be sure to Subscribe to Healthcare Scene on YouTube and watch our full archive of Healthcare Scene interviews.

If you’d like to receive future HIM posts in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

Will Medical Coders Be Needed in the Future? – HIM Scene

Posted on October 26, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the HIM Series of blog posts. If you’d like to receive future HIM posts in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

After spending time with so many HIM professionals at the AHIMA Annual conference, I’ve come back thinking about the future of medical coders. No doubt, many HIM professionals are moving well beyond medical coding into other areas such as healthcare analytics, clinical documentation improvement (CDI), EHR optimization, and much more. However, there’s still a massive need for high quality medical coding and the HIM professionals that provide that service.

As we look into the future, the techie in me feels like medical coding should be automated. Why are we paying people to do medical coding? Why can’t that be automated and be done by robots? It’s not like medical coding is a particularly fun job. I’m sure there are some times it’s fun working on unique cases, but it can be quite monotonous and tedious. Why not have a computer do it instead?

What I’ve learned over the years is that medical coding is more art than it is science. Certainly there are some clear cut cases where it’s basically science. However, a large part of what a coder does isn’t set in stone. There’s some artistic licence if you will, or at least some interpretation that has to happen in order to code a visit properly. Computers aren’t good at interpretation, but humans are.

The other reality is that doctors don’t produce perfect documentation. If they did, then we probably could code a robot to code a patient visit. Since there are nuances to every physician’s documentation, we’re going to need humans that interpret those nuances as part of the coding process. I don’t see this changing in our lifetimes.

One word of caution. Many people fall into the trap that we need automated robot coding to be perfect for it to accepted. That’s just not the case, because human coders aren’t perfect either. In fact, there’s some research that human coders aren’t as good as we thought they were at coding, but I digress. The reality is that automated coding just has to be better than humans, it doesn’t have to be perfect. Even with this said, I don’t see it happening for a while.

What we do see happening now is a collaboration between humans and computers: computer assisted coding. While we don’t have to worry about computers replacing humans in medical coding, we do need to focus on ways that technology can make the work humans do better. That’s a powerful concept that we’re starting to see happen already.

If you’d like to receive future HIM posts in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

Integrating CDI Efforts Across Inpatient and Outpatient – HIM Scene

Posted on October 19, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the HIM Series of blog posts. If you’d like to receive future HIM posts in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

One of the main topics HIM professionals have been discussing for a couple years is around CDI (Clinical Documentation Improvement). These programs have taken all sorts of shapes and sizes. Some are completely human driven. Others are largely tech driven, but most are a mix of the two. In fact, most CDI programs have gotten quite sophisticated and are really impacting the bottom line of healthcare organizations.

While most healthcare organizations realize that there are benefits to CDI, most of them have restricted these programs to the inpatient environment only. This was illustrated to me really well when I ran into a transcription vendor from India. It was his first time attending AHIMA and he was considering new areas of business including CDI. When we talked about CDI, his first comment was that he’d only ever seen CDI in hospitals, not in the ambulatory world.

While this is the case today, one HIM expert at AHIMA told me that one of the next big frontiers for CDI is going to be outpatient CDI. She went on to tell me that it’s fertile ground that could really benefit every healthcare organization. However, she also suggested that there shouldn’t be two CDI programs: 1 for inpatient and 1 for outpatient. Instead, CDI should be an integrated effort across inpatient and outpatient.

Clinical documentation improvement is only going to become more important in healthcare. Certainly, most CDI projects were started as a way to improve reimbursement. That’s a good goal and a benefit of a high quality CDI project. However, over time CDI is going to become even more important to an organization’s value based reimbursement efforts. In fact, if your clinical documentation isn’t accurate your reimbursement will really suffer. How can you keep a patient healthy if you’ve documented the wrong information for a patient?

How is your organization approaching CDI? Are you doing CDI in both inpatient and outpatient?

If you’d like to receive future HIM posts in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

Looking Forward to #AHIMACon16 – HIM Scene

Posted on October 12, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the HIM Series of blog posts. If you’d like to receive future HIM posts in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

As we prepare to head to the 2016 AHIMA Annual convention (see our full list of conferences we attend), we’re excited to talk about how we’re planning to expand HIM Scene to include as many HIM voices and perspectives as possible. HIM Scene will still be hosted here on Hospital EMR and EHR and will still have its own email list where HIM professionals can receive great HIM related content from thought leaders across the industry. However, we’ll be using HIM Scene to share a wide variety of people and perspectives.

The HIM industry is an amazing group of devoted people and that really comes through at every AHIMA annual convention I attend. Plus, HIM has a lot more influence than many people realize. So, we’re happy to do what we can to raise the voices and perspectives of HIM professionals here at HIM Scene.

Looking forward to the AHIMA Annual convention next week in Baltimore, we’re excited to learn about a number of important topics. Here are a few we’ll be sure to report on in future HIM Scene posts:

ICD-10 – A year after implementation, I’m really interested to hear the real stories of how ICD-10 has impacted healthcare organizations for good and bad. I bet there will be a lot of stories that haven’t been shared. I’ll also asking the HIM professionals I meet what they think the impact of the end of the ICD-10 grace period will have on healthcare. I wonder how many will have stories of ICD-10 improving care versus stories of ICD-10 for reimbursement.

Information Governance – This is an eternally hot topic in HIM, but it always continues to evolve. This is particularly true as records have gone electronic. This year I wonder how many people have been involved in some sort of health data sharing project. Information governance can get pretty tricky as healthcare organizations start to share data with each other electronically.

HIPAA Privacy and Security – A really hot topic given all the HIPAA breaches and ransomware incidents in healthcare. I’m sure I’ll find a number of HIPAA privacy officers that will share some good insights into how they’re dealing with these security and privacy challenges. I’m afraid many of them will give me exasperated responses about how their leadership isn’t taking it serious enough.

Informatics – I’ve been really intrigued with HIM’s role in healthcare informatics. Once you dive in, it makes since why HIM would be involved, but I don’t think most people saw that at first. What’s also been interesting to watch is many HIM professionals who’ve kind of shunned their involvement in healthcare informatics. We’ll see if many are still in that position or if most HIM professionals are starting to embrace and participate in the informatics efforts of their organizations.

What hot topics will you be looking for at the 2016 AHIMA Annual Convention? The AHIMA 2016 theme is to “Inspire Big Thinking to Launch Our Future.” We’ll be sure to report back any big thinking we hear from people we meet.

ahima-2016

If you’d like to receive future HIM posts in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.