Free Hospital EMR and EHR Newsletter Want to receive the latest news on EMR, Meaningful Use, ARRA and Healthcare IT sent straight to your email? Join thousands of healthcare pros who subscribe to Hospital EMR and EHR for FREE!

Why Might Intermountain Have Chosen Cerner Over Epic?

An anonymous person on HIStalk gave some really interesting insights into Intermountain’s decision to go with Cerner instead of Epic.

Re: Intermountain. The short-term choice (three or so years) would have been Epic, but we went with Cerner because of Epic’s dated technology, Cerner’s openness, and the feeling that we would be more of a partner than a customer with Cerner. The partnership is more than words. We’re working closely with Cerner and their horde of sharp, dedicated people on the implementation. We have some pieces they don’t and those are being built into the Cerner system, while some of our own development efforts have been redirected since Cerner already has that functionality. The first rollout is scheduled for December and I think it will go well due to the way the teams are working together. Unverified.

This is the best analysis of Intermountain’s decision to go with Cerner that I’ve seen. As in every billion dollar procurement decision, it’s always got other nuances and pieces that go into the decision making process. However, the above analysis gives us a good place to start.

Let’s look at the main points that are made:

1. Is Epic technology more dated than Cerner?

2. Is Cerner more open than Epic?

3. Will Cerner be more of a partner than Epic would have been?

I’d love to see Judy’s (Epic CEO’s) comments on all of these. I’m sure she’d have a lot to say about each of them. For example, you may remember that Judy described Epic as the most open system she knows. Ask someone who wants to get Epic certified if they’re open. Ask a health IT vendor that wants to work together if Epic is open. Ask even some of their smaller customers who want to do things with Epic if Epic is open. They’d all likely disagree that Epic is the most open system.

I’d love to hear people’s thoughts on each of these three points. I think it will make for a really lively discussion that will help us get closer to understanding the reality of these assertions.

However, reality aside, I can tell you that the public image of Epic vs Cerner certainly confirms all three of these points. Whether Intermountain indeed used these points as part of their decision process or not, I don’t know. What I do know is that it wouldn’t surprise me at all if they did think this way since there are many in the market that believe and share all of the above three impressions.

July 14, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

Siemens to Sell Hospital IT Business?

This is some interesting news for the hospital health IT world:

Siemens (SIE) AG is exploring a sale of its hospital database and information-technology unit to focus on energy and industrial businesses, according to two people familiar with the plans.

The German engineering company is evaluating options for the business, and no final decision has yet been made, said the people, who asked not to be identified because the considerations are private. The unit could be valued at more than 1 billion euros ($1.4 billion), said one of the people.

Siemens Chief Executive Officer Joe Kaeser is seeking to focus Siemens around “electrification, automation and digitalization” and has already sold off $2.3 billion euros since late 2012. It seems like Siemens healthcare product line fits great with the digitalization focus, so there’s likely more to the story. My guess is the Siemens healthcare business hasn’t been doing well (Thank you Cerner and Epic) and so he’s looking to get out while there’s still some value in the business.

If you’re a Siemens healthcare customer, you probably welcome this change as well. Hopefully a sale will infuse the company and the product with a new energy that will produce some better results for their customers. Maybe I’m talking to the wrong people, but those I’ve met on Sorian are basically ho-hum about the product. No doubt it will be interesting to watch.

July 9, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

AHA urges agencies to speed up EMR choice expansion

In a move that shouldn’t surprise anybody, the American Hospital Association is urging CMS and the ONC to hurry up and finalize new rules which would expand choice for certified EMRs.

The AHA letter argues that its members are on the verge of walking away from Meaningful Use. But if CMS and the ONC speed ahead with with the new proposed rules — which would offer more choice in specific meaningful use requirements they must meet this year — hospitals will be much better equipped to proceed.

Why the rush? Well, for one thing, the letter argues, time is of the essence for hospitals, which have to decide their meaningful use strategy for fiscal 2014. If they must make choices before the new rule is finalized, it could cause them “significant financial and operational harm,” the AHA contends.

