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Are You Desensitized to What’s Happening In Your Organization?

Posted on June 26, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

What a great Monday Motivation fron Jake Poore. We’ve all seen what Jake is talking about. Once we get into our daily habits we stop noticing the details of the things around us.

Jake also mentioned Patient Experience in his tweet and becoming desensitized to the patient experience is a great example of what he’s talking about. I remember one CIO telling me that his enemy is the “we’ve always done it this way” culture at his hospital. Someone responding that way is the epitome of someone who has become desensitized to the world around them. Patients suffer when this becomes the modes operandi.

However, this principle goes well beyond just the way we see and interact with patients. It also happens in the way we interact with each other. An organization’s workflows and processes become such a part of their culture that it’s hard to disrupt them. We become desensitized to their weaknesses because they’re the devil we know. Adopting a new technology or a new process that will disrupt our normal processes causes us to wonder what new devils will we discover and do we want to deal with those? The fear of those unknown are often much stronger than the benefits new opportunities can offer us.

I’ve seen many organizations that have become desensitized to the follies of their EHR. Some are dealing with awful workflows and awful setups, but most have given up trying to change it. They no longer feel how awful they are in their lives. They’ve become desensitized to these pains and just consider them part of doing business. How awful is that to consider?

What can we do to overcome these challenges?

The best thing you can do is to get outside of your box and talk to other people. Meeting other people who have different experiences and perspective can reopen your eyes to the things you no longer see. This is why I think EHR user groups are so valuable. You can hear from other people who suffered through the challenges you’re facing and often even find a solution.

With that said, user groups can often be about commiseration as opposed to rectification and solutions. That’s why I think we need a place for true peer connection across EHR vendors. You’d think this would happen at a place like HIMSS, but it usually doesn’t. It’s so large that people flock together in their usual groups.

What do you do to make sure you don’t become desensitized?

The More Hospital IT Changes, The More It Remains The Same

Posted on June 23, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

Once every year or two, some technical development leads the HIT buzzword list, and at least at first it’s very hard to tell whether that will stick. But over time, the technologies that actually work well are subsumed into the industry as it exists, lose their buzzworthy quality and just do their job.

Once in a while, the hot new thing sparks real change — such as the use of mobile health applications — but more often the ideas are mined for whatever value they offer and discarded.  That’s because in many cases, the “new thing” isn’t actually novel, but rather a slightly different take on existing technology.

I’d argue that this is particularly true when it comes to hospital IT, given the exceptionally high cost of making large shifts and the industry’s conservative bent. In fact, other than the (admittedly huge) changes fostered by the adoption of EMRs, hospital technology deployments are much the same as they were ten years ago.

Of course, I’d be undercutting my thesis dramatically if I didn’t stipulate that EMR adoption has been a very big deal. Things have certainly changed dramatically since 2007, when an American Hospital Association study reported that 32% percent of hospitals had no EMR in place and 57% had only partially implemented their EMR, with only the remaining 11% having implemented the platform fully.

Today, as we know, virtually every hospital has implemented an EMR integrated it with ancillary systems (some more integrated and some less).  Not only that, some hospitals with more mature deployments in place have used EMRs and connected tools to make major changes in how they deliver care.

That being said, the industry is still struggling with many of the same problems it did in a decade ago.

The most obvious example of this is the extent to which health data interoperability efforts have stagnated. While hospitals within a health system typically share data with their sister facilities, I’d argue that efforts to share data with outside organizations have made little material progress.

Another major stagnation point is data analytics. Even organizations that spent hundreds of millions of dollars on their EMR are still struggling to squeeze the full value of this data out of their systems. I’m not suggesting that we’ve made no progress on this issue (certainly, many of the best-funded, most innovative systems are getting there), but such successes are still far from common.

Over the longer-term, I suspect the shifts in consciousness fostered by EMRs and digital health will gradually reshape the industry. But don’t expect those technology lightning bolts to speed up the evolution of hospital IT. It’s going take some time for that giant ship to turn.

The Important Role of HIM in Healthcare Cybersecurity – HIM Scene

Posted on June 21, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the HIM Series of blog posts. If you’d like to receive future HIM posts in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

Healthcare organizations that rely on their CSO (Chief Security Officer) to handle cybersecurity in their organizations always annoy me. Cybersecurity requires everyone at the organization to be involved in the effort. One person can have a large influence, but your healthcare organization will never be secure if you don’t have everyone working their best to ensure your organization is secure.

A great example of someone who’s often forgotten in healthcare cybersecurity efforts are HIM professionals. Organizations that do this, do so at their own peril. If you’re not involving your HIM professionals in your cybersecurity efforts, I exhort you to do so today.

One of the best reasons to involve HIM professionals in your security efforts is that they’re often experts on the patchwork of healthcare privacy and security laws. It’s not enough to just ensure you’re being HIPAA compliant. That’s essential, but not sufficient.

Healthcare privacy and security are so important, there are multiple layers of laws trying to protect your health information. Or maybe the laws just aren’t well planned and that’s why we have so many. I’ll let you decide. Either way, in your privacy and security efforts you’re going to need to know HIPAA, HITECH, MACRA, and of course don’t forget the state specific privacy and security laws. No doubt there are more and your HIM professionals are likely some of the people in your organization that knows these laws the best.

Beyond the fact that HIM professionals know the privacy and security laws, HIM professionals are usually well versed in ensuring the right access to the right information in your system. One of the biggest form of breaches is internal breaches from people who were given the wrong permissions on your IT systems.

Making sure someone is auditing and monitoring these permissions is a very important part of your cybersecurity efforts. Plus, don’t forget to have a solid process for removing users when they leave your organization as well. Those zombie user accounts are a ticking time bomb in your security efforts. When your employees verify that their records are in order before they leave with HIM, that might be a good time to remove their access.

Another place HIM professionals can help with healthcare cybersecurity efforts is around information governance. More specifically, HIM can help you properly manage your health data and legacy systems. HIM can ensure that your legacy systems are properly managed until their end of life. No doubt this will be done in tandem with your IT professionals who have to keep these legacy systems secure (not always an easy task). However, an HIM professional can assist with your information governance efforts that impact cybersecurity.

In what other ways can HIM be involved in healthcare cybersecurity?

Cybersecurity is always going to be a team effort. That’s why it’s shocking to me when healthcare organizations don’t involve every part of their team. HIM professionals should step up and make the case for why they should be involved in healthcare’s cybersecurity efforts. However, when they don’t, a great leader will make sure HIM is involved just the same.

If you’d like to receive future HIM posts in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

We Can’t Afford To Be Vague About Population Health Challenges

Posted on June 19, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

Today, I looked over a recent press release from Black Book Research touting its conclusions on the role of EMR vendors in the population health technology market. Buried in the release were some observations by Alan Hutchison, vice president of Connect & Population Health at Epic.

As part of the text, the release observes that “the shift from quantity-based healthcare to quality-based patient-centric care is clearly the impetus” for population health technology demand. This sets up some thoughts from Hutchison.

The Epic exec’s quote rambles a bit, but in summary, he argues that existing systems are geared to tracking units of care under fee-for-service reimbursement schemes, which makes them dinosaurs.

And what’s the solution to this problem? Why, health systems need to invest in new (Epic) technology geared to tracking patients across their path of care. “Single-solution systems and systems built through acquisition [are] less able to effectively understand the total cost of care and where the greatest opportunities are to reduce variation, improve outcomes and lower costs,” Hutchison says.

Yes, I know that press releases generally summarize things in broad terms, but these words are particularly self-serving and empty, mashing together hot air and jargon into an unappetizing patty. Not only that, I see a little bit too much of stating as fact things which are clearly up for grabs.

Let’s break some of these issues down, shall we?

  • First, I call shenanigans on the notion that the shift to “value-based care” means that providers will deliver quality care over quantity. If nothing else, the shifts in our system can’t be described so easily. Yeah, I know, don’t expect much from a press release, but words matter.
  • Second, though I’m not surprised Hutchison made the argument, I challenge the notion that you must invest in entirely new systems to manage population health.
  • Also, nobody is mentioning that while buying a new system to manage pop health data may be cleaner in some respects, it could make it more difficult to integrate existing data. Having to do that undercuts the value of the new system, and may even overshadow those benefits.

I don’t know about you, but I’m pretty tired of reading low-calorie vendor quotes about the misty future of population health technology, particularly when a vendor rep claims to have The Answer.  And I’m done with seeing clichéd generalizations about value-based care pass for insight.

Actually, I get a lot more out of analyses that break down what we *don’t* know about the future of population health management.

I want to know what hasn’t worked in transitioning to value-based reimbursement. I hope to see stories describing how health systems identified their care management weaknesses. And I definitely want to find out what worries senior executives about supporting necessary changes to their care delivery models.

It’s time to admit that we don’t yet know how this population health management thing is going to work and abandon the use of terminally vague generalizations. After all, once we do, we can focus on the answering our toughest questions — and that’s when we’ll begin to make real progress.

A Look Into the Future of HIM with Rita Bowen – HIM Scene

Posted on June 14, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the HIM Series of blog posts. If you’d like to receive future HIM posts in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

One of my favorite people in the HIM world is Rita Bowen. She is currently Vice President, Privacy, Compliance and HIM Policy at MRO, but she has a really impressive HIM resume previous to MRO and a deep understanding of the evolution of HIM and their role in healthcare.

With this experience in mind, I was excited to interview her on the current state of HIM and where HIM is heading in the future. Here are the list of questions I asked Rita if you want to skip to a specific question or you can just watch the full video interview embedded at the bottom of this post.

If you’d like to receive future HIM posts in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

Genomics is Going to Really Blow Up Our Interoperability Issues

Posted on June 12, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today I slipped over to the Precision Medicine Summit in Boston that’s hosted by HIMSS Media. I heard some good speakers which I’ll write about in the future including legal issues related to genomics and gene editing. However, this tweet from the conference really stuck with me:

This is a sad example of the reality of healthcare interoperability today. Healthcare organizations have problems even sharing something as standard and simple as a PDF. Once we have real genomic data and the markers behind them, EHRs won’t have any idea how to handle them. We’ll need a whole new model and approach or our current interoperability problems will look like child’s play.

By the time we figured that out, our proverbial child might be graduating high school.

Talking Secure Healthcare Communication with Telmediq Founder and CEO

Posted on June 9, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve had a keen interest in the secure text message space ever since I started advising a company in the space many years ago. That company has since been acquired, but I’ve still been keeping watch over the secure text message market. Even back in the early days, we knew that the real holy grail of secure text was to integrate with the EHR and other applications and become a full communication suite and not just a simple text message platform. However, it would take time to really get there. What’s exciting is that we’re starting to see companies that are finally getting there.

One company that’s been making great progress in this direction is a company called Telmediq. Unlike most secure text message companies who started with the physicians, Telmediq approached the secure healthcare communication problem initially from the perspective of nurses. This together with a number of their integrations with EHR and other hospital IT systems prompted me to sit down with Ben Moore, Founder and CEO at Telmediq to learn more about their company and the evolving healthcare communication market.

If you’ve never heard about Telmediq or if you’re interested in what’s happening in the healthcare communication space now and where it’s heading in the future, then you’ll enjoy our interview with Ben Moore. We cover a lot of ground including things like EHR integration, voice integration, alert fatigue, hands free communication, and future items we’re just starting to see like AI and chatbots.

Enjoy our interview with Ben Moore, Founder and CEO at Telmediq:

How Many Platforms Does Each Hospital Own?

Posted on June 2, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I was recently thinking about how nearly every healthcare IT company I talk to today has some sort of platform. Yes, even our beloved EHR vendors (or not so beloved) often talk about their EHR system as an EHR platform. Is there anything that’s implemented in healthcare IT today that’s not a platform? Everything seems to be a platform these days.

If they have hundreds of health IT systems, then they have hundreds of platforms.

Given this is the case, are they really all platforms? Do we need all of these platforms? Has the word platform just been corrupted and really doesn’t have any meaning any more?

I wonder if hospital CIOs now would be interested in purchasing a piece of healthcare IT software that wasn’t a platform. Would it be better to market a healthcare IT software product as a solution rather than a platform? I’m guessing that most hospital CIOs probably feel like they have plenty of platforms. Am I wrong?

I should be clear. I think the idea of creating a platform with something is a good thing. At least it’s a good thing if you define a platform as something that connects and integrates with other systems and software. This would be a good trend in healthcare since so many so called platforms were at best very closed platforms and at worst not platforms at all. If platform would be defined as being open and interoperable, then I would welcome all these platforms with open arms.

The problem is that I think many healthcare IT vendors (EHR vendors leading this charge) look at their platform as a way to entrench the customer with them. They want to create the end all be all platform that all of a hospital’s future healthcare IT purchases need to integrate with the hospital. This is where the platform idea can fall flat when it comes to health IT customers and patients.

I love a good platform as much as the next person. It’s a powerful way to do business and can really do amazing things to improve the care a patient receives and how efficient a healthcare organization can operate. However, once everything says their a platform it loses meaning. I think we’ve reached that point with the word platform.

Promoting Internal Innovation to Drive Healthcare Efficiency

Posted on June 1, 2017 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Peyman S. Zand, Partner, Pivot Point Consulting, a Vaco Company.

Technical innovation in healthcare has historically been viewed through the lens of disruption. As tech adoption in the industry matures, perceptions on the origin of innovation are evolving as well. Healthcare leadership teams are increasingly leaning on feedback from the front lines of care delivery to identify ways to eliminate waste and drive greater efficiency. Rather than leaving innovation up to third parties, many health organizations are formalizing programs to advance innovation within their own facilities.

There are two schools of thought on healthcare innovation. Some argue that the market’s unique challenges can only be understood by those in the field, leaving outside influencers destined to fail. Others view innovation success in outside markets as an opportunity for healthcare stakeholders to learn from the wins and losses of more technically progressive industries. By mimicking other industries’ approach to promoting innovation (as opposed to their byproducts) in our hospitals and health systems, healthcare can draw from the best of both worlds. What we know is that the process in which innovation is adopted is very similar in all industries. However, the types of innovations and specific models can and should be tailored to the healthcare industry.

Innovation in Healthcare: Three Examples at a  Glance

There are several examples of health organizations successfully forging a path to institutionalized innovation. University of Pittsburg Medical Center (UPMC), Intermountain Healthcare and Mayo Clinic have pioneered innovation programs that merge internal clinical expertise with technical innovators from vertical markets in and outside healthcare. This article highlights some of the ways these progressive organizations have achieved success.

Innovation at UPMC

UPMC Enterprises boasts a 200-person staff managed by top provider and payer executives at UPMC. The innovation team is presently engaged in more than a dozen commercial partnerships, including support for Vivify Health’s chronic care telehealth solutions, medCPU’s real-time decision support solutions and Health Catalyst’s data warehousing and analytics solutions. Each project is focused on the goal of improving patient outcomes. The innovation group was recently rumored to be partnering with Microsoft on machine learning initiatives and the results may have a profound impact on how we use technology in care delivery.

UPMC Enterprises supports entrepreneurs—both internal individuals and established companies—with capital, technical resources, partner networks, recruiting and marketing assistance to support innovation. Dedicated focus in the following areas lends structure to the innovation program:

  • Translational science
  • Improving outcomes
  • Infrastructure and efficiency
  • Consumer engagement

All profits generated from investments are reinvested to support further research and innovation.

Innovation at Intermountain Healthcare

Like UPMC, Intermountain’s Healthcare Transformation Lab supports innovation in the areas of telehealth and natural language processing (NLP), among others. Like most providers, one of Intermountain’s primary goals is controlling costs. The group’s self-developed NLP program is designed to help identify high-risk patients ahead of catastrophic events using data stored in free-text documents. Telehealth innovations let patients self-triage to the right level of care to incentivize use of the least expensive form of care available. Intermountain’s ProComp solution offers its providers on-the-spot transparency about the cost of instruments, drugs and devices they use. That innovation alone net the health system roughly $80 million in reduced costs between 2013 and 2015.

Most of Intermountain’s innovation initiatives are physician led or co-led. The program strives for small innovations in day-to-day work, supported by a suite of innovation support services and resource centers. Selected innovations from outside startups are supported by the company’s Healthbox Accelerator program involvement, while internal innovations are managed by the Intermountain Foundry. Intermountain offers online innovation idea submissions to promote easy participation. The health organization’s $35 million Innovation Fund supports innovations through formalized investment criteria and trustee governance resources. It is important to note that Intermountain Healthcare is interested in all aspects of innovation including supply chain and other non-clinical related projects.

Innovation at Mayo Clinic

Mayo Clinic’s Center for Innovation (CFI) brings in innovation best practices from both healthcare and non-healthcare backgrounds to drive new ideas. The innovation team’s external advisory council is comprised of both designers and physicians to drive innovation and efficiency in care delivery. The CFI features a Multidisciplinary Design Clinic that invites patients into the innovation process as well.

CFI staff found it was essential to show physicians data that demonstrated known problems and how proposed innovations could make a difference to their patients. They emphasize temporary changes, or “rapid prototyping,” to garner physician buy-in. Mayo’s CFI promotes employee involvement in innovative design through its Culture & Competency of Innovation platform, which features weekly meetings, institution-wide classes, lunch discussion groups and an annual symposium. Mayo’s innovation efforts include these additional physician-led platforms:

  • Mayo Clinic Connection—supporting shared physician experience
  • Prediction and Prevention
  • Wellness—promoting patient education
  • Destination Mayo Clinic—focused on improving patient experience

While these innovation examples represent large healthcare organizations, fostering innovation does not require a big budget. Mayo Clinic’s “think big, start small, move fast” approach to innovation illustrates a common thread among successful innovation programs. Here are practical strategies to advance innovation in healthcare, regardless of organizational size or budget.

Four Steps to Implementing an Innovation Program in Your Organization

Innovation doesn’t have to be grandiose or expensive. Organizations can start small. Begin by opening a companywide dialogue on innovation and launching a simple, online idea submission process to engage personnel in your organization. The most important part of this process is educating your teams to understand how to evaluate new innovations against a relatively pre-defined set of criteria.  For example, are you trying to improve patient safety, quality of care, reduce cost, increase patient or physician satisfaction, etc.

Another key element of successful innovation is encouraging collaboration and participation across a wide variety of stakeholders. Cross-functional teams bring multifaceted perspectives to the problem-solving process. Strive for incremental gains in facilitating opportunities for cross-department collaboration in your organization. This is particularly important for the implementation step.

Measure success using performance metrics where clinical efficiencies are concerned. Physician satisfaction, while difficult to quantify, can also pose big wins. You can expect some failures, but stack the odds by learning from other departments, organizations and industries to avoid making the same mistakes.

To work, innovation must happen often and organically. Dedicate funding, establish cross-department teams and build a formal process for vetting internal ideas. Consider offering staff incentives to drive engagement. Not all ideas will succeed. Identify metrics that will help determine ROI (not all ROIs are measured in dollars) on pilot programs so you can weed out initiatives that aren’t delivering early on to protect resources. Also, keep in mind that you can improve these innovations at each iteration.  Make the process iterative and roll out the initiatives quickly. If it fails, shut the process down quickly and move on. If it is successful, improve it for the next iteration and scale it quickly to maximize the benefits.

Whether you’re cross-pollinating internal teams to promote innovation, building partnerships with other organizations or leveraging technology to better connect providers and patients, healthcare’s ability to successfully collaborate is vital to advancing innovation in healthcare.

About Peyman S. Zand
Peyman S. Zand is a Partner at Pivot Point Consulting, a Vaco company, where he is responsible for strategic services solving healthcare clients’ complex challenges. Currently serving as interim regional CIO for Tenet Healthcare, Zand was previously a member of the University of North Carolina Healthcare System, leading Strategy, Governance, and Program/Project Management. He oversaw major initiatives including system-wide EHR implementation, regulatory programs, and physician practice rollouts. Prior to UNC, Zand formed the Applied Vision Group, a firm dedicated to assisting healthcare organizations with strategic planning, governance, and program and project management for key initiatives.

Zand holds a Bachelor’s of Science in Computational Mathematics and Engineering from Michigan State University, and a Master of Business Administration from the University of Michigan.

Epic EHR Switching Video from Mary Washington Healthcare (MWHC)

Posted on May 26, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re back with another Fun Friday video (and a bonus story) to prepare you for the weekend. This week’s Fun Friday video comes from Mary Washington Healthcare (MWHC) doing a parody of a Hamilton song, “Right Hand Man,” as part of their switch to Epic. The production quality is really quite amazing and I love the choice of Hamilton. Check it out:

Now for a fun little story. I showed one of these EHR go-live videos to the Healthcare IT and EHR course I taught in Dubai. The majority of attendees were from Saudia Arabia with a few from Kuwait and UAE.

Well, the attendees loved the video. I asked them how well creating a video like this would go over in their hospitals. They all laughed and shook their heads. Certainly, the cultures are quite different. However, I did find it interesting that just as many people in the middle east were taking selfies as the US. Maybe the human desire isn’t all that different.

I don’t expect any of my students in the workshop to do anything like the above video. However, the concept of bringing your team together in an effort like what it takes to create this video is a powerful idea that could be applied regardless of culture.