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Why Might Intermountain Have Chosen Cerner Over Epic?

An anonymous person on HIStalk gave some really interesting insights into Intermountain’s decision to go with Cerner instead of Epic.

Re: Intermountain. The short-term choice (three or so years) would have been Epic, but we went with Cerner because of Epic’s dated technology, Cerner’s openness, and the feeling that we would be more of a partner than a customer with Cerner. The partnership is more than words. We’re working closely with Cerner and their horde of sharp, dedicated people on the implementation. We have some pieces they don’t and those are being built into the Cerner system, while some of our own development efforts have been redirected since Cerner already has that functionality. The first rollout is scheduled for December and I think it will go well due to the way the teams are working together. Unverified.

This is the best analysis of Intermountain’s decision to go with Cerner that I’ve seen. As in every billion dollar procurement decision, it’s always got other nuances and pieces that go into the decision making process. However, the above analysis gives us a good place to start.

Let’s look at the main points that are made:

1. Is Epic technology more dated than Cerner?

2. Is Cerner more open than Epic?

3. Will Cerner be more of a partner than Epic would have been?

I’d love to see Judy’s (Epic CEO’s) comments on all of these. I’m sure she’d have a lot to say about each of them. For example, you may remember that Judy described Epic as the most open system she knows. Ask someone who wants to get Epic certified if they’re open. Ask a health IT vendor that wants to work together if Epic is open. Ask even some of their smaller customers who want to do things with Epic if Epic is open. They’d all likely disagree that Epic is the most open system.

I’d love to hear people’s thoughts on each of these three points. I think it will make for a really lively discussion that will help us get closer to understanding the reality of these assertions.

However, reality aside, I can tell you that the public image of Epic vs Cerner certainly confirms all three of these points. Whether Intermountain indeed used these points as part of their decision process or not, I don’t know. What I do know is that it wouldn’t surprise me at all if they did think this way since there are many in the market that believe and share all of the above three impressions.

July 14, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

More of the Siemens Healthcare Back Story

One of the things I love about blogging is the comments that I receive. Many of them come in the comments of the blog, but just as many get emailed to me privately in response to my posts being emailed to readers. Every once in a while I want to share the emails I receive with the readers (Note: You can now subscribe to all of the Healthcare Scene emails in one place). This is one such response that I got in response to my post about Siemens Selling its Health IT business.

I remember the good ol’ days of being a 25+ year SMS Unity customer. Siemens who had recently purchased SMS told us that Unity would be going away. They showed us Soarian (which at the time was not actually built) and said that they would move us there for free. Of course, since it didn’t yet exist we would have to transition to Invision first for about a year. That would also be free. However, they would have to expense us for professional fees which they estimated to be in excess of $1,000,000. This is how we became a Meditech customer.

This kind of back story is what makes healthcare IT so interesting and so challenging. Many who want to enter the healthcare space forget about all this history and they usually fail. The very best hospital health IT companies that I know usually do an amazing job pairing new innovations and technologies together with someone who understands and has been part of this history. Pairing the two together is a powerful combination.

July 10, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

Siemens to Sell Hospital IT Business?

This is some interesting news for the hospital health IT world:

Siemens (SIE) AG is exploring a sale of its hospital database and information-technology unit to focus on energy and industrial businesses, according to two people familiar with the plans.

The German engineering company is evaluating options for the business, and no final decision has yet been made, said the people, who asked not to be identified because the considerations are private. The unit could be valued at more than 1 billion euros ($1.4 billion), said one of the people.

Siemens Chief Executive Officer Joe Kaeser is seeking to focus Siemens around “electrification, automation and digitalization” and has already sold off $2.3 billion euros since late 2012. It seems like Siemens healthcare product line fits great with the digitalization focus, so there’s likely more to the story. My guess is the Siemens healthcare business hasn’t been doing well (Thank you Cerner and Epic) and so he’s looking to get out while there’s still some value in the business.

If you’re a Siemens healthcare customer, you probably welcome this change as well. Hopefully a sale will infuse the company and the product with a new energy that will produce some better results for their customers. Maybe I’m talking to the wrong people, but those I’ve met on Sorian are basically ho-hum about the product. No doubt it will be interesting to watch.