Meanwhile, if the agencies don’t push these rules through quickly, “many providers are likely to conclude that they cannot meet meaningful use this year and abandon the program,” wrote Linda Fishman, AHA senior vice president of public policy analysis and development, in a letter to CMS Administrator Marilyn Tavenner and National Coordinator Karen DeSalvo, MD.

The letter also takes on other issues. It asks that CMS and ONC clarify the rules implementation, offer more flexibility in the reporting of clinical quality measures, shorten the MU reporting period for 2015 in analyze lessons learned from Stage 2 before finalizing Stage 3′s start date, according to HealthcareITNews.

The AHA’s letter comes at a challenging time for the meaningful use program generally, which has of late attracted broader attention than it has in the past.

Not only are industry groups pressuring ONC, legislators are too. For example, at a recent health IT conference, U.S. Rep Tom Price, MD, R-GA, argued that meaningful use is “maybe not even doing what needs to be done as it relates to patients and physicians.”

In his remarks, Price argued that meaningful use could be improved by keeping the patient front and center, making sure patients know they own their health data and establishing an interoperability standard.  But he suggests that because the MU program roadmap was laid out in the HITECH Act, it’s not as fluid as it should be and doesn’t accommodate such concerns.

The reality, however, is that there is no simple way to get interoperability; right now, we’re lucky if individual EMRs meet providers’ needs.  Despite the demands from other stakeholders, health IT vendors still have a lot more to gain by creating islands rather than interoperable products.

June 23, 2014 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies.

Georgia EMR Disaster: Was IT Department Responsible?

A few weeks ago, heads began to roll at Georgia’s Athens Regional Health System when its $31 million Cerner rollout began to fall apart. After clinicians complained that a rushed rollout process was generating a host of medication errors and other mistakes, President and CEO James Thaw resigned, and less than a week later, SVP and CIO Gretchen Tegethoff left as well.

Since then, however, the political landscape there has changed, with the facility’s chief medical officer, as well as Cerner executives, contending that the disaster was due to mistakes by the health systems IT team, according to HealthcareITNews. The Cerner execs, CMO and others are arguing that IT leaders made strategic decisions that should’ve been made by clinicians, the publication says.

A local paper, the Athens Banner Herald, notes that the Cerner rollout was done largely by the hospital’s IT team, and that few end-users were involved. That, at least, is what Cerner VP Michael Robin told the paper.  And a different Cerner VP, Ben Himes, took another shot at the IT department, arguing that this implementation seems to have come out on the IT side of things, rather than stressing clinical involvement.

The bottom line seems to be that regardless of what actually happened, the clinicians at the hospital seem to of felt left out of the process, never good thing when we’re dealing with a tool that they’ll need to use everyday.  Regardless of what actually happened, it seems the hospital’s IT department didn’t do a good job of engaging clinicians and getting their feedback; under those circumstances, the likelihood of kicked up a fuss even if implementation was otherwise smooth.

On the other hand, I’m always a little skeptical when vendors point fingers at their customers and say it was their fault when things go wrong. OK, I realize that there may be some truth to their accusations, and that Cerner has a right to defend itself, but it’s hardly a good PR move to dump problems with the implementation completely in the customer’s lap.

The truth is, will probably never know exactly what happened with this EMR implementation. Considering the scale of the project, and the number of people involved, it’s inevitable that this will go down in a blaze of finger-pointing. But it never hurts to be reminded that EMR implementations which leads physicians feeling as though they’re on the sidelines are politically risky at best, and potentially disastrous at worst.

 

June 18, 2014 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies.

The Best Thing For Epic Might Be to NOT Win the DoD Contract

For those not familiar with the Department of Defence (DoD) EHR contract that’s being bid on right now, check out our post about the $11 billion EHR contract. Yes, you’re reading that right. That’s $11 billion with a B. I believe that would be the largest single EHR contract ever (I believe Kaiser was $4 billion to start).

Needless to say, this is an enormous contract that will make some outside companies very rich. I can’t even imagine what $11 billion of EHR consultants and software would look like. That’s a lot of EHR jobs to go around, but I digress.

Most people in the industry seem to believe that Epic is the front runner in the race. Considering the number of large deals that Epic has won, Epic winning the DoD EHR contract would be a safe bet. Although, I wonder if the best thing for Epic would be for them to not win the DoD contract.

Sure, Epic would take a short term PR hit if someone else like Cerner wins the DoD contract. You can already predict the press headlines talking about the fall from power as Epic loses to Cerner (similar to when Cerner won the Intermountain deal over Epic). That would have some damage to Epic’s reputation, but not really. It’s not like any other hospital in the US thinks that their contract would be anything like the DoD EHR contract. In fact, many of the hospitals purchasing Epic EHR will be grateful that Epic resources aren’t being tied up on a new $11 billion contract while their “small” $100 million EHR project languishes.

Indeed, the best thing for Epic might be for it to NOT win the DoD EHR contract. Let’s remember that Epic has a really good history of successful EHR implementations. Sure, there are a few examples where the Epic implementation hasn’t gone so well. However, I think the general view of the industry is that Epic implementations generally go well. In fact, there are stories of Epic contracts so stringent that when an Epic implementation starts to go bad, Epic comes in and takes over to make sure that the implementation goes well.

Long story short, Epic has the best reputation of any hospital EHR vendor when it comes to successful EHR implementations (especially large ones). Epic winning the DoD EHR contract could do a lot to tarnish that reputation.

One might argue that if Epic’s successful with the $11 billion DoD EHR contract, that it will be a boon to their current reputation. That’s fair, but the DoD EHR implementation would be unlike most other EHR implementations. First, the DoD doesn’t have a sterling reputation for successful healthcare software projects. That will likely become an issue for anyone who wins the contract. Second, we’re talking about a government entity with layers of red tape and bureaucracy. A small company like Epic (small in government contractor terms) isn’t going to carry the same weight as they usually do in their other hospital EHR implementations. Epic, the control company, won’t be able to control the DoD EHR project the same way they usually do.

One could use the same argument I used above about why even if Epic gets the DoD contract and fails, it won’t tarnish their reputation since hospitals realize that the DoD is unique. However, the difference between losing a bid and a failed $11 billion project is very different. The failed DoD EHR bid will be covered once and then generally forgotten. A failed $11 billion contract can carry on for years as timelines are delayed, budget overruns are reported, discontent leaks out, he said-she said occurs, and the media churns and speculates on what’s happening with the DoD EHR project.

We all think that winning an $11 billion contract would be great. Indeed, that’s a lot of money and would be an enormous win worth celebrating. The only question is how long will the celebration continue? If I’m Epic, I wouldn’t be too sad if I didn’t win the contract. In the long term, it might be for the best.

June 2, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

First Hand Perspective on Meditech EHR

The following was an interesting and insightful first person customer response to my post about Meditech EHR. These comments are from an IS Director and current user of Meditech.

As someone who’s worked with Meditech systems for a number of years I’d offer the following observations/opinions:

1. They don’t charge enough to make the charts that measure success in terms of revenue.

2. If success were measured in number of clients they would lead the pack with over 25% of the US EMR market and over 40% of the Canadian.

3. They are considered a ‘small’ hospital product by the general EMR community. Thus, ‘big’ hospitals tend to ignore them. Too bad. They scale nicely.

4. They don’t advertise heavily. Word of mouth seems to be their go-to model.

5. They have an ugly UI. However, they get the job done reasonably well.

Like most EMR vendors they have their share of problems of course. They need to be more responsive to their customers. They need to spend more time consider work-flow rather than expecting customers to bend their practices around the system. They need to retain talent longer. Hiring fresh graduates from BC and then losing them to the consulting world a couple of years later is really annoying for customers.

What are your thoughts on Meditech? I look forward to reading more perspectives in the comments.

May 19, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

A Meaningful EHR Certification

In many ways this post could be considered a continuation of my previous post on data liberation. I’ve really loved the idea of a creating a meaningful EHR Certification and that could include data liberation. Let’s be honest for a minute. Do any of you find value in the current EHR certification?

You know that a certification is screwed up when it requires certain interoperability standards and then when you go to actually implement the sharing of data between two systems you find out that the two systems are working on two different standards. They are close standards, but close doesn’t count with standards. Many have asked the question, “What did the EHR certification do if it couldn’t test the standard?” I have no answer to that question.

Now imagine we created an EHR certification that actually did require a standard for interoperability. Not a flavor of a standard, or something that closely resembles a standard. I’m talking about a standard. Would hospitals find this useful? I think so.

Another example of a meaningful EHR certification could be certifying that an EHR vendor will not hold your EHR data hostage. Think about how beneficial that would be to the industry. Instead of EHR vendors trying to trap your data in their system, they could focus on providing the end user what they need so the end user never wants to leave that EHR. What a beautiful shift that would be for our industry.

There could be many more things that could be meaningfully certified. However, this would be a simple and good place to start. I have no doubt that some would be resistant to this certification. That’s why those who do become meaningfully certified need to get the proper boost in PR that a meaningful certification should deserve. No EHR vendor wants to be caste as the EHR vendor who can’t figure out the standard and that holds its customers hostage. Yet, that’s what they’re able to get away with today.

What do you think of this idea?

April 16, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

Cerner Agrees To Pay $106M Over Allegedly Defective Software

After years of back and forth, Cerner has settled a dispute with a North Dakota hospital claiming that Cerner’s financial software was defective and didn’t deliver expected business benefits.

Back in April 2012, Trinity Health told the vendor that it was transitioning away from Cerner’s patient accounting software solution and certain IT services provided by Cerner. At the time, it alleged that the patient accounting solution didn’t work right.  Of course, Cerner disputed the allegations, according to its 10-K yearly report.

The two players began arbitration in December 2013, a move which allowed Cerner to collect some payments due from the hospital.  At the outset, Cerner was predicting liability you of up to $4 million, while Trinity anticipated damages totaling $240 million.

Ultimately, the two agreed upon a settlement under which Cerner would pay Trinity $106 million. Interestingly, Trinity is continuing as a client of Cerner for its clinical solutions, something you might not expect under the circumstances.

This is a particularly unusual outcome for a vendor/hospital dispute, because most vendor contracts contain clauses to eliminate “consequential damages,” which limit hospital’s ability to take legal action, notes Trinity attorney Michael Dagley. That being said, there are areas under state and common law provisions of consumer fraud statutes, under which manufacturers cannot misrepresent product capabilities and benefits.

Knowing how hard it is for a hospital to sue a vendor of IT services, it makes you wonder whether the growing number of hospitals dumping their current EMR are doing so because they’re not getting what they want but can’t sue to get their money back.  While it may be heinously expensive, buying a new EMR and installing it is certainly faster than going through years of court proceedings and then having to buy another EMR nonetheless.

March 12, 2014 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies.

2013 Hospital EHR and Health IT Trends

There are a number of amazing milestones and trends happening with EHR and Healthcare IT. I think as we look back on 2013, we’ll remember it for a number of important changes that impact us for many years to come. Here are a few of the top trends and milestones that I’ll remember in 2013.

Epic and Cerner Separate Themselves – This has certainly been happening for a couple of years, but 2013 is the year I’ll remember that everyone agreed that for big hospitals it’s a two horse race between Cerner and Epic. There’s still an amazing battle brewing for the small hospital with no clear winner yet. However, in the large hospital race the battle between Cerner and Epic is on. Epic had been winning most of the deals, but Cerner just gave them a big left hook when Intermountain chose Cerner.

I expect we’re living in an Epic and Cerner world until at least a few years post meaningful use. The job listings on Healthcare IT Central illustrate Cerner and Epic dominance as well.

Near Universal EHR Adoption in Hospitals – I can’t find the latest EHR adoption (meaningful use) numbers from ONC, but the last ones I saw were in the high 80′s. That basically leaves a number of small rural hospitals that likely don’t have much tech infrastructure at all, let alone an EHR. Every major hospital institution now has an EHR. I guess we can now stop talking about hospital EHR adoption and start talking about hospital EHR use?

The Cracks in the Healthcare Interoperability Damn Appear – Interoperability has always been a hard nut to crack in healthcare. Everyone knew it was the right thing to do, but there were some real systemic reasons organizations didn’t go that direction. Not to mention, there was little financial motivation to do it (and often financial disincentive to do it).

With that background, I think in 2013 we’ve started to see the cracks in the damn that was holding up interoperability. They are still just cracks, but once water starts seeping through the crack the whole structure of the damn will break and the water will start flowing freely. Watch for the same with interoperability. Some of this year’s cracks were started with the announcement of CommonWell. I think in response to being left out of CommonWell, Epic has chosen to start being more interoperable as well.

Skinny Data Happens – I was first introduced to the concept of skinny data vs big data at HIMSS 2013 by Encore Health Resources. While I’m not sure if the skinny data branding will stick, the concept of doing a data project with a slice of data that has meaningful (excuse the use of the word) outcomes is the trend in data analytics and it’s going to dominate the conversations going forward.

As I posted on EMR and EHR, Big Data is Like Teenage Sex, but skinny data is very different. Skinny data is about doing something valuable with the data. Sadly, not enough people are doing skinny data, but they all will in 2014.

Hospitals Ignore Consumer Health Devices – Consumer health devices are popping up everywhere in healthcare. We’re quickly reaching the point that consumers can monitor all of their vital information at near hospital grade quality using their smartphone and sometimes an external device. This is a real revolution in medical devices. Many are still making their way through FDA approval, but some have passed and are starting to work on traction.

With all of this innovation, hospitals seemed to have mostly ignored what’s happening. Sure, the larger ones have a few pilot projects going. However, most hospitals have no idea what’s about to hit them upside the head. Gone will be the days of patients going to the hospital to be “monitored.” I don’t think most hospitals are ready for this shift.

December 31, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

Kaiser Permanente Branch Joins Epic Network

Though it apparently held out for a while, Kaiser Permanente Northern California has signed on to Epic Systems’ Care Everywhere, a network which allows Epic users to share various forms of clinical information, Modern Healthcare reports.

Care Everywhere allows participants to get a wide range of patient data, including real-time access to patient and family medical histories, medications, lab tests, physician notes and previous diagnoses. The Care Everywhere network debuted in California in 2008, and has since grown to a national roster of more than 200 Epic users.

Many of the state’s major healthcare players are involved, including Sutter Health, as well as prominent regional players such as Stanford Hospital and Clinics, USCF Medical Center and UC Davis Health System, according to Modern Healthcare. Kaiser Permanente Southern California also participates in the network.

According to Epic, the Care Everywhere system allows patients to take information with them between institutions whether or not both institutions use the Epic platform. Information can come from another Epic system, a non-Epic EMR that complies with industry standards, or directly from the patient.

But of course, the vendor likes to see Epic-to-Epic transmission best, as it notes on the corporate site: “When an Epic system is on both sides of the exchange, a richer data set is exchanged and additional conductivity options such as cross-organization referral management are available.”

Care Everywhere also comes with Lucy, a freestanding PHR not connected to any facility’s EMR system. According to Epic, Lucy follows patients wherever they receive care, and gathers data into a single source that’s readily accessible to clinicians and patients. Patients can enter health data directly into Lucy or upload Continuity of Care Documents from other facilities.

While connecting 200+ healthcare organizations together is a notable accomplishment, Care Everywhere is not going to end up as the default national HIE matter how hard Epic tries. As long as the vendor behind the HIE (Epic) has a strong incentive to favor one form of data exchange over another, it cuts down the likelihood that you’ll have true interoperability between these players. Still, I’ve got to admit it’s a pretty interesting development. Let’s see what healthcare organizations have to say that try to work with Care Everywhere without owning an Epic system.

P.S. It’ll also be interesting to see whether Epic is actually “best” for ACOs, as a KLAS study of a couple of years ago suggested. More recent data suggests that best-of-breed tools will be necessary to build an ACO, even if your organization has taken the massive Epic plunge.

December 26, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies.