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Image Showing Tug of War Between Providers and Healthcare Execs

Posted on May 5, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

If you haven’t noticed I’ve been struck by images lately. We’ve done a lot of humor, but this image shared by Medfusion tells a very different story. Take a look.

Of course, I think this is just a stock image that they must have found. It really does illustrate well the tug of war that exists in many hospitals. I’m sure that those reading this blog know this tug of war all too well. There are exceptions where everyone is rowing together, but a lot of times the providers and the healthcare execs are pulling each other different directions.

In some ways this is good if there’s a good balance between the two. Both priorities are important. If the healthcare execs can’t run a good business, then the hospital will close up shop. That’s not good for anyone. If the doctors can’t ensure quality care to patients, then that’s bad for patients and business long term.

I think the girl in the scrubs that I think might be portraying a nurse doesn’t seem that into the battle. I think that’s true in many hospitals where the nurses aren’t listened to enough and so many of them stop fighting. It’s a pity since when I think of all my hospital visits, I think of the nurses.

I’m sure I could go on about this picture. It’s really well done. I wonder what it takes to get everyone pulling in the same direction?

Do Hospital #HIT Leaders Need Business Coaches?

Posted on May 4, 2015 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

Though they don’t always cop to it, a goodly number of senior business leaders pay very good money — I’ve heard quotes as high as $10,000 a year — for the help of an executive coach. Part high-end consultant, part amateur therapist, executive coaches help VPs and C-suite execs make better decisions by giving them an unvarnished view of their current situation and the inspiration to carry out their most ambitious plans.

This may have something in common with bringing on a partner like, say, Deloitte, but it’s decidedly different. While executive coaches may have worked in a bigshot consulting firm like PwC, their relationship is decidedly with the individual, and a trusted one at that.  The process of executive coaching sounds like a very useful one. (I’ll probably try it someday — when I have $10,000 to spare!)

The thing is, while I could be missing something, I’ve never heard so much as a hint that senior HIT executives are retaining executive coaches. It makes me wonder whether CtOs and VPs of IT still define their job largely by technical skills rather than their capacity for making strategic decisions with hospital- or system-wide implications.

The inescapable reality is that HIT execs have long outgrown supergeek status and are increasingly a key part of their healthcare organization’s future. So if they’re open for growth, HIT leaders may very well want to test out the executive coaching model, particularly in working out the following:

  • ACO development:  While the ACO contracting and development process may be led by other departments, health IT leaders have the power to make or break these agreements by how they support then. A VP of business development may spearhead such efforts, but it’s the health IT exec who will make or break how effectively the ACO handles population health support, risk management, data analytics and more.
  • Managing digital health: I hardly need to remind HIT execs of this, but the most important directives as to how to work with digital health tools aren’t going to come from the CEO down, but from the CIO or VP up. With the healthcare industry just beginning to grasp the value app-laden smartphones and tablets, smart watches, sensor-laden clothing, telemedicine and other rapidly emerging  technologies can bring, it’s the health IT exec who must lead the charge. And that means knowing how to solve critical business problems that extend well beyond IT’s boundaries.
  • EMR transformation: As hard as you’ve worked on implementing and tuning your EMR, it’d be nice to think you could stick a fork in it and consider it done.  But EMRs are having new demands placed on them seemingly every day, including integration of massive volumes of wearables and other patient-generated data; number-crunching and making sense of population health data; connecting revenue cycle management functions with EMRs and much more.  Deciding how to handle this spectrum of issues is the job of a business/tech thinker, not solely an IT guru.

Look, I’m not suggesting that the executive coaching is for everyone, health IT executives included. But I do believe that the right kind of executive coaching relationship could help HIT leaders to make a smoother transition into the even more critical role they are inheriting today. And anything that supports that transition is probably worth a shot.

Big Data Cartoon for Healthcare – Fun Friday

Posted on May 1, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Does this resonate with any of you? Do you have a bunch of big data in your hospitals that you’ve been collecting and you’re not sure what you’re doing with all that data?

I once heard Dana Sellers from Encore Health Resources ask the question, “What could we do with just the meaningful use data?” I think framing the use of data in that way is quite interesting.

EHR Implementation Infographic

Posted on April 30, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Is this EHR implementation infographic no longer needed? Or are we about to enter a new EHR switching market where EHR implementation information is going to become really important?

I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments.
EHR Implementation Infographic

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center Rolls Out Apple HealthKit

Posted on April 29, 2015 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

Racking up yet another win in a string of deals with prominent health systems and hospitals, Apple has won Cedars-Sinai Medical Center over to running its HealthKit platform. According to Bloomberg, the agreement which connects 80,000 patients to HealthKit is the largest integration project done with HealthKit to date.

Apple caught a lead in the patient health data game early on, snagging high-profile Ochsner Health System as its first customer in October of last year. And HealthKit has continued to see success. A Reuters story reported in February that 14 of 23 top U.S. hospitals contacted by the news organization had rolled out a pilot program testing the platform. In other words, while it has formidable competition, Apple seems to have already become the platform of choice for experimenting with patient generated data.

It has to have helped that HealthKit was already set to connect with a wide range of consumer health tracking apps. Within months of its summer 2014 launch, Apple could boast a family of more than 60 apps that connected to the platform, including Withings app HealthMate, Weight Watchers Mobile, a Panera Bread app allowing users to plan meals at the store, a  Mayo Clinic app, Epic’s MyChart portal app and more.

But Apple’s competitors in the consumer health space aren’t going to give up without a fight. With the wearables market reaching 21% of consumers, fellow behemoths like Samsung, Google and Microsoft will continue to challenge Apple for the patient-generated data crown.

Microsoft, for example, has launched a collection of wearables devices — including a fitness-tracking wristband, mobile health app and cloud-based health data platform called Microsoft Health. In Microsoft’s architecture, users store health and fitness data generated by wearables, which is, in turn collected by the Health app. And remember Microsoft’s HealthVault PHR?  It finds new life here, as another place for patients to store the data they personally generate.

Google also announced its a fitness and health tracking platform last summer, dubbed Google Fit. Google Fit is an open platform offering the platform SDK freely to developers. At launch, its partners included Nike+, Adidas, Motorola, Runkeeper and HTC.

Samsung, for its part, has positioned itself in more of a support role to the wearables revolution. Last May it introduced the Samsung Simband, a reference architecture for wearables. It also released open health data cloud platform SAMI (Samsung Architecture for Multimodal Interactions), which takes data from multiple sources and drills down on the data to analyze the health status of individual users.

But despite the massive firepower behind Apple’s competitors, Apple seems to have slipped ahead and taken the marketing high ground. Expect to see lots of hospitals announce that HealthKit is their patient-generated data platform of choice over the next few years. It seems like Apple is doing the right thing at the right time.

Overcapacity in Inpatient Business

Posted on April 28, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In a recent conversation I had with Bill Anderson, Chairman and CEO of Medhost, he made this really insightful observation, “We have overcapacity in the inpatient business.”

I’m sure there are some exceptions in certain areas, but I believe that Bill is right about the healthcare system on the whole. We have overcapacity in the inpatient business. Unlike other businesses, where you want to drive more demand for a product or service, healthcare is somewhat unique in that we want to try and continue to decrease demand for healthcare services that a hospital provides.

This reminds me of all the people that say, “we need to cut costs in healthcare.” The numbers are clear that the US pays too much for the results we’re getting and that the costs of healthcare are a major problem for the US budget and for many large corporations budgets as well. It’s clear why we need to drive healthcare costs down. However, what they don’t say is that lower cost healthcare means that someone is getting paid less. This someone is often the hospitals.

One way you could look at all these efforts to decrease the cost of healthcare is that they are decreasing the demand for the inpatient business. If we have an overcapacity in inpatient healthcare already, these cost cutting measures will likely increase the overcapacity problem even more.

Those aren’t the only things that are driving down the demand for inpatient services. ACOs and value based care will drive the demand for inpatient services down even farther. High deductible plans will force patients to not do inpatient services that they would have done in the past. All of this will work to accentuate the overcapacity problem in inpatient healthcare.

How does a hospital combat the overcapacity problem? One idea is through digital differentiation. In some areas hospitals have a monopoly on services, but even they are competing with the hospital the next town over (even if it’s a 3 hour drive). However, the majority of healthcare organizations work in an environment that is incredibly competitive. Could unique digital services help a hospital be in more demand from patients than their competitors?

Hospitals are going to be around for as long as I’m alive. There’s certain services they offer that you can’t get other places. However, the demand for the services they offer is going to drastically change. How are you approaching this change in demand? Do digital services offer one solution to this problem?

Healthcare Interoperability Pain Points Infographic

Posted on April 27, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

During HIMSS15, MedeAnalytics surveyed over 1,000 attendees on what their biggest pain points with interoperability and found that vendor incompatibility topped the responses. Here’s a breakdown of the barriers:

  • Vendor incompatibility (55%)
  • Budget (18%)
  • Internal resources (16%)
  • Lack of innovation (12%)

They also put out this infographic with the results of the healthcare interoperability survey:
HIMSS Interoperability Pain Point Infographic

Fun Friday Hospital Humor

Posted on April 24, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I thought it would be fun this Friday to share a little humor. Of course, as is usually the case with the best humor, it might hit a little too close to home for some people.

I’m sure nothing like this ever happens in your hospitals.

GE Phasing Out Centricity Enterprise, To Some Surprise

Posted on April 22, 2015 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

Conceding that its competitors have the upper hand, GE is phasing out its Centricity Enterprise product, informing the world in a #HIMSS15 announcement which has gotten little play from our tech media colleagues.  As we’ve argued before, HIMSS is not only a great time to announce big plays, it’s also a great time to bury unpleasant news, and GE seems to have succeeded.

Not surprisingly, employees saw things coming long ago. More than a year ago, for example, a 10-year-plus employee of GE Healthcare called the vendor out on what they saw as low-wattage efforts on company rating site Glassdoor.com. The ex-employee cited a “lack of resources to deliver a good EHR product, [causing] a strong customer base to choose other EHR vendors.”

It’s little wonder that GE is backing out of Centricity Enterprise, which according to a report in MedCity News generated only 5 percent of its EMR revenue, according to Jon Zimmerman, general manager of clinical business solutions. “Is it in the best interest of our customers, shareholders and employees to (be) in a market where competitors are clearly ahead, or should we recognize the situation and go to where the market is going?” Zimmerman told MedCity.

But the fact is, Zimmerman’s comments are somewhat disingenuous. At HIMSS, the company admitted that it had begun the process of dumping Centricity Enterprise three years ago, though it’s not clear how long ago it began to let customers know about its plans. For example, I doubt that Continuum Health Partners CIO Mark Moroses, who as of summer 2013 was moving his organization to the Centricity enterprise EMR, expected to have it phased out less than two years later.

It’s worth wondering why a player with GE’s resources seemingly couldn’t hack the enterprise market. But the problem isn’t new. As far back  as 2011, GE was forced to admit that some of its ambulatory and enterprise customers wouldn’t be able to achieve Meaningful Use with their products. That was probably the beginning of the end for the Enterprise product, which ranked either fifth or sixth in the market recently depending on who you asked. But with Epic alone controlling 15% to 20% of the enterprise EMR market of late, and Cerner hot on its heels, giving up probably was a reasonable response.

The real question is what comes next. If Glassdoor.com posters are any indication, GE Healthcare is prone to frequent strategic changes as management shifts, so who knows what the future holds for its ambulatory Centricity EMR?

At the moment,  it seems that GE is firmly behind its ambulatory product. And that makes sense. After all, physicians are decommissioning their existing EMRs at a frantic rate, and are eager to find substitutes, and that gives GE plenty of sales opportunities. With 70% of physicians unhappy with their EMR, according to a study announced in February of last year, it should be easy pickins.

But given the way GE may have fumbled the ball on the enterprise side, I’d want some proof that leaders there had a long-term commitment to ambulatory care. Practices have a hard enough time finding EMRs that work for them; having to switch for reasons that have nothing to do with them makes no sense.

John Oliver Nails the Patents Discussion

Posted on April 21, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve long had an issue with patents. On the one hand, I agree that we need to protect someone’s efforts to invent something. On the other hand, I’ve seen patent trolls that literally use patents to stifle innovation and put companies out of business. If you aren’t familiar with what’s happening, watch the video of John Oliver below where he describes the patent problem so well.

As more and more hospitals invest in commercializing their research this discussion is going to be very important for these hospitals. It will be interesting to see how this discussion evolves over time. Not to mention the legislation around patents.