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Thoughts On Innovation In Healthcare

Posted on June 30, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

Sure, innovation can be fun and interesting and energizing. But how do you move from innovation as a sport to innovation as a true growth strategy, especially in a conservative business like healthcare? New research by consulting firm PwC might offer some answers.

To conduct its study, P2C surveyed more than 1,200 executives in 44 countries, conducting in-depth interviews with leaders responsible for managing innovation initiatives.

The research, which cut across multiple industries, found that firms that applied customer-engagement strategies leveraging design thinking and user-driven requirements — from idea generation to a product or service launch — saw better results. In fact, they were twice as likely to expect growth of 15% or more over the next five years, PwC found.

In conducting the research, PwC researchers identified five strategies which contribute to effective innovation efforts. They include:

  • Use smart metrics to measure innovation success: Whatever you invest, if you track the benefits of innovation by how it boosts revenue and contains cost – along with building sales – you’ve likely got a sustainable model. Sixty-nine percent of respondents named sales growth as the most important way to measure innovation success.
  • Don’t make “blind bets” — build viable business initiatives: Make sure you find a way to square your innovation strategy with your business strategy. And be aware that doing so may be challenging. The PwC report notes that 65% of companies investing 15% or more of their revenue in innovation saw connecting innovation with business goals was their top strategic challenge.
  • Create silo-busting innovation models: To succeed at innovation, break down traditional organization barriers within and outside of your organization, which helps you leverage a wider pool of ideas, insights, talents and technology. Consider more-inclusive operating models like open innovation, design thinking and co-creation with partners, customers and supplies rather than traditional R&D. Thirty-five percent of PwC respondents reported that customers were their most important innovation partners.
  • Leverage a broad base of human experience: See to it that your innovation teams seek input from across a variety of disciplines, rather than letting technology drive your process. For example, while big data may help you know how customers behave, data alone won’t explain why they behave that way. It’s better to bring the right human judgment and intuition to bear on the data rather than sticking strictly with IT experts. Sixty percent of companies surveyed said that internal employees help to drive innovation within their organization.
  • Support technical innovation: While technology is far from the only tool you can use to innovate, it remains a compelling option. Many companies looking to technology to create markets for novel products and services that don’t yet exist, and to meet needs that customers may not even know they have. Half of PwC’s respondents rated technology partners as their most important innovation collaborators.

So, what can the healthcare industry learn from this study? A few things come to mind.

For one thing, I believe that healthcare leaders could do far more to turn silo-busting activities into group innovation projects. In other words, don’t just merge data from different departments into a common database, involve the people in those departments with the process, and ask them how breaking down barriers could change the organization in a positive way.

Another thing that comes to mind that healthcare technology leaders could stand to integrate non-technical opinions into innovation efforts. Right now, health IT organizations are remarkably siloed themselves, and while they may involve clinicians in their process at times, it’s rare for them to take in the opinions of non-medical employees who don’t use advanced IT functions very often. (Yes, a janitorial services worker may have something to offer.)

And what about picking the right metrics to measure innovation success? Of course, existing models emphasizing clinical improvement aren’t misguided, nor are measures of IT performance, but there’s more to consider. Particularly within the ecosystem of a large hospital, as many departments outside IT care delivery which contribute to the organization’s overall health.

Ultimately, what makes innovation valuable is the extent to which it draws upon an organization’s unique strengths.  But it never hurts to take broad principles like these into account, as they may help you extract the full benefits of the innovation process.

Deriving ROI from Data-driven EMR Clinical Optimization

Posted on June 28, 2017 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Justin Campbell Vice President, Strategy, at Galen Healthcare Solutions.  Learn more about their work by downloading their EHR Clinical Optimization Whitepaper.

Resistance to change is natural. People are uncomfortable with it. Organizations are frightened by it. Acceptance of healthcare information technology took a long time and even in these first two decades of a new century, despite incentives such as the Meaningful Use program, and promises of increased efficiency, implementation of Electronic Medical Records has been a bumpy ride.

