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Integrating Patient Experience Information Into Your Workflow

Posted on February 18, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’m absolutely intrigued by today’s announcement that Walgreens Pharmacy has integrated PatientsLikeMe data into their pharmacy website. This is the first time PatientsLikeMe has ever integrated their community’s information into a third party website. I think this is a groundbreaking move towards the integration of patient experience information into a wide variety of portals for patients and healthcare providers.

It’s no surprise that a patient facing company like Walgreens is the first to integrate this type of patient generated data. Most healthcare institutions are no doubt leery of patient generated data like this and so they’ll likely be very reticent to integrate this into their systems. However, I think this is a sign of where the integration of patient data is going.

I think the first place we’ll see these type of integrations in healthcare organizations is in the patient portals. I know of many hospitals that have been working to create a kind of PatientsLikeMe experience for their patients. You can see how these efforts could be bolstered by integrating some of the PatientsLikeMe data into their efforts. I’m not sure how much PatientsLikeMe has really opened up their data, but this move tells me that they’re interested in that idea.

So far I’ve only mentioned patient facing integrations. The next step to consider is integrating PatientsLikeMe data into an EHR. Take a look at the image below (click for full size image) to see the PatientsLikeMe integration with Walgreen’s pharmacy website:

It’s not that hard to imagine a similar interface with the PatientsLikeMe data alongside the ePrescribing fields. I’ll leave the discussion of whether this is a valuable integration or not to the doctors. However, PatientsLikeMe is just one example of many that are likely to come. Eventually that data could be genomic data that influences the drug being prescribed. Eventually that data could be “grand rounds” style data that informs a doctor of how his colleagues are prescribing the drug.

As we think through all these data possibilities, it’s easy for me to see that many of these things are not going to be offered by the EHR. So, EHR vendors need to make sure that they get really good at integrating with third party software and data providers. This needs to become a core capability of every EHR vendor.

I’m excited by the possibilities that these types of integrations will bring. What do you think of these integrations? Are they coming? What opportunities are available? Is my vision wrong? Let me know in the comments.

Five Signs You Need a New HIE Solution

Posted on February 17, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve written a lot about the new EHR switching market. EHR implementation software has become quite mature and so we’re entering a new world where new EHR sales are going to come from hospitals switching EHR software. Yes, there are a few hospital EHR stragglers out there, but the majority of new EHR sales are going to come from switching.

While I’d seen this coming in the EHR market for a while, I hadn’t carried that over to the HIE market as well. In this case, I’m really referring to a private HIE that a hospital might employ versus a third party HIE provider. Is the HIE market in a similar “switching” market like EHR? I’d love to hear your thoughts on this.

This question came to mind when I found this eBook called, Five Signs You Need a New HIE Solution. It’s a free download if you want to check out the whole eBook. The 5 signs it suggests are worth some discussion:

  1. My data sharing solution isn’t meeting my needs, but the thought of replacing it is painful.
  2. My technology is old. We need an architectural update.
  3. I can’t access or share my data when I need to.
  4. I can’t make changes to my HIE solutions without my current vendor’s involvement. Plus, they take too long and charge too much.
  5. I don’t feel confident that my current HIE partner is well equipped to handle healthcare’s changes, challenges, and uncertainties.

It’s amazing how universal these signs are with any software. This list could have applied to EHR software as much as HIE. In the eBook, they discuss each of these in more detail. I’m sure that many of these issues resonate with readers.

As I look through this list, I wonder if switching software is the only way to solve the problem. I think in most cases the answer is that switching is the only solution. The reason many don’t switch is fear. Plus, that fear is exacerbated by colleagues from other organizations who have switched their system and not seen an improvement. That’s why so many organizations stick with The Devil You Know for much longer than they should. Hopefully the above list of signs will help people who are going through this evaluation. Just make sure that if you do need to switch HIE or other software that you take the time to make sure your new software won’t suffer the same issues.

Is Apple HealthKit Headed For Hospital Dominance?

Posted on February 12, 2015 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

Even for a company with the cash and reach of Apple, crashing the healthcare party is quite an undertaking.  Not only does healthcare come with unique technical challenges, it’s quite the conservative business, in many cases clinging to old technologies and approaches longer than other data-driven industries.

Of late, however, Apple’s HealthKit has attracted the attention of some high-profile healthcare institutions, such as New Orleans-based Ochsner Medical Center and Stanford Healthcare. All told, a total of fourteen major U.S. hospitals are running trials of HealthKit. What’s more, more than 600 developers are integrating HealthKit tech into their own health and fitness apps.

What’s particularly interesting is that some of these healthcare organizations are integrating Apple’s new patient-facing, iOS HealthKit app with Epic EMRs and the HealthKit enterprise platform.  If this works out, it could vault Apple into a much more lucrative position in the industry, as bringing together health app, platform and EMR accomplishes one of the major steps in leveraging mobile health.

According to MobiHealthNews, the new app allows patients to check out test results, manage prescriptions, set appointments, hold video visits with Stanford doctors, review medical bills — and perhaps most significantly, upload their vital signs remotely and have the data added to their Epic chart. This is a big step forward for hospitals, but even more so for doctors, many of whom have warned that they have no time to manage a separate stream of mobile patient data as part of patient care.

For Apple leaders, the next step will be to roll out the upcoming Apple Watch and integrate it into its expanding Internet of Apple Healthcare Things. CEO Tim Cook is pitching the Apple Watch as a key component in promoting consumer health. While the iPhone gathers data, the smart watch will proactively remind consumers to move. “If I sit for too long, it will actually tap me on the wrist to remind me to get up and move, because a lot of doctors think sitting is the new cancer,” Cook told an audience at an investor conference recently.

All that being said, it’s not as though Apple is marching through healthcare corridor’s unopposed. For example, Samsung is very focused on becoming the mobile healthcare  technology provider of choice. For example, in November, Samsung announced relationships with 24 health IT partners, including Aetna, the Cleveland Clinic and Cigna.

At its second annual developer conference last December, Samsung introduced an array of software tools designed to support the buildout of a digital health ecosystem, including the Samsung Digital Health SDK and Gear S SDK, which lets app makers create software compatible with Samsung’s smart watches. Also, Samsung is already on the second generation of its Simband reference design for wearable device design, as well as the cloud-based Samsung Architecture for Multimodal Interactions, which collects sensor data.

And Microsoft, of course, is not going to sit and watch idly as a multibillion-dollar market goes to competitors. For example, late last year the tech giant launched a fitness tracking wristband and mobile health app. It’s also kicked off a HealthKit-like platform, imaginatively dubbed Microsoft Health, which among other things, allows fitness band users to store data and transfer it to the Microsoft Health app. Microsoft isn’t winning the PR war as of yet — Apple still has a gift for doing that — but have no doubt that it’s lurking in the swamps like an alligator, ready to close its powerful jaws on the next right opportunity to expand its healthcare presence.

Bottom line, Apple has captured some big-name pilot testers for its HealthKit platform and related products, but the game is just beginning. Having users in place is a good start, but Apple is miles away from being able to declare itself the leader in the emerging hospital mobile health market.

BIDMC’s Internal EHR and A Possible Epic Future

Posted on February 11, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of the surprising reactions for me in the announcement of Athenahealth’s acquisition of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center’s (BIDMC) in house webOMR platform was by John Halamka. As I mention in the linked article, it really isn’t a pure software acquisition as much as it is Athenahealth going to school to learn about the inpatient EHR space. However, John Halamka’s reaction to this announcement is really interesting.

As I read through all of the coverage of the announcement, John Halamka seems to have shifted gears from their current in house EHR approach to now considering a switch to some other external EHR vendor. This is very interesting given this blog post by John Halamka back in 2013. Here’s an excerpt from it:

Beth Israel Deaconess builds and buys systems. I continue to believe that clinicians building core components of EHRs for clinicians using a cloud-hosted, thin client, mobile friendly, highly interoperable approach offers lower cost, faster innovation, and strategic advantage to BIDMC. We may be the last shop in healthcare building our own software and it’s one of those unique aspects of our culture that makes BIDMC so appealing.

The next few years will be interesting to watch. Will a competitor to Epic emerge with agile, cloud hosted, thin client features such as Athenahealth? Will Epic’s total cost of ownership become an issue for struggling hospitals? Will the fact that Epic uses Visual Basic and has been slow to adopt mobile and web-based approaches provide to be a liability?

Or alternatively, will BIDMC and Children’s hospital be the last academic medical centers in Eastern Massachusetts that have not replaced their entire application suite with Epic?

Based on John Halamka’s comments it seems that his belief might have changed or at least he’s considering the option that an in house system is not the right approach moving forward. No doubt Athenahealth is hoping that they’ll delay the decision a few years so they have a chance to compete for BIDMC’s business.

If you look at the rest of the blog post linked above, Halamka was making the case for Epic back in 2013. I think that clearly makes Epic the front runner for the BIDMC business at least from Halamka’s perspective. We’ll see how that plays out over time.

It seems like we’re nearing the end of the in house EHR hospital. Are there any others that still remain?

Will Cerner Let Mayo Clinic Move to Epic Easily?

Posted on February 9, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As most regular readers know, we don’t try to get into the rat race of breaking news on things like EHR selection, the latest meaningful use, or whatever else might be time sensitive healthcare news. Sure, every once in a while we’ll report something we haven’t seen or heard other places, but we’re more interested in the macro trends and the broader insight of what various announcements mean. We don’t want to report on something happening, but instead want to tell you why something that happened is important.

A great example of this is Mayo Clinic’s decision to go with Epic and leave behind Cerner, GE, and other systems. There’s a good interview with Mayo Clinic CEO, Cris Ross, that talks about Mayo’s decision to go with Epic. As he says in the interview, GE Centricity wasn’t part of their future plans, and so they were really deciding between Epic and Cerner. Sad to see that Vista wasn’t even part of their consideration (at least it seems).

Based on Cris Ross’ comments, he commented that he liked Epic’s revenue cycle management and patient engagement options better than Cerner. Although, my guess is that they liked Epic’s ambulatory better than Cerner as well since they were going away from GE Centricity. Cris Ross’s double speak is interesting though:

As we looked at what met our needs, across all of our practices, around revenue cycle and our interests around patient engagement and so on, although it was a difficult choice, in the end it was a pretty clear choice that Epic was a better fit.

Either it was a difficult choice or it was a pretty clear choice. I think what Cris Ross is really saying is that they’d already decided to go with Epic and so it was a clear choice for them, but I better at least throw a dog bone to Cerner and say it was a hard choice. Reminds me of the judges on the voice that have to choose between two of their artists. You know the producers told them to make it sound like it’s a hard choice even if it’s an easy one.

Turns out in Mayo’s case they probably need to act like it was a really hard choice and be kind to Cerner. Mayo has been a Cerner customer for a long time and the last thing they want to do is to anger Cerner. Cerner still holds a lot of Mayo’s data that Mayo will want to get out of the Cerner system as part of the move to Epic.

I’ll be interested to watch this transition. Will Cerner be nice and let Mayo and their EHR data go easily? Same for GE Centricity. I’ve heard of hundreds of EHR switches and many of them have a really challenging time getting their data from their previous EHR vendor. Some choose to make it expensive. Others choose to not cooperate at all. Given Mayo’s stature and the switch from Pepsi to Coke (Cerner to Epic, but I’m not sure which is Pepsi and which is Coke), I’ll be interested to see if Cerner lets them go without any issues.

I can’t recall many moves between Epic and Cerner and vice versa. Although, we can be sure that this is a preview of coming attractions. It will be interesting to see how each company handles these types of switches. What they do now will likely lay the groundwork for future EHR switching.

Rate of Adoption of Healthcare and mHealth Chart

Posted on February 6, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The people over at ClinicSpectrum recently shared this interesting chart with me on Twitter:
Rate of Adoption of Healthcare IT and mHealth

My immediate response to it was that it needed to be shifted 2 years. If you make 2013=2015 and so forth, then I think the chart is pretty accurate and interesting. As I look at it again now, I also think that the appointment scheduling might be a little larger than reality as well.

Nitpicking aside, I think it illustrates an interesting movement that we see happening in healthcare IT. EHR is basically implemented. A few patient services like appointment scheduling are making good progress. Many organizations have started opening up electronic messaging to patients and patient access to records.

Of course, that all leaves the next frontier of healthcare IT: quality monitoring and preventive engagement. You could probably expand that into a few more areas, but at its core it’s all about improving the care that’s provided. This is the most exciting part of what we’re doing in healthcare IT and will be the next 5-10 year challenge. I’m excited to see the results.

Athenahealth Going to Inpatient EHR School

Posted on February 4, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In case you missed it, Athenahealth announced a collaboration with Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and the purchase of their webOMR platform. This comes on the heels of Athenahealth’s acquisition of RazorInsight’s inpatient EHR. Here’s a short video where Jonathan Bush and John Halamka talk about the acquisition:

When you dig into the details of the acquisition, you realize that Athenahealth isn’t going to sell the webOMR software. They’ve purchased the right to be able to copy what’s been built into that EHR software and no doubt bake it into the RazorInsights software. Plus, they’ll have the people at BIDMC providing feedback and guidance as Athenahealth builds out a full inpatient EHR platform that can compete with Epic and Cerner. Jonathan Bush makes it clear that it’s going to take a couple years to make this full vision come to pass, but he believes building it on the right technology will make all the difference as they go after the inpatient EHR market.

I have to admit that I think KLAS got it right when they said that this deal is really about Athenahealth going to inpatient EHR school:

No doubt this was also a way for Athenahealth to get into BIDMC in order to sell their ambulatory software. As part of the deal they’re starting the rollout of Athenahealth ambulatory EHR to a few of their clinics. It will be interesting to hear how that goes since it will say a lot about how the future BIDMC partnership will go for Athenahealth. No doubt, Athenahealth is going to throw all of its resources at the implementation to make sure they’re a success.

This move by Athenahealth is a big one and fraught with risk. It combines the complicated hospital environment with an existing software base and the acquisition of another software base as they integrate a third software base’s experience into a new platform for inpatient EHR. Yeah, nothing could go wrong with that mix. Of course, in a high stakes game of poker when there’s a lot of risk, there’s a lot of reward. Jonathan Bush and Athenahealth have pushed their chips all in. We’ll see the final card in about 2-3 years.

Cerner Completes Acquisition of Siemens Health Services

Posted on February 2, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As we first wrote about back in August 2014, Cerner Has Acquired Siemens and today the acquisition is complete. Here’s a quote from Neal Patterson, Cerner Chairman CEO and Co-Founder, about the acquisition:

“By combining client bases, investments in R&D and associates, we are in a great position to lead clients through one of the most dynamic eras in health care,” said Neal Patterson, Cerner chairman, CEO and co-founder. “Cerner remains focused on key development areas including population health, physician experience, open platforms, revenue cycle and mobility. We see these as critical areas of investment to ensure providers can meet growing regulatory demands and control costs, while continuing to improve quality of care.”

This note on Cerner revenue and client base was quite interesting: “Cerner expects revenue in 2015 to be approximately $4.8 billion to $5 billion, with a client base spanning more than 30 countries across more than 18,000 facilities.” For those keeping track at home, the purchase price for the acquisition was $1.3 billion plus working capital adjustments.

We wrote previously about John Glaser staying on at Cerner. Cerner has committed to supporting and advancing the Soarian platform for at least the next decade. Although, that’s not a surprise since it will probably take a decade for the Soarian licenses to come up for renewal so they can move them to the Cerner platform.

Give it 3-4 years and you’ll see why Soarian is not likely to be a long term option for organizations. It’s expensive to support 1 platform, let alone two. Cerner will be doing the minimum necessary on Soarian and integrating new revenue streams into it. Otherwise, I can’t imagine they’ll do anything great with it.

The next couple years are going to get really interesting as the two heavyweights battle it out: Cerner and Epic. Although, I thought Neal’s areas of interest for Cerner were interesting: population health, physician experience, open platforms, revenue cycle and mobility. I’d love to sit down with him and talk about what they’re really doing in these areas. Especially around open platforms.

Finding Epic Customers

Posted on January 27, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

If you haven’t had a chance to read the Life After Epic blog, go and check it out. I’ve referenced it a few times and should probably do a whole series like they did on the 13 Epic Principles. They’ve also covered interesting topics like Epic and the Non-Compete and an Epic Severance Agreement.

I was particularly interested in the most recent post about how to find Epic customers. Once someone’s non-compete is over with Epic, it’s good to know which hospitals and organizations are available to those with Epic experience. As the owner of Healthcare IT Central, I’d be remiss if I didn’t also point you to this list of Epic Jobs. However, depending on where you live or where you’d like to live, it might be helpful to know what hospital organizations have implemented Epic.

In the article linked above, they offer an interesting way to figure this out:

One…comment on a nursing blog said this:
“you can download an app in your iphone “mychart” it will show you the states that have EPIC program”

The MyChart app is available on Android now, and it lists each organization by the state that they serve.

If it’s full time work you want, start your job search with a trip to the app store of your choice.

I like the creative way to find out where Epic is installed. I imagine that not all 100% of Epic users are on MyChart, but thanks to meaningful use I bet it’s pretty close.

Scribe Criticism is Unwarranted

Posted on January 26, 2015 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Michael Murphy, MD CEO of ScribeAmerica.
Michael Murphy
It is clear there is a major amount of tension around the cumbersome technology associated with most electronic health records (EHRs). Unfortunately, some are blaming the technology’s limitations on the ever-popular Medical Scribe. Many have gone as far as to insinuate the use of medical scribes is the reason why technology is not developing quickly to resolve EHR problems – this is like saying that citizens paying their taxes are to blame for the government not seeking to balance the budget and exercise appropriate fiscal control. Can you honestly believe that the small minority of providers who find EHR acceptable due to scribes are what is preventing EHR companies from making improvements? No, it is a result of system and technology limitations.

A more comprehensive understanding of the scribe industry is needed instead of blaming them for the problems facing EHRs. Importantly, the scribe industry has developed over the years to improve patient care, protect the sacred provider/patient relationship and help to prevent physician burn out. Statements that The Joint Commission (TJC) cannot regulate or monitor scribes, are analogous to saying the local police department has no control over a city. There will always be “bad actors” willing to act outside of accepted industry norms, however, that does not mean that the TJC does not have control over the Scribe industry.

A few recent, ill-informed articles have recently circulated about Medical Scribes and it is only a matter of time before other writers rely on the incomplete information and slanted view of the article when gathering information on the topic. This will result in a continuous cycle of blaming scribes for a variety of shortcomings in the medical field beyond the original intended topic of the need for advancement in EHR technology.

Articles that improperly suggest a scribe would document services that were not performed to increase patient billing only serve to take focus away from any medical providers that may engage in fraudulent billing practices. Scribes do not share in revenues received from the physician’s practice and would have no reason to falsify services to increase revenues. Any concern over billing patient’s for services that were not provided should be directed at the medical provider who engages in such practice. Instead, the use of scribes will hopefully deter such unethical practices by physicians in the future as they will no longer be entering the information into a medical record with no one around to see what they are doing or question them on their actions. A scribe will act as a check and balance in the system by documenting only the services that are provided.

What about the providers who work sans scribe and document a full H&P and never took their stethoscope out of their pocket and only conversed with the patient once all the labs and CT results are back? Again, these providers are a minority in the grand scheme of things but to infer that adding a scribe into the equation increases the risk of chart copying or excessive over documentation is completely unfounded. If anything, the scribe adds an extra layer of accountability for the provider who might otherwise be tempted to ride the line of integrity due to the downward pressure by administration to see more patients faster and with greater quality.

The use of EHRs may have increased the demand of medical scribes recently, but there are many other factors that have contributed to the increase. Physicians went to medical school for four years and completed their residency programs to treat patients, not to become secretaries. Physicians truly want to engage their patients, take care of them and not be hamstrung with meaningful use, ICD­10, PQRS, or Core measures.

In the future scribes can assist with population health management data collection, which will free physicians to provide much needed patient education and will be vital to the solvency of Accountable Care Organizations. Additional pressure on physicians comes from falling reimbursements, which are forcing everyone to do more with less, an impending physician shortage and smaller health insurance networks. This all adds up to physician burnout, which is the primary driver of increased medical scribe utilization, not EHRs. Burnout has been reported nationally and will continue to increase if physicians do not seek assistance. Patients seek treatment with physicians based on their medical knowledge and skills, not based upon their data entry skills or knowledge of technology. Patients want to be treated with respect, which includes being seen promptly and being able to converse face to face with their physician while discussing their health concerns instead of being ignored while the physician is focusing on the data entry instead of the symptoms. The use of a scribe will allow the physician to focus on the patient and will most likely be in a better mood than the physician who is frustrated that his time is spent on data entry and not practicing medicine.

I applaud anyone in their desire to see EHR technology advance and improve, but suggest that more research be done on the topic instead of misplacing blame on the scribe industry just to publish an article on the topic. Collectively, we can and need to address the shortcomings of current EHR solutions and the resulting physician burnout.

Michael Murphy, MD CEO of ScribeAmerica
ScribeAmerica is a provider of medical scribes to hospitals and medical practices. Co-founders Michael Murphy and Luis Moreno met in 2002 and founded ScribeAmerica the following year in Lancaster, California. ScribeAmerica is the largest independent scribe company and they are committed to helping improve patient care by doing what we do best, continue to save doctors – one. click. at. a. time.