July 9, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

Sutter Health Ready To Deploy HIE, But Can It Succeed?

Sutter Health doesn’t have a great reputation when it comes to EMR implementation. Late last year, when we reported that Sutter’s Epic EMR crashed for an entire day, comments came pouring in about the company’s questionable approach to training its staff on using the system.

According to Epic consultants who’d been involved in the project, Sutter leaders decided that Epic experts were there to “facilitate” training done by inexperienced in-house teams, rather than actually teach key users what they need to know. The result was strife, disorder and anxiety, according to several consultants who’d been involved. Since then, Sutter has connected its EMR to five medical foundations and 17 hospital campuses; by next year, it expects the EMR to connect to information on 3 million patients. But there’s no reason to think it’s changed its training strategy, which could cast a bit of a pall over the new project.

Now, Sutter Health is building out a health information exchange, working with Orion Health, which will tie together hospitals and doctors both inside and outside of its network across northern California. Sutter plans to begin deploying the HIE in phases this summer, starting with data integration with the Epic EMR and extending to testing exchange of inbound and outbound data. If the project works out, it seems likely that it will be a plus for every provider that does business with Sutter.

The question is, will Sutter do a better job of managing this process than it did in rolling out its EMR? While it’s easy to boast that your plans are going to be a “gamechanger” for the market, it’s hard to take that claim at face value when your EMR implementation hasn’t gone so splendidly.

Certainly, Orion is a reputable HIE vendor which has been praised for having strong products and service. And Sutter certainly has the financial wherewithal to see such an effort through. The thing is, if Sutter leaders (seemingly) took a wrongheaded approach to the all-important issue of EMR training, who knows what curveballs they might throw into the process of rolling out an HIE? Even if its EMR has stabilized and Sutter has somehow gotten past its training hurdles, its past missteps don’t inspire confidence.

If I were with Orion, I’d draw a firm line where training was concerned, as Sutter’s past strategy only seems to have cast its last major HIT vendor in a bad light. If not, I’d make sure the contract had a workable bailout clause…or be prepared for some serious headaches.

June 30, 2014 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies.

AHA urges agencies to speed up EMR choice expansion

In a move that shouldn’t surprise anybody, the American Hospital Association is urging CMS and the ONC to hurry up and finalize new rules which would expand choice for certified EMRs.

The AHA letter argues that its members are on the verge of walking away from Meaningful Use. But if CMS and the ONC speed ahead with with the new proposed rules — which would offer more choice in specific meaningful use requirements they must meet this year — hospitals will be much better equipped to proceed.

Why the rush? Well, for one thing, the letter argues, time is of the essence for hospitals, which have to decide their meaningful use strategy for fiscal 2014. If they must make choices before the new rule is finalized, it could cause them “significant financial and operational harm,” the AHA contends.

Meanwhile, if the agencies don’t push these rules through quickly, “many providers are likely to conclude that they cannot meet meaningful use this year and abandon the program,” wrote Linda Fishman, AHA senior vice president of public policy analysis and development, in a letter to CMS Administrator Marilyn Tavenner and National Coordinator Karen DeSalvo, MD.

The letter also takes on other issues. It asks that CMS and ONC clarify the rules implementation, offer more flexibility in the reporting of clinical quality measures, shorten the MU reporting period for 2015 in analyze lessons learned from Stage 2 before finalizing Stage 3′s start date, according to HealthcareITNews.

The AHA’s letter comes at a challenging time for the meaningful use program generally, which has of late attracted broader attention than it has in the past.

Not only are industry groups pressuring ONC, legislators are too. For example, at a recent health IT conference, U.S. Rep Tom Price, MD, R-GA, argued that meaningful use is “maybe not even doing what needs to be done as it relates to patients and physicians.”

In his remarks, Price argued that meaningful use could be improved by keeping the patient front and center, making sure patients know they own their health data and establishing an interoperability standard.  But he suggests that because the MU program roadmap was laid out in the HITECH Act, it’s not as fluid as it should be and doesn’t accommodate such concerns.

The reality, however, is that there is no simple way to get interoperability; right now, we’re lucky if individual EMRs meet providers’ needs.  Despite the demands from other stakeholders, health IT vendors still have a lot more to gain by creating islands rather than interoperable products.

June 23, 2014 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies.

Georgia EMR Disaster: Was IT Department Responsible?

A few weeks ago, heads began to roll at Georgia’s Athens Regional Health System when its $31 million Cerner rollout began to fall apart. After clinicians complained that a rushed rollout process was generating a host of medication errors and other mistakes, President and CEO James Thaw resigned, and less than a week later, SVP and CIO Gretchen Tegethoff left as well.

Since then, however, the political landscape there has changed, with the facility’s chief medical officer, as well as Cerner executives, contending that the disaster was due to mistakes by the health systems IT team, according to HealthcareITNews. The Cerner execs, CMO and others are arguing that IT leaders made strategic decisions that should’ve been made by clinicians, the publication says.

A local paper, the Athens Banner Herald, notes that the Cerner rollout was done largely by the hospital’s IT team, and that few end-users were involved. That, at least, is what Cerner VP Michael Robin told the paper.  And a different Cerner VP, Ben Himes, took another shot at the IT department, arguing that this implementation seems to have come out on the IT side of things, rather than stressing clinical involvement.

The bottom line seems to be that regardless of what actually happened, the clinicians at the hospital seem to of felt left out of the process, never good thing when we’re dealing with a tool that they’ll need to use everyday.  Regardless of what actually happened, it seems the hospital’s IT department didn’t do a good job of engaging clinicians and getting their feedback; under those circumstances, the likelihood of kicked up a fuss even if implementation was otherwise smooth.

On the other hand, I’m always a little skeptical when vendors point fingers at their customers and say it was their fault when things go wrong. OK, I realize that there may be some truth to their accusations, and that Cerner has a right to defend itself, but it’s hardly a good PR move to dump problems with the implementation completely in the customer’s lap.

The truth is, will probably never know exactly what happened with this EMR implementation. Considering the scale of the project, and the number of people involved, it’s inevitable that this will go down in a blaze of finger-pointing. But it never hurts to be reminded that EMR implementations which leads physicians feeling as though they’re on the sidelines are politically risky at best, and potentially disastrous at worst.

 

June 18, 2014 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare consultant and analyst with 20 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies.

Epic’s 13 Principles

I recently came across this blog called “Life After Epic” which has the subtitle, “For the soon-to-be-Ex Epic Employee.” Although, if you look at the blog address it’s FiredFromEpic.blogspot.com. I assume Fired from Epic was the original blog name, but was likely changed for obvious reasons.

I’m sure I’ll reference more articles from this blog in the future, but I was really intrigued by the 13 Epic Principles that the blog’s been covering recently. Epic’s 13 Principles definitely provide some interesting insight into the EHR vendor Epic.

1. Do not go public.
2. Do not be acquired.
3. Expectations = reality.
4. Keep commitments.
5. Be frugal.
6. Have standards. Don’t do deals.
7. Create innovative and helpful products.
8. Have fun with customers.
9. Follow processes. Find root causes. Fix processes.
10. Don’t take on debt for operations, no matter how good the deal.
11. Focus on competency. Do not tolerate mediocrity.
12. Teach philosophy and culture.
13. If you disagree, dissent. Once decided, support.

What do you think of these principles? If you’ve dealt with Epic, you’ve no doubt seen a lot of them in action.

June 17, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

Cerner EHR Physician Training Video

I posted the following video on EHR videos, but I thought that many readers of this site would find it really interesting as well. The video has a bunch of physicians talking about their training for the Cerner EHR. I’m sure many of you have heard doctors just like the ones in the video before. Here’s a little background on the EHR implementation:

Via Christi is part of Ascension Health, and it’s the largest health system in Kansas. It has about a dozen hospitals across the state, several more clinics and senior centers. They had 15 different EHR systems they turned off when they switched to Cerner’s EHR. The Kansas paper reported that the new EHR cost $85 million.

I love to listen to all the doctors talking and think “and what’s the rest of the story.” If you listen carefully you can see how many of them are very careful with their wording.

June 13, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

The Best Thing For Epic Might Be to NOT Win the DoD Contract

For those not familiar with the Department of Defence (DoD) EHR contract that’s being bid on right now, check out our post about the $11 billion EHR contract. Yes, you’re reading that right. That’s $11 billion with a B. I believe that would be the largest single EHR contract ever (I believe Kaiser was $4 billion to start).

Needless to say, this is an enormous contract that will make some outside companies very rich. I can’t even imagine what $11 billion of EHR consultants and software would look like. That’s a lot of EHR jobs to go around, but I digress.

Most people in the industry seem to believe that Epic is the front runner in the race. Considering the number of large deals that Epic has won, Epic winning the DoD EHR contract would be a safe bet. Although, I wonder if the best thing for Epic would be for them to not win the DoD contract.

Sure, Epic would take a short term PR hit if someone else like Cerner wins the DoD contract. You can already predict the press headlines talking about the fall from power as Epic loses to Cerner (similar to when Cerner won the Intermountain deal over Epic). That would have some damage to Epic’s reputation, but not really. It’s not like any other hospital in the US thinks that their contract would be anything like the DoD EHR contract. In fact, many of the hospitals purchasing Epic EHR will be grateful that Epic resources aren’t being tied up on a new $11 billion contract while their “small” $100 million EHR project languishes.

Indeed, the best thing for Epic might be for it to NOT win the DoD EHR contract. Let’s remember that Epic has a really good history of successful EHR implementations. Sure, there are a few examples where the Epic implementation hasn’t gone so well. However, I think the general view of the industry is that Epic implementations generally go well. In fact, there are stories of Epic contracts so stringent that when an Epic implementation starts to go bad, Epic comes in and takes over to make sure that the implementation goes well.

Long story short, Epic has the best reputation of any hospital EHR vendor when it comes to successful EHR implementations (especially large ones). Epic winning the DoD EHR contract could do a lot to tarnish that reputation.

One might argue that if Epic’s successful with the $11 billion DoD EHR contract, that it will be a boon to their current reputation. That’s fair, but the DoD EHR implementation would be unlike most other EHR implementations. First, the DoD doesn’t have a sterling reputation for successful healthcare software projects. That will likely become an issue for anyone who wins the contract. Second, we’re talking about a government entity with layers of red tape and bureaucracy. A small company like Epic (small in government contractor terms) isn’t going to carry the same weight as they usually do in their other hospital EHR implementations. Epic, the control company, won’t be able to control the DoD EHR project the same way they usually do.

One could use the same argument I used above about why even if Epic gets the DoD contract and fails, it won’t tarnish their reputation since hospitals realize that the DoD is unique. However, the difference between losing a bid and a failed $11 billion project is very different. The failed DoD EHR bid will be covered once and then generally forgotten. A failed $11 billion contract can carry on for years as timelines are delayed, budget overruns are reported, discontent leaks out, he said-she said occurs, and the media churns and speculates on what’s happening with the DoD EHR project.

We all think that winning an $11 billion contract would be great. Indeed, that’s a lot of money and would be an enormous win worth celebrating. The only question is how long will the celebration continue? If I’m Epic, I wouldn’t be too sad if I didn’t win the contract. In the long term, it might be for the best.

June 2, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.

First Hand Perspective on Meditech EHR

The following was an interesting and insightful first person customer response to my post about Meditech EHR. These comments are from an IS Director and current user of Meditech.

As someone who’s worked with Meditech systems for a number of years I’d offer the following observations/opinions:

1. They don’t charge enough to make the charts that measure success in terms of revenue.

2. If success were measured in number of clients they would lead the pack with over 25% of the US EMR market and over 40% of the Canadian.

3. They are considered a ‘small’ hospital product by the general EMR community. Thus, ‘big’ hospitals tend to ignore them. Too bad. They scale nicely.

4. They don’t advertise heavily. Word of mouth seems to be their go-to model.

5. They have an ugly UI. However, they get the job done reasonably well.

Like most EMR vendors they have their share of problems of course. They need to be more responsive to their customers. They need to spend more time consider work-flow rather than expecting customers to bend their practices around the system. They need to retain talent longer. Hiring fresh graduates from BC and then losing them to the consulting world a couple of years later is really annoying for customers.

What are your thoughts on Meditech? I look forward to reading more perspectives in the comments.

May 19, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus.