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When Did You Last Job Shadow a Doctor?

Posted on November 4, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit.

My brother is a really good programmer and I always gain a lot of insight into the software and tech world from him when we sit down and talk (which isn’t often since our wives don’t appreciate us enjoying ourselves like that, but I digress). One of the things he told me about developing an application or website is that it’s really hard to know the user’s response to the website. What might seem completely obvious to the maker (designer, programmer, etc), might be completely different from how a new user to the website or application sees it.

This makes common sense once you think about it. When you’re creating the application, you spend so many hours working on it that the layout and location of things are embedded into your brain in a way that it just feels natural to know where to go to find something. New users don’t have this same training embedded into their brain and so they look for very different things.

My brother suggested to me that one of the best ways to solve this challenge is to sit back and watch a user use your program or website. The insights you can glean from the experience are amazing. The great part is that it’s not a hard thing to do either. It takes a little self control to sit back and let them “solve” their problem on their own, but it’s well worth it.

I heard something similar from a CIO at the CHIME Fall Forum last week. They said that they regularly had their tech people shadow a doctor. They then recounted how shadowing a doctor was so valuable since their analysts could see first hand how the workflows they’ve embedded into the system aren’t working effectively for the doctor. You can see first hand how the doctor flips and flops between 3 screens over and over again and how the workflow would be so much more effective on one screen.

You can’t expect your users to report the issues above. First, they are able to accomplish the task, so it doesn’t feel like a system deficiency. Second, they’d have to know that a change like that was possible. Third, most of them are too busy to actually report this type of issue to IT so it can be resolved.

This is why shadowing a doctor (and let me add nurse) is so valuable. You get to see first hand what’s happening and find specific ways you can make your users’ lives better. Plus, it has the added value of showing those doctors and nurses that you care. Sitting in the trenches with these doctors and nurses is a powerful indicator that you want to know what’s going on and care enough to be there with them to see it first hand. Although, don’t ruin that benefit by shadowing the doctor and then doing nothing. Make sure you learn from the experience, make the change, and then communicate the change back to the users.

CMS 68 Percent Settlement Offer Details

Posted on November 3, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit.

I didn’t have a chance to see this presentation at the Craneware Revenue Integrity Summit, but I saw the slides after the event and thought many readers of this site would find them useful (or someone at your organization will find them useful). This is an important decision for every hospital. Hopefully these slides will help you better make the decision.

How Can Organizations Leverage the Increased Specificity of ICD-10 Codes?

Posted on October 30, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit.

Edifecs did a survey of more than 450 healthcare industry representatives to find out how they plan to use the increased specificity of ICD-10 codes. Here are the results of their survey:
ICD10CodedData-01

What do you think of these areas of ICD-10 benefit? How does your organization plan to benefit from ICD-10 coding?

Hospital of the Rising Sun Video – CT Lin, MD at #CHIME14

Posted on October 29, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit.

I always love when a doctor pulls out a guitar (or in this case a ukulele) and sings a healthcare IT parody song. You can see my full list of funny healthcare IT videos. This one is by Dr. CT Lin from Colorado at CHIME 2014:

Looking forward to the CHIME Fall Forum

Posted on October 27, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit.

Tomorrow I’ll be heading to the CHIME Fall Forum. It’s the premiere meeting of healthcare CIOs. I love the opportunity to sit down with CIO’s and talk about what’s happening with them. The event is in San Antonio, so let me know if you’ll be there so we can meet and say hi.

I think the topics are going to be pretty predictable at the event. I’m sure there will be plenty of meaningful use and ICD-10 discussions, but I think that analytics and what they’re doing with it will also be extremely popular. I’m also interested to hear what people are doing as far as security and privacy. Things like the Bash vulnerability were a major deal and I’ll be interested to see if people really dealt with it appropriately. I’m afraid I’ll meet some who ask me what vulnerability I’m talking about. That will be sad, very sad.

What do you think are the hot topics in healthcare IT? I’m interested to know if these hospital CIOs can focus on anything but the regulatory related projects. If they are, I’ll be interested to hear what projects they are taking on next. Are they doing secure text messaging? Are they focused on revenue cycle? What about patient engagement?

The battle to stay on top of everything that’s happening in healthcare IT never ends. I’ll be interested to hear where the battle is heading next. If you have thoughts, I’d love to hear them in the comments.

Just Epic Salary Info Survey

Posted on October 24, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit.

One of our most popular posts was one about Epic Salaries. Although, that was focused on what Epic payed its employees. Many people are interested in what Epic experts are getting paid as full time employees at hospitals or as Epic EHR consultants.

In an effort to better understand what Epic experts can expect to get paid, someone has put together a survey they call JESI (Just Epic Salary Information). I love transparency and so I want to support their efforts to gather as many Epic Salaries as possible. So, if you are an Epic expert, help us out and fill out the quick Epic Salary Information form. Don’t worry. They don’t ask for your contact information, organization name, or anything else.

The other reason I want to support this effort is that all of the aggregate information will be published for free on JustEpicSalary.info. I’ll be interested to see the results of the survey.

Do you know of any other sources of Epic salary information? How do you decide what you pay your Epic experts?

This also reminds me of a recent discussion I had. This hospital CIO told me that they were talking with their doctor about their Epic implementation. The doctor was complaining about how much time they were spending to get Epic working the right way. The doctor asked why some Epic consultants couldn’t just do this for him. Turns out, the doctor was the cheap resource. Having an Epic consultant do it, would have been much more expensive. Doctors don’t hear that very often.

