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Why Are We Still Talking About Cloud in Healthcare?

Posted on January 8, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today’s post come from some tweets:


And here’s a great response from CIO David Chou:


I find it really interesting that he added mobile. Most hospitals realize that cloud has to be part of their IT strategy. Every hospital has some sort of cloud solution that they support. However, in the hospital EHR world, is there a viable cloud EHR option for hospitals?

On the other hand, mobile EHR is really lacking. Certainly there is a lot of mobile use in healthcare, but not for most of the enterprise applications.

I really hope that the tweet at the top is wrong. Healthcare needs to be doing a lot more than just cloud and mobile. Those should just be features and not trends. Here’s the unfortunate reality though:

Gathering Consensus for EMR Templates

Posted on January 6, 2016 I Written By

Erin Head is the Director of Health Information Management (HIM) and Quality for an acute care hospital in Titusville, FL. She is a renowned speaker on a variety of healthcare and social media topics and currently serves as CCHIIM Commissioner for AHIMA. She is heavily involved in many HIM and HIT initiatives such as information governance, health data analytics, and ICD-10 advocacy. She is active on social media on Twitter @ErinHead_HIM and LinkedIn. Subscribe to Erin's latest HIM Scene posts here.

By now, most of us have moved beyond the initial phases of implementing an EMR and into the optimization phase. Templates, ordersets, and documentation tools are constantly evolving with input from different departments and clinicians but we need to ensure a centralized EMR change review process is in place to prevent duplication, errors, note bloat, conflicting information, and unnecessary documentation.

Since there are many different uses and objectives for clinical documentation, we must collaborate with many different areas to reach a consensus on the way we capture clinical documentation to ensure compliance. In my experience, the best way to standardize EMR changes and enhancements is to develop a centralized process flow for all requests for changes to clinical documentation. This establishes the team that will provide diverse perspectives and will review and sign-off on all requests before they are built and implemented.

Sometimes we get approached by physicians or other clinicians asking for changes that would be a simple build in the EMR but we must run this and all requests through the change approval process to prevent any potential downstream affects. Even when requests are based on regulatory changes, it’s important to follow the process flow so that all interested parties are aware of the changes and are meeting compliance in all areas.

From the coding and CDI perspective, we need to capture more detail in the documentation to properly assign ICD-10 codes. Adjusting EMR templates to help physicians with descriptive diagnoses is vital to capture all of the detail at the point of entry and time of treatment instead of asking for clarification later. At my facility, we have found success with having our CDI specialists educating the physicians on the diagnosis guidelines and appropriate EMR template use.

The number one objective should be to ensure the EMR captures the clinical story of each patient to provide the best possible treatment and utilization of resources. Achieving consensus on templates can sometimes feel like herding cats but doing it right the first time is important. We must maintain a governance process of clinical documentation to ensure all objectives are properly met.

If you’d like to receive future HIM posts by Erin in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

Epic EMR Costs Drag Down Finances At Brigham and Women’s

Posted on January 4, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

It’s worth noting from the outset that many healthcare organizations have had it worse. Epic installs have blown health system budgets sky high, sapped their profitability and undermined their credit ratings. So upon hearing the following you may not be tempted to play a sad song on the world’s smallest violin.

Still, it’s worth noting that in part due to the costs of its Epic implementation, the venerable Brigham and Women’s Hospital will fall $53 million short of its expected $121 million surplus for fiscal 2015. According to news reports, this is the first time Brigham and Women’s has missed such a target in more than 10 years.

The hospital’s president, Betsy Nabel, MD, noted that the Brigham and Women’s install is part of a massive $1.2 billion Epic implementation cutting across the 10 hospitals of the Partners HealthCare system. The broader Partners implementation is proving to be a budget-buster as well. Three years ago, Partners went into the effort with a comparatively scant $600 million budget.

Brigham and Women’s — along with nearby Dana-Farber Cancer Institute — hired 1,500 extra staff members to help with the Epic go-live, which took place in June of this year. The Brigham had budgeted $47 million during the previous year to pay for the transition costs.

But the transition cost $27 million more than expected. For one thing, once they began using the EMR, Brigham and Women’s staff apparently undercoded a bunch of visits, lowering patient care revenues.  The hospital also gave up some revenue voluntarily, by cutting back on patient volume during the first months post-go-live to ease the transition.

The rest of the shortfall came from lost patient volume in February due to heavy snowfall, as well as paying more than it had expected into its employee pension fund.

A few words of commentary seem called-for here.