Between 2008 and 2016, healthcare organizations spent more than 20 billion dollars adopting electronic health record systems. Many different approaches were applied. Many HCOs decided to act quickly, using what we now call a “Big Bang” fix. Installations of generic systems were in place but users of the new systems were unhappy. In 2013, with the process well underway throughout the nation, two thirds of doctors polled said they used EMR systems unwillingly, with 87% of these aggravated physicians complaining about usability and 92% of physician practices complaining that their EMRs were “clunky” and/or too difficult. Specifically, only 35% reported that it had become easier to respond to patient issues, one third said they could not more effectively manage patient treatment plans, and despite the belief that technology would permit caregivers to spend more time with their patients, only 10% said this was occurring.

The medical side was not alone in expressing dissatisfaction. Hospital executive and IT employees who had replaced their Electronic Health Record systems reported higher than expected costs, layoffs, declining revenues, disenfranchised clinicians and serious misgivings about the benefits gained:

  • 14% of all hospitals that replaced their original EMR since 2011 were losing inpatient revenue at a pace that would not support the total cost of their replacement EMR
  • 87% of hospitals facing financial challenges now regret the decision to change systems
  • 63% of executive-level respondents admitted they feared losing their jobs as a result of the EMR replacement process
  • 66% of the system users believe that interoperability and patient data exchange functionality have declined.


Not all reviews are negative. There is strong support and appreciation for EMRs in some Healthcare Delivery Organizations (HDOs) who believe well-designed EMRs save time and support clinical workflows. But, there is no escaping the majority sentiment: EMRs are not designed for the way providers think and work.

Today, most HDOs are at a crossroads. They can start over with a new EMR or optimize the one they have. The case for a do-over is supported by sub-standard vendor support for their existing systems and the increase in mergers and acquisitions, which drive system consolidation. One fifth of large practices and clinics report they intend to replace their EMRs and studies show that the EMR replacement markets will likely grow at an annual rate of 7%-8% over the next five years. The case for the status quo is made primarily by the HCOs that do not have the financial resources to undertake EMR replacement.

All options face the same key inter-related questions: how to generate additional margin? How to maximize return on technology investments? Which path will best serve the HCO, caregivers and patients?

This is a bit of vicious circle. HCOs are cash-strapped and the transition from fee for service to value-based care exerts downward cost pressures, exacerbating the problem. But patchwork fixes have not resolved that problem. Alternatively, some attempted to do too much too quickly and became frustrated because they lacked the depth of experience and knowledge to perform remediation. And, as KPMG concluded after studying the problem, “The length of time to resolve the issues increased and frustrations mounted as clinical, senior management, IT and human resources staff found themselves spinning their wheels.”

Like a patient being pressured to swallow medicine, HDOs are beginning to accept their situation. According to a recent survey conducted by KPMG in collaboration with CHIME, 38% of 112 respondents ranked EMR/EMR optimization as their top choice for the majority of their capital investments for the next three years.

EMR adoption is already approaching maximum levels. Consequently, healthcare delivery organizations have begun to shift their EMR strategies from short-term clinical documentation data repositories to long-term assets with substantial functionality in support of clinical decisions, health maintenance planning and quality reporting. They are coming to see their IT investments as platforms rather than limited systems of record or glorified data banks. In short, they now understand that the capture of information is only the most basic attribute of an EMR, and that instead, the EMR in which they invest can be flexible and extensible, capable of adopting emerging technologies that are driving insights to the point of care.

Assess opportunity, formulate strategy, improve usability & derive additional ROI & by downloading our EHR Clinical Optimization Whitepaper.

About Justin Campbell
Justin is Vice President, Strategy, at Galen Healthcare Solutions. He is responsible for market intelligence, segmentation, business and market development and competitive strategy. Justin has been consulting in Health IT for over 10 years, guiding clients in the implementation, integration and optimization of clinical systems. He has been on the front lines of system replacement and data migration and is passionate about advancing interoperability in healthcare and harnessing analytical insights to realize improvements in patient care. Justin can be found on Twitter at @TJustinCampbell and LinkedIn.

About Galen Healthcare Solutions

Galen Healthcare Solutions is an award-winning, #1 in KLAS healthcare IT technical & professional services and solutions company providing high-skilled, cross-platform expertise and proud sponsor of the Tackling EHR & EMR Transition Series. For over a decade, Galen has partnered with more than 300 specialty practices, hospitals, health information exchanges, health systems and integrated delivery networks to provide high-quality, expert level IT consulting services including strategy, optimization, data migration, project management, and interoperability. Galen also delivers a suite of fully integrated products that enhance, automate, and simplify the access and use of clinical patient data within those systems to improve cost-efficiency and quality outcomes. For more information, visit www.galenhealthcare.com. Connect with us on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn.

Are You Desensitized to What’s Happening In Your Organization?

Posted on June 26, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

What a great Monday Motivation fron Jake Poore. We’ve all seen what Jake is talking about. Once we get into our daily habits we stop noticing the details of the things around us.

Jake also mentioned Patient Experience in his tweet and becoming desensitized to the patient experience is a great example of what he’s talking about. I remember one CIO telling me that his enemy is the “we’ve always done it this way” culture at his hospital. Someone responding that way is the epitome of someone who has become desensitized to the world around them. Patients suffer when this becomes the modes operandi.

However, this principle goes well beyond just the way we see and interact with patients. It also happens in the way we interact with each other. An organization’s workflows and processes become such a part of their culture that it’s hard to disrupt them. We become desensitized to their weaknesses because they’re the devil we know. Adopting a new technology or a new process that will disrupt our normal processes causes us to wonder what new devils will we discover and do we want to deal with those? The fear of those unknown are often much stronger than the benefits new opportunities can offer us.

I’ve seen many organizations that have become desensitized to the follies of their EHR. Some are dealing with awful workflows and awful setups, but most have given up trying to change it. They no longer feel how awful they are in their lives. They’ve become desensitized to these pains and just consider them part of doing business. How awful is that to consider?

What can we do to overcome these challenges?

The best thing you can do is to get outside of your box and talk to other people. Meeting other people who have different experiences and perspective can reopen your eyes to the things you no longer see. This is why I think EHR user groups are so valuable. You can hear from other people who suffered through the challenges you’re facing and often even find a solution.

With that said, user groups can often be about commiseration as opposed to rectification and solutions. That’s why I think we need a place for true peer connection across EHR vendors. You’d think this would happen at a place like HIMSS, but it usually doesn’t. It’s so large that people flock together in their usual groups.

What do you do to make sure you don’t become desensitized?

The More Hospital IT Changes, The More It Remains The Same

Posted on June 23, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

Once every year or two, some technical development leads the HIT buzzword list, and at least at first it’s very hard to tell whether that will stick. But over time, the technologies that actually work well are subsumed into the industry as it exists, lose their buzzworthy quality and just do their job.

Once in a while, the hot new thing sparks real change — such as the use of mobile health applications — but more often the ideas are mined for whatever value they offer and discarded.  That’s because in many cases, the “new thing” isn’t actually novel, but rather a slightly different take on existing technology.

I’d argue that this is particularly true when it comes to hospital IT, given the exceptionally high cost of making large shifts and the industry’s conservative bent. In fact, other than the (admittedly huge) changes fostered by the adoption of EMRs, hospital technology deployments are much the same as they were ten years ago.

Of course, I’d be undercutting my thesis dramatically if I didn’t stipulate that EMR adoption has been a very big deal. Things have certainly changed dramatically since 2007, when an American Hospital Association study reported that 32% percent of hospitals had no EMR in place and 57% had only partially implemented their EMR, with only the remaining 11% having implemented the platform fully.

Today, as we know, virtually every hospital has implemented an EMR integrated it with ancillary systems (some more integrated and some less).  Not only that, some hospitals with more mature deployments in place have used EMRs and connected tools to make major changes in how they deliver care.

That being said, the industry is still struggling with many of the same problems it did in a decade ago.

The most obvious example of this is the extent to which health data interoperability efforts have stagnated. While hospitals within a health system typically share data with their sister facilities, I’d argue that efforts to share data with outside organizations have made little material progress.

Another major stagnation point is data analytics. Even organizations that spent hundreds of millions of dollars on their EMR are still struggling to squeeze the full value of this data out of their systems. I’m not suggesting that we’ve made no progress on this issue (certainly, many of the best-funded, most innovative systems are getting there), but such successes are still far from common.