Insightful Healthcare Factoids from Health Catalyst

Posted on October 22, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit.

Who doesn’t like a good set of healthcare IT stats and facts? Obviously, you have to be careful looking at the context of the statistic and how it was collected. However, when done right, you can learn a lot from what Health Catalyst is calling a Healthcare Factoid. They shared a bunch of Factoids during their Healthcare Analytics Summit and then packaged them into a nice slide presentation below.

Which healthcare factoids stand out for you?

How Do You Change the HIPAA Culture of Your Hospital?

Posted on October 20, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit.

Over on EMR and HIPAA, I wrote an article about the “Just Enough” culture of HIPAA compliance. I’m sure that many of you reading this post will be very familiar with this culture. Unfortunately, it’s rampant in so many hospitals across the nation. Even when a few people in the organization are hyper focused on doing more about HIPAA compliance, they’re often stifled by others who want to do just enough.

In response to this post, Christopher Gebhardt, offered these suggestions on when a hospital’s culture has a “funny” way of changing:
– Through the genuine interest of senior executives leading the charge.
– After being slapped with a violation.
– When OCR shows up at your door. The latter defeats the “it can’t happen here” mentality.
– When OCR takes action, repeatedly, for known violations against your competitors.

I think you could define Christopher’s description as a reactionary approach to HIPAA compliance. I think it’s fair to say that along with being a “just enough” culture of HIPAA compliance, healthcare is also very reactionary. There are some notable exceptions to this, but HIPAA and security compliance are very reactionary in most hospitals.

Culture is a hard thing to change at any organization. However, I think we’re entering a new era where a culture of security and compliance is going to be very important to every healthcare organization. With social media, there’s no where to hide any more. An investment in the right hospital security and privacy culture will likely pay off greatly in the long term.

Hospitals and Ebola

Posted on October 17, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit.

It seems like you can’t turn your head anywhere without hearing something about Ebola these days. I heard one TV station in Dallas being called the Ebola news. It’s probably pretty accurate considering it’s been the epicenter of the news coverage. Although, the coverage has seemed to be a little all over the place. In fact, the coverage for Ebola has hit so many places, that I’ve basically avoided almost all of the coverage. I’ve only gotten a little bit of coverage from the sources that I ready regularly. I guess I’ve also seen a few headlines on social media.

With that said, I have dug a little deeper on what’s happened with the EHR and Ebola discussions. Although, that story seems to be even more convoluted and misunderstood than the larger Ebola story. If you want something really valuable (notice the sarcasm font), check out this just released joint statement from the AMA, AHA, and ANA that basically says “We’re working together on it.” If I were a member of any of these organizations, I’d have to consider quitting.

Here’s my short synopsis on what we should know about Ebola:

1. Be thoughtful in how you avoid any communicable disease (Ebola included). That doesn’t mean you have to lock yourself in your house and never go out.
2. We need to get Ebola under control in Africa. If we don’t, then we could have Ebola become a real issue in the US.
3. EHR software can help healthcare professionals identify and track Ebola if configured properly.

There are a number of groups and organizations trying to come together to spread the EHR best practices when it comes to Ebola. I’ll be interested to hear what they find.

Those are my general thoughts on what’s happening. As I said, I’m not an all encompassing expert on the topic. Let’s all share what we know and what we’re doing in the comments.

The Changing Health IT Consulting Job Market

Posted on October 15, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit.

Cassie Sturdevant has a great post up on Healthcare IT Today titled “The New Health IT Consulting Skill Set.” In the post, she talks about the changing Health IT market for consultants. She’s absolutely right that between 2010-2012 it was a white hot market and that the market has since cooled down. As she mentions, that means that clients can be much more selective in who their hire. Then, she outlines a few ways to differentiate yourself as a consultant:

  1. Operations or Clinical Background
  2. Communication Skills
  3. Multi-Faceted Knowledge

Those are some good suggestions and if you read the full article, you can find more details from Cassie on each suggestion. If I were to summarize Cassie’s suggestions, it would be that healthcare organizations will need someone with a much deeper knowledge of EHR and Healthcare IT than they had to have previously.

As I look at the healthcare consulting market going forward, I see two major areas of opportunities: EHR switching and EHR optimization.

EHR Switching – Since the majority of hospitals have now implemented some form of EHR, the new EHR implementation market is drying up. However, that’s not to say that we won’t see a lot of new EHR purchases. These new EHR Purchases will instead be hospitals that are buying a new EHR. This EHR switching takes a lot of effort and skills to do it properly. Plus, it takes an organization that has a deep understanding of both the legacy and new EHR software. Watch for the EHR switching to really spike post-meaningful use.

EHR Optimization – This is a really broad area of work. However, so many of the EHR implementations were done on shortened timelines that almost no EHR optimization occurred during the implementation. This presents a major opportunity. Every organization is going to be looking for ways that they can extract more value out of their EHR investment. Consultants that have deep knowledge about how to get this value will be in high demand.

It’s still an exciting time to be in healthcare IT with lots of opportunities. It’s not the gold rush that it was, but there is still plenty of opportunity to do amazing things with an organization’s healthcare IT.

If you’re looking for a healthcare IT job, be sure to check out these Health IT company job postings:

If your organization is looking for some healthcare IT talent, check out our Healthcare IT central career website.