* It’s not clear to me why the staffers made so many coding mistakes going out the door with the new install. I’ve written about perhaps a dozen Epic installs in depth, and have studied many more, and a rash of post-implementation coding mistakes doesn’t seem to be common. Am I missing something, or were the staffers undertrained?

* News reports suggest that nearly $14 million of the unexpected costs came from the planned reductions in patient care volume. It seems to me that if Brigham and Women’s execs planned for that shortfall, they’d know how much it was going to be. Why all of the surprise already?

By the way, the shortfall apparently kicked up so much dust that Dame Judy personally flew out to Boston to meet with the hospital leadership to head off PR trouble offer guidance.

Following the meeting, hospital president Dr. Betsy Nabel told a town hall-style gathering that all is well — that the coding problems will pass and revenue levels reestablish themselves. And after all, she noted, the Epic install is already working well enough that there’s been no increase in medical errors at the hospital.

Well, that’s a start at least. Keeping medical errors from getting worse is certainly a good thing. But for its sake, let’s hope the Brigham expects more than that from Epic!

HCA Builds Capacity For Resilience Into EMR Rollout Training

Posted on January 1, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

A few weeks ago, Hospital Corporation of America had a rather substantial EMR outage. The outage, which was caused by a problem with storage hardware, lasted about 24 hours. It largely affected a portion of the 50 hospitals it operates in Florida, but some of the 115 HCA hospitals located outside Florida were impacted too.

Though large EMR outages are worth noting, my purpose in writing this blog is not to slam HCA. Actually, HCA staffers seem to have been prepared for the worst. In fact, according to an article from the Healthcare Financial Management Association, HCA built resiliency into its EMR rollout and operations process. And that is interesting indeed.

Hiring for talent and attitude

To roll out an EMR across its large network of hospitals, HCA leaders settled on an unusual strategy.  Rather than sign up a cadre of pure HIT specialists, HCA decided to hire professionals across a wide variety of disciplines.

As it turned out, all of the 120 EMR implementation specialists it hired were under age 30, with strong organizing, communication and collaborative skills. Their degrees included English, marketing and biomedical science.

Training for rollout

To train the newly-blessed specialists, HCA created hCare University. The new team members got four to six weeks of training, including both hands-on and classroom education, in vital skills such as working with clinicians and managing projects.

hCare University also taught the implementation specialists HCA’s EMR methodology, refining the approach — and how it taught that approach — over time. HCA trialed its methods at one pilot hospital, then two more, and eventually rolled it out to 20 to 40 hospitals at a time, HFMA reports.

Stressing inclusiveness and communication

As the rollout progressed, hCare teachers and system leaders continued to hammer home the importance of effective communication — and just as importantly, making sure that clinicians felt included.

“We probably spent as much, if not more, time on the people aspects as on the technology,” said consultant Mary Mirabelli, who oversaw the rollout, as well as HCA’s Stage 1 Meaningful Use efforts. “Because you’re expecting clinicians to exhibit new behaviors and embrace a system that is sometimes not well designed for their needs, you have to figure out ways to give them control and involve them in decision making.”

Now, I admit to being a bit biased, as I’m the kind of liberal arts jack-of-all-trades HCA relied on to supervise its rollout. And I want to emphasize that I’m not suggesting that traditional HIT hires are per-se inflexible!

That being said (having declared my prejudices), I would tend to believe that HCA is telling the truth when it asserts that staff confidently worked around the outage, despite its length and breadth.  I would assert that mixing in people whose primary skills are “soft” with HIT pros is an excellent way to support a resilient attitude when EMR problelms emerge.

Investing in people who can coordinate with all sides is actually good for HIT staffers. After all, doesn’t it benefit the HIT department when other folks are out there building good will, fostering cooperation and (in hopefully rare cases) minimizing damage to morale when snags or outages occur?

Maybe It’s Time To Phase Out The Meaningful Use Program

Posted on December 29, 2015 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

Since Stage 1 of the Meaningful Use incentive program kicked off in 2011, the level of health IT adoption has risen dramatically across the United States. As publicly-funded programs go, it’s had quite a ride.

A few years in, nearly 97% of U.S. hospitals had achieved Stage 1 or higher of the HIMSS EMR Adoption model (as of Q1 2015). And a plurality (roughly 57%) were at Stage 5 or higher.

Meanwhile, 83% of office-based doctors are now using EMRs, according to a recent report from ONC.  The percentage drops to 74% when counting only physicians using certified EMRs, but that’s still a very substantial increase over the 57% of office-based docs using EMRs in 2011.

Whether this progress was worth the $28.1 billion paid out (as of December 2014) is anyone’s guess, but clearly, the program had a huge impact. In fact, it’s hard to argue that MU payments helped to trigger a major change in how medicine is practiced.

That being said, some critics are floating the idea that it’s time to retire Meaningful Use, or at minimum, pull back its implementation dramatically. For example, HIT superstar John Halamka contends that Meaningful Use programs “have served their purpose.”

In his blog, Halamka — who serves as CIO of both the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center — suggests that Stage 3 of MU is little more than a multi-train pile-up (the following quote is long but deserves to be read in full):

 Stage 3 makes many of the same mistakes as Stage 2, trying to do too much too soon. It requires patient accessible Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) without specifying any standards.   It requires sending discharge e-prescriptions although pharmacies cannot widely support the cancel transaction that is essential to discharge medication management workflow.   It requires public health transactions but CMS has no authority to require public health authorities to standardize the way they receive data.

Clinicians cannot get through a 12 minute visit, enter the necessary Stage 3 data elements, reconcile problems/allergies/medications from multiple institutions, meet the demands of the  Stage 3 clinical quality measures, make eye contact with patients, and deliver safe medical care.

Having read the above, you won’t be surprised to learn that elsewhere, Halamka argues that Stage 3 of Meaningful Use should be dropped completely. Instead, he’d like to see the government offer merit-based rewards for positive outcomes and innovative approaches.

While Halamka’s arguments make a lot of sense, another group of people want to address the fact that the Meaningful Use program incentives have never been available to most mental health providers. As readers may know, mental health facilities such as psychiatric hospitals and substance abuse treatment facilities currently aren’t eligible for Medicaid and Medicare MU incentives. Also, front-line mental health professionals such as psychologists and licensed social workers are not included in the current definition of “eligible professionals.”

A bill progressing through the U.S. House of Representatives, H.R. 2646 (“Helping Families in Mental Health Crisis Act of 2015”) proposes to add clinical psychologists to the list of eligible professionals, and psychiatric hospitals, community mental health centers, residential or outpatient mental health and substance abuse treatment facilities to the list of eligible providers. While I’m not suggesting that Meaningful Use as currently structured is the only way to address the mental health industry’s HIT needs, those needs shouldn’t be forgotten. In fact, John would argue that not being involved in meaningful use might be the best thing that happened to mental health EHR.

I’d agree that eliminating — or at minimum transforming — the existing Meaningful Use program may be a good idea. Better to try something new than drag providers through a wasteful, painful rout.

A Look At Precision Medicine Solutions Available Today

Posted on December 22, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Personalized and Precision Medicine are all the buzz since President Obama announced the Precision Medicine Initiative. However, after the government tragedy known as meaningful use, many are reasonably skeptical of government initiatives to improve healthcare. Plus, the rhetoric around what’s possible with precision medicine and the realities that most hospitals and doctors face every day feels like a massive disconnect.

The reality is that there’s good reason to be skeptical of precision medicine. Think about the scope of the problem. The world of health data that we live in today is 10-20 times bigger that it was even a decade ago. That’s a massive increase in the amount of data available. Plus, much of that data is unstructured data. Combine the volume of data with the accessibility (or lack therof) of that data and it’s easy to see why some are skeptical of really implementing precision medicine in their hospital today.

When you look at current EHR systems, none of them are built to enable precision medicine. First, they were built as massive billing engines and not as engines designed to improve care. Second, meaningful use has hijacked their development roadmap for years and will likely continue to hijack their development teams for years to come. Finally, there’s been so much money doing what they’re doing, what motivation do the entrenched EHR companies have to go out and do more?

The unfortunate reality of EHR systems is that they’re not built for real time availability of data analytics that provides improved care and precision, personalized medicine. Some may get there eventually, but we’re unlikely to see them get there anytime soon. I’ve heard precision medicine defined as a puzzle with 3 billion pieces. We have to start looking outside of traditional EHR companies to start solving such a complex puzzle.

The good news is that even though EHR vendors are not providing precision medicine solutions, we’re starting to see other vendors providing precision medicine solutions today. You no longer need to wait for an EHR vendor to participate.

One example of precision medicine happening today is the recently announced SAP Foundation for Health (we’ll forgive them on the somewhat confusing name). At the core of the SAP Foundation for Health is the SAP Hana engine. Unlike many EHR systems, SAP Hana was designed for real time data analysis of massive amounts of data and that includes both granular and free form data. You can see this capability first hand in the work SAP is doing with ASCO (American Society of Clinical Oncology) and their CancerLinQ project.

Dr. Clifford Hudis from CancerLinQ (Created by ASCO) described how personalized medicine to his grandfather was going around and visiting each patient. Over time that practice stopped and we started seeing patients in clinics where we generally only had one data set available to us: the clinical data that we captured ourselves on a paper chart. Unfortunately, as we moved electronic, we just recreated our paper chart world in electronic form. It’s too bad we didn’t do more during our shift to going electronic. However, that still means we have the opportunity to aggregate and analyze health data for the benefit of our patients. In some ways, we’re starting to democratize access to health data in order to enable precision medicine.

As Dr. Hudis pointed out, healthcare currently really only learns from patients who take part in clinical research trials. In other words, that only amounts to about 3% of adult patients who contribute to our learning. This limits our view since most clinical research trials have a biased sample which aren’t representative of the general population. How can we create personalized medicine if we only have data on 3% of the patient population? This is the problem CancerLinQ and SAP Foundation for Health are working to solve. Can they create a platform that learns from every patient?

ASCO together with SAP’s Foundation for Health is working to aggregate and analyze data across cancer patients regardless of whether they’re part of a clinical research study or not. In the past, Dr. Hudis pointed out that cancer tracking use to track cancer populations with simple groups like “small cell cancer” versus “non-small cell cancer.” That was a start, but had limited precision when trying to treat a patient. With this relatively new world of genomics, ASCO can now identify, track, and compare a patient’s cancer by specific genomic alterations. This is a fantastic development since tumors generally contain changed DNA. We can now use these DNA abnormalities to classify and track cancer patients in a much more precise way than we’ve done in the past.

This platform enables oncologists the opportunity to see real time information about their patient that’s personalized to the patients own genetic abnormalities. Instead of calling around to their network of oncologist friends, Cancer LinQ provides real time access to other patient populations with similar genetic abnormalities and could give them insight into what treatments are working for similar patients. This can also provide benchmarking for oncologists to see how they compare against their colleagues. Plus, it can show real time data to an oncologist so they can know how thorough and consistent they are with their patient population. Instead of working in a bubble, the oncologist can leverage the network of data to provide true precision medicine for their patients.

Another great example of precision medicine happening today is seen in the work of Carlos Bustamante, Professor of Genetics and Stanford University School of Medicine. Carlos is using SAP Foundation for Health to quickly identify genetic abnormalities in high performing athletes. Rather than recount the stories of Carlos’ work here, I’ll just link to this video where Carlos talks about the amazing insights they’ve found from studying the genomic abnormalties of high performing athletes. I love that his precision medicine work with high performing athletes has significant potential benefits for every patient.

Carlos is spot on in the video linked above when he says that the drop in genomic sequencing costs would be like taking a $400,000 Ferrari and now selling it for 10 cents. What originally took $13 billion and years of effort to sequence the first genome now takes $1500 and a few days. Access to every patient’s genome is going to change the types of drugs we develop, the treatment options we provide patients, our choice of drugs to treat a patient, and much much more. You can see that first hand in the work that ASCO and Stanford University School of Medicine are doing. Is there any more personalized medicine than the human genome?

Of course, the genome is just one of the many factors we’re seeing in the precision medicine revolution. We can’t forget about other variables that impact a patient’s health like environmental, behavioral, patient preference, and much more. We really are looking at a multi-billion piece puzzle and we’re just getting started. Remember that healthcare is not linear, but we’ve been treating it like it is for years. Healthcare is a complex matrices of challenges and we need our technology solutions to reflect that fact.

I see a beautiful future for precision medicine that’s already begun and builds into the future. We’re developing and targeting new drugs, devices and services that work for populations and individuals. We’re seeing new open, secure platforms that provide real-time flexible R&D analysis, genomics and other “omics” disciplines, patient cohort building and analysis, patient trial matching, and extended care collaboration solutions.

Data by itself is not valuable. However, the right engine on top of the right data is changing how we look at healthcare. We’re getting a much more precise view of each individual patient. Where have you seen precision medicine starting to take hold? What precision medicine solutions are you using in your organization?

Also, check out this infographic which looks at SAP’s view of precision medicine:
Personalized Medicine You Can Do Today

SAP is uniquely positioned to help advance personalized medicine. The SAP Foundation for Health is built on the SAP Hana platform which provides scalable cloud analytics solutions across the spectrum of healthcare. SAP is a sponsor of Influential Networks of which Healthcare Scene is a member.