Over the longer-term, I suspect the shifts in consciousness fostered by EMRs and digital health will gradually reshape the industry. But don’t expect those technology lightning bolts to speed up the evolution of hospital IT. It’s going take some time for that giant ship to turn.

The Important Role of HIM in Healthcare Cybersecurity – HIM Scene

Posted on June 21, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the HIM Series of blog posts. If you’d like to receive future HIM posts in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

Healthcare organizations that rely on their CSO (Chief Security Officer) to handle cybersecurity in their organizations always annoy me. Cybersecurity requires everyone at the organization to be involved in the effort. One person can have a large influence, but your healthcare organization will never be secure if you don’t have everyone working their best to ensure your organization is secure.

A great example of someone who’s often forgotten in healthcare cybersecurity efforts are HIM professionals. Organizations that do this, do so at their own peril. If you’re not involving your HIM professionals in your cybersecurity efforts, I exhort you to do so today.

One of the best reasons to involve HIM professionals in your security efforts is that they’re often experts on the patchwork of healthcare privacy and security laws. It’s not enough to just ensure you’re being HIPAA compliant. That’s essential, but not sufficient.

Healthcare privacy and security are so important, there are multiple layers of laws trying to protect your health information. Or maybe the laws just aren’t well planned and that’s why we have so many. I’ll let you decide. Either way, in your privacy and security efforts you’re going to need to know HIPAA, HITECH, MACRA, and of course don’t forget the state specific privacy and security laws. No doubt there are more and your HIM professionals are likely some of the people in your organization that knows these laws the best.

Beyond the fact that HIM professionals know the privacy and security laws, HIM professionals are usually well versed in ensuring the right access to the right information in your system. One of the biggest form of breaches is internal breaches from people who were given the wrong permissions on your IT systems.

Making sure someone is auditing and monitoring these permissions is a very important part of your cybersecurity efforts. Plus, don’t forget to have a solid process for removing users when they leave your organization as well. Those zombie user accounts are a ticking time bomb in your security efforts. When your employees verify that their records are in order before they leave with HIM, that might be a good time to remove their access.

Another place HIM professionals can help with healthcare cybersecurity efforts is around information governance. More specifically, HIM can help you properly manage your health data and legacy systems. HIM can ensure that your legacy systems are properly managed until their end of life. No doubt this will be done in tandem with your IT professionals who have to keep these legacy systems secure (not always an easy task). However, an HIM professional can assist with your information governance efforts that impact cybersecurity.

In what other ways can HIM be involved in healthcare cybersecurity?

Cybersecurity is always going to be a team effort. That’s why it’s shocking to me when healthcare organizations don’t involve every part of their team. HIM professionals should step up and make the case for why they should be involved in healthcare’s cybersecurity efforts. However, when they don’t, a great leader will make sure HIM is involved just the same.

If you’d like to receive future HIM posts in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

We Can’t Afford To Be Vague About Population Health Challenges

Posted on June 19, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

Today, I looked over a recent press release from Black Book Research touting its conclusions on the role of EMR vendors in the population health technology market. Buried in the release were some observations by Alan Hutchison, vice president of Connect & Population Health at Epic.

As part of the text, the release observes that “the shift from quantity-based healthcare to quality-based patient-centric care is clearly the impetus” for population health technology demand. This sets up some thoughts from Hutchison.

The Epic exec’s quote rambles a bit, but in summary, he argues that existing systems are geared to tracking units of care under fee-for-service reimbursement schemes, which makes them dinosaurs.

And what’s the solution to this problem? Why, health systems need to invest in new (Epic) technology geared to tracking patients across their path of care. “Single-solution systems and systems built through acquisition [are] less able to effectively understand the total cost of care and where the greatest opportunities are to reduce variation, improve outcomes and lower costs,” Hutchison says.

Yes, I know that press releases generally summarize things in broad terms, but these words are particularly self-serving and empty, mashing together hot air and jargon into an unappetizing patty. Not only that, I see a little bit too much of stating as fact things which are clearly up for grabs.

Let’s break some of these issues down, shall we?

  • First, I call shenanigans on the notion that the shift to “value-based care” means that providers will deliver quality care over quantity. If nothing else, the shifts in our system can’t be described so easily. Yeah, I know, don’t expect much from a press release, but words matter.
  • Second, though I’m not surprised Hutchison made the argument, I challenge the notion that you must invest in entirely new systems to manage population health.
  • Also, nobody is mentioning that while buying a new system to manage pop health data may be cleaner in some respects, it could make it more difficult to integrate existing data. Having to do that undercuts the value of the new system, and may even overshadow those benefits.

I don’t know about you, but I’m pretty tired of reading low-calorie vendor quotes about the misty future of population health technology, particularly when a vendor rep claims to have The Answer.  And I’m done with seeing clichéd generalizations about value-based care pass for insight.

Actually, I get a lot more out of analyses that break down what we *don’t* know about the future of population health management.

I want to know what hasn’t worked in transitioning to value-based reimbursement. I hope to see stories describing how health systems identified their care management weaknesses. And I definitely want to find out what worries senior executives about supporting necessary changes to their care delivery models.

It’s time to admit that we don’t yet know how this population health management thing is going to work and abandon the use of terminally vague generalizations. After all, once we do, we can focus on the answering our toughest questions — and that’s when we’ll begin to make real progress.

Educational EHRs – A Void that Needs to Be Filled?

Posted on June 16, 2017 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

Last week I had my eyes opened to the issue of EHRs in medical education at the #eHealth2017 conference in Toronto. Prior to last week, I had assumed medical schools in North America had incorporated EHRs into their curriculums a long time ago. I learned my lesson (excuse the pun) after attending a breakout session on the use of #HealthIT in medical education.

Lynn Nagel RN, PhD, assistant professor at the University of Toronto in nursing, gave me my first shock when she told the story of how no one raised their hands when she asked her final-year nursing class who had used an actual EHR before. My jaw hit the floor. This would be akin to a class of accountants who had never used a spreadsheet before or computer science majors who had never used a tablet before.

Nagel was not surprised to learn that there simply wasn’t any room for EHR training in the nursing school’s curriculum. Plus, there was a belief by the professors that the healthcare institutions would train these newly minted nurses how to use their EHR.

Later in the session Gurprit Randhawa, Manager of EHR Adoption, Use, Research & Development at Island Health in Victoria BC, told the story of recently graduated physicians who had been given minimal exposure to EHRs (less than 5hrs total).

Randhawa spoke about how she watched these new graduates struggle with actual patient encounters – not knowing whether to face the screen or the patient or both. The new physicians also did not know what to enter in the various fields and were confused over what to record in their clinical notes. Randhawa elicited a round of laughter when she talked about one physician who complained that he thought EHRs all came with a Siri-like interface so that doctors could just dictate their notes to the system.

Later in her presentation Randhawa spoke about how the institution eventually adopted an EHR to help acclimate medical students to the “real world”. They chose an EHR based on the US Vista system and it was well received by medical students.

Randhawa made specific mention of how lucky the medical school was in their choice of EHR. Not only did the vendor provide reliable technical support to the school’s IT department, they also took support calls from students free of charge (and often in the middle of the night before an assignment was due).

Cost, maintenance and support for the EHR are significant considerations for educational institutions, especially given their limited IT resources. Implementing a fully functional EHR is simply not an option.

In the Q&A scrum at the end of the breakout session, I listened to a former medical professor (now consultant) talk about the early days of EHRs and how they used the production system from their institution’s medical center to teach students. Although this provided the advantage of being “real-world”, it was difficult to find actual patient use-cases that matched the clinical criteria they were attempting to teach – partly because EHRs at the time lacked adequate search tools. This professor also mentioned how some of the health records used in class were a bit “too real” as the notes were rife with spelling mistakes, dosages in the notes that didn’t match actual prescribed medications and sometimes personal comments from the attending physicians.

Using actual patient data in an educational setting also raised privacy concerns. I can imagine that in some cases, patients were not made aware that their data could be used in this fashion.

