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AMIA17 – There’s Gold in Them EHRs!

Posted on November 13, 2017 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

If even 10% of the research presented at the 2017 American Medical Informatics Association conference (AMIA17) is adopted by mainstream healthcare, the impact on costs, quality and patient outcomes will be astounding. Real-time analysis of EHR data to determine the unique risk profile of each patient, customized remote monitoring based on patient + disease profiles, electronic progress notes using voice recognition and secondary uses of patient electronic records were all discussed at AMIA17.

Attending AMIA17 was an experience like no other. I understood less than half of the information being presented and I loved it. It felt like I was back in university – which is the only other time I have been around so many people with advanced degrees. By the time I left AMIA17, I found myself wishing I had paid more attention during my STATS302 classes.

It was especially interesting to be at AMIA17 right after attending the 3-day CHIME17 event for Hospital CIOs. CHIME17 was all about optimizing investments made in HealthIT over the past several years, especially EHRs (see this post for more details). AMIA17 was very much an expansion on the CHIME17 theme. AMIA17 was all about leveraging and getting value from the data collected by HealthIT systems over the past several years.

A prime example of this was the work presented by Michael Rothman, Ph.D of Pera Health. Rothman created a way to analyze key vital signs RELATIVE to a patient’s unique starting condition to determine whether they are in danger. Dubbed the Rothman Index, this algorithm presents clinicians and caregivers with more accurate alarms and notifications. With all the devices and systems in hospitals today, alarm fatigue is a very real and potentially deadly situation.

Missed ventilator alarms was #3 on ECRI Institute’s 2017 Top 10 Health Technology Hazards. It was #2 on the 2016 Top 10 list. According to ECRI: “Failure to recognize and respond to an actionable clinical alarm condition in a timely manner can result in serious patient injury or death”. The challenge is not the response but rather how to determine which alarms are informational and which are truly an indicator of a clinical condition that needs attention.

Comments from RNs in adverse-event reports shared in a 2016 presentation to the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI) sums up this challenge nicely:

“Alarm fatigue is leading to significant incidents because there are so many nuisance alarms and no one even looks up when a high-priority alarm sounds. Failure to rescue should be a never event but it isn’t.”

“Too many nuisance alarms, too many patients inappropriately monitored. Continuous pulse oximetry is way overused and accounts for most of the alarms. Having everyone’s phone ring to one patient’s alarm makes you not respond to them most of the time.”

This is exactly what Rothman is trying to address with his work. Instead of using a traditional absolute-value approach to setting alarms – which are based on the mythical “average patient” – Rothman’s method uses the patient’s actual data to determine their unique baseline and sets alarms relative to that. According to Rothman, this could eliminate as much as 80% of the unnecessary alarms in hospitals.

Other notable presentations at AMIA17 included:

  • MedStartr Pitch IT winner, FHIR HIEDrant, on how to mine and aggregate clinically relevant data from HIEs and present it to clinicians within their EHRs
  • FHIR guru Joshua C Mandel’s presentation on the latest news regarding CDS Hooks and the amazing Sync-for-Science EHR data sharing for research initiative
  • Tianxi Cai of Harvard School of Public Health sharing her research on how EHR data can be used to determine the efficacy of treatments on an individual patient
  • Eric Dishman’s keynote about the open and collaborative approach to research he is championing within the NIH
  • Carol Friedman’s pioneering work in Natural Language Processing (NLP). Not only did she overcome being a woman scientist but also applying NLP to healthcare something her contemporaries viewed as a complete waste of time

The most impressive thing about AMIA17? The number of students attending the event – from high schoolers to undergraduates to PhD candidates. There were hundreds of them at the event. It was very encouraging to see so many young bright minds using their big brains to improve healthcare.

I left AMIA17 excited about the future of HealthIT.

Two Hidden Gems at the HIMSS15 Annual Conference

Posted on March 20, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’m deep in my preparations for the HIMSS Annual Conference in Chicago. It’s amazing how quickly the schedule fills up. It has me really excited to meet with so many amazing people. To all the PR people who have sent me pitches, I’ll be getting back to you shortly. Yes, I do respond to each and every one of you. No, sending another request won’t get a response faster. In fact, it will make the response slower.

My own schedule aside, I was thinking today that there are two gems at HIMSS that many people don’t know about. So, I thought I’d share them with you.

The CIO Forum
This event is put together by CHIME and is a shorter version of the CHIME Fall CIO Forum. You can check out the schedule of events here. CHIME always does a great job bringing together some great speakers from the industry and also some to address topics like leadership.

While the content is great, the best part of the event is being surrounded by CIOs. Everywhere you turn is another hospital CIO. It makes for a tremendous opportunity to connect and learn from hospital CIOs. The event does cost extra, so make sure you get the right pass if you want to attend. If you’re there, come say hi.

New Media Meetup
I’m a little bias on this event since it’s the one I host, but it’s always my favorite part of HIMSS. There’s a special energy at the event that comes from all of the amazing people in New Media that are at HIMSS. Everywhere you turn at the event you run into someone else that you’ve likely interacted with on Twitter or some other social media.

The event has evolved over time. Originally it brought together bloggers, but quickly expanded to anyone involved in social media. You can find all the details for the event here. I hope that some readers can make it. If you do, be sure to come take a selfie with me or something.

Those are a few of my favorite events at HIMSS that many people don’t know about. What are your favorite parts of HIMSS?

AHA urges agencies to speed up EMR choice expansion

Posted on June 23, 2014 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

In a move that shouldn’t surprise anybody, the American Hospital Association is urging CMS and the ONC to hurry up and finalize new rules which would expand choice for certified EMRs.

The AHA letter argues that its members are on the verge of walking away from Meaningful Use. But if CMS and the ONC speed ahead with with the new proposed rules — which would offer more choice in specific meaningful use requirements they must meet this year — hospitals will be much better equipped to proceed.

Why the rush? Well, for one thing, the letter argues, time is of the essence for hospitals, which have to decide their meaningful use strategy for fiscal 2014. If they must make choices before the new rule is finalized, it could cause them “significant financial and operational harm,” the AHA contends.

Meanwhile, if the agencies don’t push these rules through quickly, “many providers are likely to conclude that they cannot meet meaningful use this year and abandon the program,” wrote Linda Fishman, AHA senior vice president of public policy analysis and development, in a letter to CMS Administrator Marilyn Tavenner and National Coordinator Karen DeSalvo, MD.

The letter also takes on other issues. It asks that CMS and ONC clarify the rules implementation, offer more flexibility in the reporting of clinical quality measures, shorten the MU reporting period for 2015 in analyze lessons learned from Stage 2 before finalizing Stage 3’s start date, according to HealthcareITNews.

The AHA’s letter comes at a challenging time for the meaningful use program generally, which has of late attracted broader attention than it has in the past.

Not only are industry groups pressuring ONC, legislators are too. For example, at a recent health IT conference, U.S. Rep Tom Price, MD, R-GA, argued that meaningful use is “maybe not even doing what needs to be done as it relates to patients and physicians.”

In his remarks, Price argued that meaningful use could be improved by keeping the patient front and center, making sure patients know they own their health data and establishing an interoperability standard.  But he suggests that because the MU program roadmap was laid out in the HITECH Act, it’s not as fluid as it should be and doesn’t accommodate such concerns.

The reality, however, is that there is no simple way to get interoperability; right now, we’re lucky if individual EMRs meet providers’ needs.  Despite the demands from other stakeholders, health IT vendors still have a lot more to gain by creating islands rather than interoperable products.

HIMSS: Hospitals Achieving Meaningful Use Milestones

Posted on March 6, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

Hospitals are making good progress toward achieving Meaningful Use milestones, a new study by HIMSS suggests.

HIMSS, which surveyed 298 healthcare CIOs between December and February, found that 66 percent had already qualified for Meaningful Use stage 1, while another 4 percent expected to do so before the end of 2012, Information Week reports.

Meanwhile, 75 percent of respondents said they expect to attest for stage 2 in 2014, which  as readers probably know is the first year of stage two attestations.

Given the ambitions noted by the CIOs, it’s not surprising to learn that 66 percent of them said they thought their budgets would definitely or probably increase this year.  Of the remainder, 15 percent said their budgets would remain level, and 8 percent expected to see a decrease.

Last year, achieving Meaningful Use was the hospital CIOs’ top business objective, named by 24 percent of respondents, but this year, it fell to 15 percent. This year, the top health IT business objective has switched over to survival, with 21 percent saying their key goal was to sustain the financial viability of their organizations.  This was followed closely by improving patient care, which came in at 19 percent.

Still, Meaningful  Use will obviously stay top of mind for the CIOs, who may be better prepared than last year but still have much to handle.

After all, they expect to make serious money on achieving MU goals, HIMSS concluded. The survey found that about 30 percent of hospital CIOs expected an ROI of up to $2 million on stage 1, another 23 percent a return of $2 million to $3 million, and 16 percent expected ROI of $4 million to $5 million.

Attending CHIME 2012 Fall CIO Forum

Posted on October 17, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today I arrived at the 2012 Fall CIO Forum for CHIME. I’ve wanted to go to this event for quite a while. My fellow blogger, Neil Versel, had often told me about how great the event was and so I wanted to see it first hand.

Tonight I heard an almost emotional Farzad Mostashari speak and then got to mingle with all of the CIO’s at the evening event. A few things I’ve already noticed that I found interesting.

First, Farzad has really refined his pitch for healthcare IT. He makes a really compelling case for what’s possible and a really common sense analysis of why we need to start using healthcare IT now. If I were to put a title on Farzad’s talk at CHIME, I’d call it, “Stop with the Excuses, We Can Do Better.”

Everything at the event is high class. You can tell that no expense was spared to make sure that the major healthcare IT contributors are treated well.

I wasn’t that surprised, but it’s unfortunate that I was by far the youngest person at the conference (at least from what I saw). One wife of a CIO I talked with asked why there weren’t more young people present. Then she said, “Don’t these hospital CIOs want to groom the next generation of leaders? Why are they holding on so tightly and not preparing for the future.” It’s a good question I wasn’t really sure how to answer.

There are a lot of really powerful people at the event. It was fun to see Judy Faulkner mingling with people. I saw John Glaser. In many ways, it’s a Who’s Who of hospital health IT.

While there are many Hospital CIOs at the event, there are also a lot of vendor representatives. Not surprising considering the amount of budget these hospital CIOs control.

I was amazed at how many people were “old friends.” You could see that many of those attending have been doing so for years and this was their annual visit with colleagues. As a first time attendee, you’d think that I might not feel very welcome, but the opposite was the case. All of the hospital CIOs I met were very friendly, kind and happy to engage.

More on the event tomorrow. If you’re in Palm Springs at the event, I’d love to talk with you. Just leave a comment below or send me a tweet.

Epic Closing Act

Posted on September 27, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Anne already posted a nice summary of the things coming out of the Epic UGM 2012 including a really great opening tribute video using Journey and a Wayne’s World kicker. Just to round that out, the closing act wasn’t nearly as big, but is still worth a watch. Plus, it features Carl Dvorak, COO of Epic, on the guitar. I think you’ll enjoy “One Upon a Go Live” embedded below.