Rural Hospitals Catching Up In HIT Adoption

Posted on December 14, 2015 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

Historically, rural hospitals have lagged when it comes to health IT adoption. But according to at least one yardstick, the HIMSS EMR Adoption Model (EMRAM), rural facilities seem to have closed much of the gap.

Just a few years ago, many rural hospitals were barely at stage one of the model, which ranks facilities from Stage 0 (All three ancillaries not installed) to Stage 7 (Complete EMR; CCD transactions to share data; Data warehousing; Data continuity with ED, ambulatory, OP). Only two years ago, research suggested that rural and critical access hospitals were lagging far behind in meeting Meaningful Use criteria, and risked incurring penalties this year.

By the end of 2014, however, rural hospitals averaged a Stage 4 rating (CPOE, Clinical Decision Support (clinical protocols). This compares favorably with the 4.7 rank achieved by urban hospitals, and though academic/teaching hospitals were well ahead at a 5.4 ranking, that’s a much smaller difference than you might have seen even five years ago. Meaningful Use incentives, plus overall industry pressure to automate, seem to have done their job.

I’m pondering this, in part, because the CPSI acquisition of Healthland piqued my interest. CPSI picked up Healthland, a provider of rural and critical access hospital software, for $250 million. Given rural hospitals’ history of slow HIT adoption, I wasn’t sure what CPSI saw in Healthland, though the deal does bring revenue cycle management and an EMR for post-acute care facilities to the table.

Now that I’ve learned what progress the rural health IT market has seen, I’m no longer so skeptical. In fact, when you consider that the Healthland acquisition brings 3,300 post-acute customers that it didn’t have before, it seems like CPSI got a pretty nice deal.

Given the growing strength of the rural HIT market, I don’t think the Healthland buyout will be the last domino to fall here. I can easily imagine the giants — Cerner in particular — seeing their way clear to acquiring the combined CPSI/Healthland entity. Why Cerner? Well, if for no other reasons than having a ton of cash — and a more flexible attitude than Epic — I can imagine Cerner getting excited about rural access.

But even putting aside M&A dynamics, the news from rural markets is still intriguing. While having sophisticated health IT infrastructure is a plus anywhere, my guess is that it will be particularly powerful for rural and critical access hospitals. I hope that the growth of HIT capabilities brings a breath of fresh air — and the benefits of cutting-edge care management — to facilities that have traditionally gotten the short end of the stick.

Keeping Telehealth in Compliance

Posted on December 9, 2015 I Written By

Erin Head is the Director of Health Information Management (HIM) and Quality for an acute care hospital in Titusville, FL. She is a renowned speaker on a variety of healthcare and social media topics and currently serves as CCHIIM Commissioner for AHIMA. She is heavily involved in many HIM and HIT initiatives such as information governance, health data analytics, and ICD-10 advocacy. She is active on social media on Twitter @ErinHead_HIM and LinkedIn. Subscribe to Erin's latest HIM Scene posts here.

Telehealth, or telemedicine, promises to create better opportunities for increased access to healthcare. It makes perfect sense to meet patients where they are instead of requiring them to travel sometimes long distances for adequate care. We know that some diagnoses and treatments will definitely require an office or hospital visit but staying healthy, keeping compliant with medications, and maintaining chronic diseases could easily be addressed with telehealth.

Technology and EHR advances are already making many healthcare tasks easier and more convenient such as remote coding and web-based training. Smart phones and secure texting are being used by interdisciplinary teams to conveniently reach members of the team for coordination of care. Telehealth fits right into the mix using technology to bridge the geographic distance and gaps in patients’ access to care.

As with all healthcare operations, we must remember the sensitive nature of the subject matter at hand. Many try to cite HIPAA compliance as a potential barrier to adopting new technology. In contrast, HIPAA laws are being updated inline with the technology changes and we are able to securely exchange information by following the rules and taking appropriate measures to safeguard protected health information.

In order to successfully use telehealth, providers must work with health information technology professionals to ensure the technical and physical safeguards are in place for transmitting information to and from patients. Information must be kept secure and private which will continue to challenge health IT and HIM professionals. Patients must feel comfortable trusting that their personal information will be protected in the telehealth format just as it is in other media formats.

Other key concerns with telehealth are payment and insurance coverage. While telehealth will reduce the costs of healthcare, there is still a need for reimbursement to cover the provider’s time and expertise provided through a telehealth “visit” and the technology needed. There are many new conversations going to Congress in the near future to address the need for funding for telehealth particularly in rural areas. One of these is a bill referred to as the Telehealth Innovation and Improvement Act introduced recently. Until the benefits, cost savings, and effectiveness of telehealth can be understood by the Federal Government, we will continue to see the slow adoption rate. Once these issues are addressed and Government funding becomes available, there will be explicit guidelines and criteria for providers to meet in order to be in compliance with the payment structures.

We continue to strive for the best possible methods of meeting the needs of healthcare consumers in today’s technology driven society. We must marry the best of both worlds to provide convenient and cost-effective access to healthcare with secure and confidential methods of transferring protected health information. All of this will come with a price tag and will require the successful collaboration of health IT, HIM, and compliance professionals.

If you’d like to receive future HIM posts by Erin in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

On Premise versus Cloud Analytics

Posted on December 7, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’ve long been hearing those people talk about the cloud. Most famously, Jonathan Bush has been beating the drum of the power of the cloud and how the cloud EHR vendors are going to take down their dinosaur client server counterparts. In the hospital world that has yet to happen for EHR software, but the cloud has still become a major part of every healthcare IT organization.

When we look at our personal lives, we all have data stored in the cloud. The cloud is a major part of most of our lives. I know I try to store nothing locally and run pretty much my entire business and personal life in the cloud. I had to recently replace my cell phone. Turns out that the change didn’t matter at all since everything I did was in the cloud. I literally didn’t even know the number of my cell phone. I just got the new phone, logged into the cloud and everything started to sync up (I did have to log in to a bunch of apps). It was beautiful.

In the latest movements towards the cloud, I’ve seen a lot of people talking about healthcare analytics heading to the cloud. It begs the question, “Will the cloud win out in the healthcare analytics space?

I think the biggest naysayers to cloud analytics are those who say that they aren’t planning to move all their data to the cloud and they’re not comfortable with all their EHR data in the cloud so they don’t see how cloud analytics will work for them. (Side Note: I always love how we claim privacy and security when we don’t want to do something, but we don’t actually do something to ensure the privacy and security of our data.)

No doubt opinions like this will slow the adoption of cloud analytics. Most vendors I know are going to offer either option for the forseeable future. However, there are some new technologies which leave your data in place, but can leverage the cloud to access the data as needed. I first saw this with SAP, but there are probably others that are doing it too. I think technologies like this will change many people’s view of using the cloud to handle their analytics.

On a much larger scale, I don’t think health care will have a choice but to use the cloud. I don’t see every health care organization building their own private cloud in order to do all of the genomic medicine which is starting to come. I don’t see every health care organization getting the benchmarking and “grand rounds” style of data that analytics providers can provide across disparate organizations. I don’t see most organizations being able to afford to build their own analytics engine on site.

I could keep going on, but the way health care analytics is going I’m not sure that hospitals will have any choice but to embrace cloud analytics. I know this leaves many hospital CIOs uncomfortable. However, burying your head in the sand and acting like it’s not going to happen won’t make you more comfortable. Denial isn’t a good strategy. The best way to be comfortable with it and ensure that healthcare analytics clouds are safe, private and secure is for hospital organizations to make a real investment of time into what’s going on.

What do you think? Is the future of analytics at hospitals going to be in the cloud?

Healthcare IT Market Salary Survey

Posted on December 3, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

For the past couple of years, we’ve helped support Greythorn’s efforts to survey the healthcare IT marketplace. The survey has always produced an interesting look into the salary, job satisfaction, and benefits packages that are being offered across the health care IT industry. We hope that readers of Hospital EMR and EHR will participate in their 2016 survey so they have the best data possible.

We get to see the challenge of healthcare IT job seekers every day on our Healthcare IT Central job board. One of the challenges we see people face over and over is the decision of whether to leave their current job or not. The data from the Greythorn health care IT market survey is one way to assess whether you should leave your current position for greener pastures or whether your current position is one of the greener pastures and you just didn’t realize it.

Plus, the survey looks at a lot of other areas of health care IT beyond just salary. For example, in the past couple years, the market survey showed us the major shift that was happening as EHR experts moved from being consultants to full time employees.

The survey is anonymous and takes 10 minutes to complete, covering questions of salary, benefits packages, career motivation, job satisfaction, and more. A free report based on this research will be published and share on Hospital EMR and EHR in a future post. I hope you’ll participate so the report reflects the best data possible.

Full Disclosure: Greythorn posts their healthcare IT jobs on Healthcare IT Central.