In 2014 a study was published in the American Journal of Medicine that tracked 3rd year medical students and their use of EHRs. The study concluded that there was no correlation between EHR usage and academic performance, however, the early exposure to EHRs was deemed to influence attitudes and habits related to the technology as the students became physicians.

Despite the potential impact of the EHR on educational outcomes, no correlation could be identified between EHR use and clerkship performance. These findings suggest that EHR use habits may be learned early in medical training and certain specialties are more prone to increased screen time. More attention should be directed towards the interface between medical students and the EHR. Their experiences with the EHR during these earlier stages of training are likely to influence attitudes and habits later on as physicians.

One interesting solution to the educational EHR challenge is the Regenstrief EHR Clinical Learning Platform which features more than 11,000 clinically accurate but misidentified medical records. This EHR is the result of a collaboration between the Regenstrief Institute (associated with the Inidana University School of Medicine) and the American Medical Association. This EHR is designed specifically for the education of students.

As with everything in healthcare, the use of EHRs in medical education is a multi-faceted challenge. Although the answer seems obvious (teaching EHRs help prepare students for the reality of healthcare), the implementation of the solution is not straight-forward. Will the vendor support educational institutions and the students themselves? Will the cost to install and maintain the education EHR be within the means of the institution? Will the EHR itself be easy enough for students to use?

That last question was the most memorable moment of the #eHealth2017 breakout session. At the end of Randhawa’s presentation she flashed up a slide with student reactions to using an EHR as part of their course. Take a look at the comment on the right.

Since the goal of education is to prepare students for the real world, a sub-optimal EHR experience is about as real-world as it gets.

A Look Into the Future of HIM with Rita Bowen – HIM Scene

Posted on June 14, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the HIM Series of blog posts. If you’d like to receive future HIM posts in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

One of my favorite people in the HIM world is Rita Bowen. She is currently Vice President, Privacy, Compliance and HIM Policy at MRO, but she has a really impressive HIM resume previous to MRO and a deep understanding of the evolution of HIM and their role in healthcare.

With this experience in mind, I was excited to interview her on the current state of HIM and where HIM is heading in the future. Here are the list of questions I asked Rita if you want to skip to a specific question or you can just watch the full video interview embedded at the bottom of this post.

If you’d like to receive future HIM posts in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

Genomics is Going to Really Blow Up Our Interoperability Issues

Posted on June 12, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today I slipped over to the Precision Medicine Summit in Boston that’s hosted by HIMSS Media. I heard some good speakers which I’ll write about in the future including legal issues related to genomics and gene editing. However, this tweet from the conference really stuck with me:

This is a sad example of the reality of healthcare interoperability today. Healthcare organizations have problems even sharing something as standard and simple as a PDF. Once we have real genomic data and the markers behind them, EHRs won’t have any idea how to handle them. We’ll need a whole new model and approach or our current interoperability problems will look like child’s play.

By the time we figured that out, our proverbial child might be graduating high school.

Talking Secure Healthcare Communication with Telmediq Founder and CEO

Posted on June 9, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve had a keen interest in the secure text message space ever since I started advising a company in the space many years ago. That company has since been acquired, but I’ve still been keeping watch over the secure text message market. Even back in the early days, we knew that the real holy grail of secure text was to integrate with the EHR and other applications and become a full communication suite and not just a simple text message platform. However, it would take time to really get there. What’s exciting is that we’re starting to see companies that are finally getting there.

One company that’s been making great progress in this direction is a company called Telmediq. Unlike most secure text message companies who started with the physicians, Telmediq approached the secure healthcare communication problem initially from the perspective of nurses. This together with a number of their integrations with EHR and other hospital IT systems prompted me to sit down with Ben Moore, Founder and CEO at Telmediq to learn more about their company and the evolving healthcare communication market.

If you’ve never heard about Telmediq or if you’re interested in what’s happening in the healthcare communication space now and where it’s heading in the future, then you’ll enjoy our interview with Ben Moore. We cover a lot of ground including things like EHR integration, voice integration, alert fatigue, hands free communication, and future items we’re just starting to see like AI and chatbots.

Enjoy our interview with Ben Moore, Founder and CEO at Telmediq: