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Healthcare Security is Scaring Hospital CIOs

Posted on November 16, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is sponsored by Samsung Business. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

Coming out of the CHIME CIO Forum, I had a chance to mix and mingle with hundreds of hospital CIOs. There was one major theme at the conference: security. If you asked these hospital CIOs what was keeping them up at night, I’m sure that almost every one of them would say security. They see it as a major challenge and the job is never done.

I had more than one CIO tell me that breaches of their healthcare system are going to happen. That’s why it’s extremely important to have a 2 prong security strategy in healthcare that includes both creating security barriers and also a mitigation and response strategy.

One of the most challenging pieces of security identified by these healthcare CIOs was the proliferation of endpoints. That includes the proliferation of devices including mobile devices and the increase in the number of users using these technologies. There was far less concern about the mobile devices since there are some really deeply embedded software and hardware security built into mobile devices like Samsung’s Knox which has made mobile device security a lot easier to implement. The same can’t be said for the number of people using these devices. One hospital CIO described it as 21,000 points of vulnerability when he talked about the 21,000 people who worked at his organization. Sadly, there’s no one software solution to prevent human error.

This is why we see so much investment in security awareness programs and breach detection. Your own staff are often your biggest vulnerability. Training them is a good start and can prevent some disasters, but the malware has gotten so sophisticated that it’s really impossible to completely stop. That’s why you need great software that can detect when a breach has occurred so you can deal with it quickly.

On the one hand, it’s one of the most exciting times to be in healthcare IT. We have so much more data available to us that we can use to improve care. However, with all that data and technology comes an increased need to make sure that data and technology is kept secure. The good news is that many hospital boards have woken up to this fact and are finally funding security efforts as a priority for their organization. Is your organization prepared?

For more content like this, follow Samsung on Insights, Twitter, LinkedIn , YouTube and SlideShare.

Hospital CIOs Say Better Data Security Is Key Goal

Posted on November 9, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

A new study has concluded that while they obviously have other goals, an overwhelming majority of healthcare CIOs see data protection as their key objective for the near future. The study, which was sponsored by Spok and administered by CHIME, more than 100 IT leaders were polled on their perspective on communications and healthcare.

In addition to underscoring the importance of data security efforts, the study also highlighted the extent to which CIOs are being asked to add new functions and wear new hats (notably patient satisfaction management).

Goals and investments
When asked what business goals they expected to be focused on for the next 18 months, the top goal of 12 possible options was “strengthening data security,” which was chosen by 81%. “Increasing patient satisfaction” followed relatively closely at 70%, and “improving physician satisfaction” was selected by 65% of respondents.

When asked which factors were most important in making investments in communications-related technologies for their hospital, the top factor of 11 possible options was “best meets clinician/organizational needs” with 82% selecting that choice, followed by “ease of use for end users (e.g. physician/nurse) at 80% and “ability to integrate with current systems (e.g. EHR) at 75%.

When it came to worfklows they hoped to support with better tools, “care coordination for treatment planning” was the clear leader, chosen by 67% of respondents, followed by patient discharge (48%), “patient handoffs within hospital” (46%) and “patient handoffs between health services and facilities” chosen by 40% of respondents selected.

Mobile developments
Turning to mobile, Spok asked healthcare CIOs which of nine technology use cases were driving the selection and deployment of mobile apps. The top choices, by far, were “secure messaging in communications among care team” at 84% and “EHR access/integrations” with 83%.

A significant number of respondents (68%) said they were currently in the process of rolling out a secure texting solution. Respondents said their biggest challenges in doing so were “physician adoption/stakeholder buy-in” at 60% and “technical setup and provisioning” at 40%. A substantial majority (78%) said they’d judge the success of their rollout by the rate the solution was adopted by by physicians.

Finally, when Spok asked the CIOs to take a look at the future and predict which issues will be most important to them three years from now, the top-rated choice was “patient centered care,” which was chosen by 29% of respondents,” “EHR integrations” and “business intelligence.”

A couple of surprises
While much of this is predictable, I was surprised by a couple things.

First, the study doesn’t seem to have been designed for statistical significance, it’s still worth noting that so many CIOs said improving patient satisfaction was one of their top three goals for the next 18 months. I’m not sure what they can do to achieve this end, but clearly they’re trying. (Exactly what steps they should take is a subject for another article.)

Also, I didn’t expect to see so many CIOs engaged in rolling out secure texting, partly because I would’ve expected such rollouts to already have been in place at this point, and partly because I assume that more CIOs would be more focused on higher-level mobile apps (such as EHR interfaces). I guess that while mobile clinical integration efforts are maturing, many healthcare facilities aren’t ready to take them on yet.

Are CIOs Now Vendor Management Organizations?

Posted on October 21, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Over my past 11 years blogging on healthcare IT, I’ve seen a dramatic shift in the role a CIO plays in healthcare organizations. This was highlighted really well to me in a recent interview I did with Steve Prather, CEO of Dizzion. He commented that hospital CIOs are now mostly vendor management organizations.

I thought this was the perfect way to describe the shift. One challenge with this shift is that many hospital CEOs haven’t realized that this is what’s happening. In many hospital executives minds, the CIO is still generating code, implementing servers, network switches, rolling out desktops, and cabling. In most cases, this couldn’t be further from the truth. Yes, the CIO still has to make sure there’s a high quality network, servers, and desktops, but that does little to describe the work a CIO actually does.

Instead of getting into the nitty gritty, most CIOs have become professional vendor managers. This has become the reality as most of what people think of IT (servers, desktop, networks, email, etc) have become commodity services. There’s very little strategic advantage to do these things in-house. They’ve become such commodity services that it costs much less to outsource many of these services to an outside vendor.

What does this mean for the CIO? Instead of being Microsoft or Cisco certified, they need to be well versed in relationship management. That’s a big shift in philosophy and a very different skill set. In fact, most people who have those type of tech skills and certification are people that can struggle with relationships. There are exceptions, but that’s generally the case. CIOs that can’t handle relationships are going to suffer going forward.

Lest we think that this is a change that’s specific to healthcare, it’s not. This shifting CIO role is happening across every industry. In fact, it highlights why it’s not a bad idea to consider CIOs from outside of healthcare. If you can’t find a CIO who has healthcare experience, you could still find a great CIO from outside healthcare as long as they have the right relationship management skills.

E-Patient Update: Hospitals Should Share Ransomware Updates

Posted on October 14, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

A few weeks ago, a California hospital quietly fended off a ransomware attack without paying a ransom to the attackers. According to Health Leaders Media, Keck Medical Center of USC was hit with a ransomware assault on servers at two hospitals, but managed to fix the problem and retrieve its data.

Employees at Keck Hospital of USC and Norris Comprehensive Cancer Care found ransomware on two servers on August 1, said Keck Hospitals CEO Rod Hanners in a statement on the matter. The attack encrypted files on the servers, which made their data unavailable to hospital employees. However, Hanners reported, the hospitals had no evidence of a breach of patient information.

Still, given that some sensitive information was contained in folders encrypted by the malware, USC notified patients about the breach, Health Leaders reports. Data that could (at least theoretically) have been accessed by the attackers included names and dates of birth, health information such as treatment and diagnosis information and some Social Security numbers.

If what I’ve read is accurate, the crew at Keck did a great job. They got things under control very quickly, and chose to do the right thing in notifying patients about the breach. (And in all truth, the attack might not have been much of a big deal — perhaps one launched by a script kiddie using Ransomware as a Service tools — which could explain why the hospitals seem to be relatively unruffled.) Still, my feeling is that they could have communicated more.

A patient’s perspective

As I ponder the events above, I do wonder whether the professionals managing this particular ransomware attack understand what it’s like to be on the receiving end of a ransomware episode. So here’s a few things to consider from a patient’s perspective:

  • Ransomware is scary: While I’m healthcare technology writer and somewhat familiar with ransomware attacks, they are still new to most of the public. They may turn out to be just another infection vector for your network, but they come across as a dark force to consumers. Be prepared to educate and calm us.
  • People don’t know what to expect: I was due to have a cardiac procedure done by a doctor affiliated with Washington, D.C.-based MedStar Health a couple of weeks after it suffered a ransomware attack. While the news media made it clear that the hospital chain was paralyzed for a time, nobody bothered to tell me what the impact of this paralysis would be. It would have been better if MedStar facilities and doctors reached out to patients in immediate and near-term need of care to clarify.
  • We need progress reports: Clearly, the Keck attack didn’t amount to much, but other ransomware attacks, such as the MedStar incident, can’t be resolved overnight. As patients, we need to know roughly how long our providers may be at less than full capacity. Keep us updated or you’ll lose our trust.

With any luck, healthcare organizations will continue to improve their ability to fight back ransomware attacks, and in time, be prepared to treat them as little more than road bumps in their security efforts. But until then, it makes sense to pull out all the stops and keep patients extra well-informed.

Getting the Team in an EHR State of Mind

Posted on September 23, 2016 I Written By

For the past twenty years, I been working with healthcare organizations to implement technologies and improve business processes for nearly twenty years. During that time, I have had the opportunity to lead major transformation initiatives including implementation of EHR and ERP systems as well as design and build of shared service centers. I have worked with many of the largest healthcare providers in the United States as well as many academic and children's hospitals. In this blog I will be discussing my experiences and ideas and encourage everyone to share your own as well in the comments.

Recently I had the opportunity to do something different, fun, and unexpected – I opened a team meeting with a music video.

I am currently leading an EHR implementation. Each month, I hold a meeting of the nearly 80 hospital staff members who are part of the project. The meetings combine sharing information about the project with each other, team building activities, and teaching them about change management, process improvement, and team dynamics techniques. I am always looking for a way to make each meeting interesting and memorable.

This month I wanted to initiate a good dialog in the meeting about a topic I wanted to address head-on: Why do Physicians Hate EHRs? And what are we, as a team, going to do about it to make our physicians love their EHR?

It reminded me of a great video crated by a physician right here in Las Vegas, ZDoggMD, whose videos I found through Healthcarescene.com. Viewing it again, it was indeed the perfect way to set the stage for this discussion. Fun, entertaining and such an accurate representation of how physicians feel about these applications.

The video itself got the team excited, motivated, and laughing – and led to one of the most engaging, productive, and thought-provoking conversations we have had on the project.

For the project leaders out there – I would recommend trying this type of technique with your teams.

For any physician or anyone else who has used an EHR and has not seen this music video, enjoy and share if it represents your point of view about EHR applications:

If you’d like to receive future posts by Brian in your inbox, you can subscribe to future Healthcare Optimization Scene posts here. Be sure to also read the archive of previous Healthcare Optimization Scene posts.

Bad Handwriting Could Cost a Doctor His License

Posted on September 16, 2016 I Written By

For the past twenty years, I been working with healthcare organizations to implement technologies and improve business processes for nearly twenty years. During that time, I have had the opportunity to lead major transformation initiatives including implementation of EHR and ERP systems as well as design and build of shared service centers. I have worked with many of the largest healthcare providers in the United States as well as many academic and children's hospitals. In this blog I will be discussing my experiences and ideas and encourage everyone to share your own as well in the comments.

I admit that I don’t have very good handwriting. My signature is no better, and often leads people to ask if I am a doctor. Because it is commonly known that doctors don’t excel at handwriting skills. Thankfully, I rarely hand-write anything anymore. With computers, I can write quickly while still producing a result that is easy to read.

One benefit of an EHR solution is that we don’t have to worry about deciphering handwritting! But for one Nevada doctor, poor penmanship may lead to the loss of his medical license!

Read this story in the Review Journal for more information or this excerpt of the situation below:

The Nevada State Medical Board has formally threatened to revoke the medical license of Dr. James Gabroy, a 69-year-old Henderson internist who has never had malpractice or professional incompetence problems, nor has he ever had sexual misconduct, patient abandonment or fraudulent billing issues.

why is the board taking action against Gabroy — punishment ranges from a $5,000 fine to license revocation — with a Sept. 28 hearing scheduled in Reno?

His handwriting.

Citing confidentiality, Ed Cousineau, the board’s executive director, won’t stray far from the Oct. 23, 2015, board complaint that alleges the medical records of three unnamed patients were illegible, inaccurate and incomplete.

Are we heading for an environment where you’ll have to have an EHR in order to have a medical license?

If you’d like to receive future posts by Brian in your inbox, you can subscribe to future Healthcare Optimization Scene posts here. Be sure to also read the archive of previous Healthcare Optimization Scene posts.

10 Reasons for Full EHR Data Migration – Tackling EHR & EMR Transition Series

Posted on September 7, 2016 I Written By

top-10-reasons-for-ehr-data-migration

(Check Out the Full Top 10 Reasons for EHR Data Migration Infographic)

At Galen Healthcare Solutions we’ve found some important considerations and benefits during EHR data migration, including:

  • Legacy application licensing, and on-going support & maintenance.
  • Avoidance of data redundancy and improvement of data integrity.
  • Productivity and efficiency gains through enhanced clinical decisions support and consolidated clinical data access.
  • Enhanced regulatory reporting with programs including PQRS & PCMH.

When undertaking an EHR replacement project, there is a general misconception that the all of underlying patient clinical data is migrated systematically with ease. However, due to cost and complexity constraints, in most cases only patient demographics and basic clinical data elements are migrated to the new EHR system. In these cases, the legacy system is left operational in a read-only capacity; used as “system of record” for compliance, audits and responses for requests for information. Contrary to popular thought, this approach can actually end up being costlier than pursuing EHR data migration and archival, especially considering clinical efficiencies and patient care benefits associated with each of the latter.
legacy-ehr-data-migration
Understanding available EHR data migration & EHR data archival options and processes are vital to EHR replacement. Not doing so potentially leaves providers and staff inaccurate, unusable or missing data at go-live, compromising patient care. It’s important to evaluate scoping considerations, including options for import of discrete and non-discrete migrated data the new EHR systems provides, expertise of internal or external resources to migrate the data, and data retention requirements. Typically, the data elements & amount/duration of data to be migrated vs. archived is driven by organizational requirements related to continuity of care, patient safety, and population-based reporting requirements. Further, care needs to be taken to ensure data integrity when migrating clinical data – mapping nomenclatures and dictionaries where possible to avoid duplication, and facilitating reconciliation of the data to the existing chart in the target system.

At the heart of the EHR data migration process, it’s important that clinically driven workflows across various user roles are supported, transitioned, and maintained to the greatest extent possible. EHR data migration and archival allows for successful retirement of antiquated legacy applications, and ensures seamless and successful transition to the new EHR system.

Evaluate options, define scope and formulate a strategy for EHR data migration by downloading our EHR Migration Whitepaper.

About Justin Campbell
Justin is Vice President, Strategy, at Galen Healthcare Solutions. He is responsible for market intelligence, segmentation, business and market development and competitive strategy. Justin has been consulting in Health IT for over 10 years, guiding clients in the implementation, integration and optimization of clinical systems. He has been on the front lines of system replacement and data migration and is passionate about advancing interoperability in healthcare and harnessing analytical insights to realize improvements in patient care. Justin can be found on Twitter at @TJustinCampbell and LinkedIn.

About Galen Healthcare Solutions
Galen Healthcare Solutions is an award-winning, #1 in KLAS healthcare IT technical & professional services and solutions company providing high-skilled, cross-platform expertise and proud sponsor of the Tackling EHR & EMR Transition Series. For over a decade, Galen has partnered with more than 300 specialty practices, hospitals, health information exchanges, health systems and integrated delivery networks to provide high-quality, expert level IT consulting services including strategy, optimization, data migration, project management, and interoperability. Galen also delivers a suite of fully integrated products that enhance, automate, and simplify the access and use of clinical patient data within those systems to improve cost-efficiency and quality outcomes. For more information, visit www.galenhealthcare.com. Connect with us on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn.

Hospitals Can Learn From Low Outpatient EHR Turnover Rates

Posted on September 2, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

According to new data from HIMSS, almost 80% of freestanding outpatient facilities have an EHR in place, a figure which has shot up 30% over the past five years. This is no big surprise, given that the growth tracks neatly with the Meaningful Use program run. What seems to take HIMSS analysts aback, on the other hand, is that only a scant 15% of outpatient facilities surveyed seem ready to replace or purchase an EHR,

Why are learned minds at HIMSS taken aback by this data? Well, for one thing, hospitals have set their expectations. And over the last couple of years, hospitals have been dumping their existing EHRs at a rapid pace, with many large hospitals switching to newer systems with population health capabilities.

A recent Black Book study suggests that many hospitals weren’t thrilled with the results of even their lastest EHR investment, with some even considering yet another switch. In other words, 2,300 hospital executives and IT staff interviewed weren’t seeing much benefit from their ongoing, massive investment of time and money.

What’s more, HIMSS analysts don’t seem to have taken a close look at how EHR purchasing patterns vary between the inpatient and outpatient setting. And that’s worth doing. After all, if outpatient buyers and inpatient buyers are making strikingly different decisions about how to spend on IT, the reasons for this disparity probably matter.

Important lessons

I don’t have any statistical data to back this up, but I do have a fairly straightforward theory on why hospitals seemingly do worse at investing in EHRs than outpatient facilities. I believe that EHRs are collapsing under the weight of trying to manage entire enterprises.

My sense is that outpatient EHR buyers aren’t just clinging to their existing systems due to inertia or lack of capital (though these factors doubtless come into play). Rather, they’re in a better position to take advantage of the systems they acquire than hospital IT departments.

For most medical groups, their mission is more straightforward and their management structure flatter than that of hospitals, which are having to be all things to all people of late. And this allows them to leverage an EHR more effectively.

To me, this suggests the following takeaways:

  • Hospitals might benefit from an EHR that’s focused more on supporting individual departments/service lines (including outpatient services) than a master enterprise system
  • If EHRs supported individual departments in a modular fashion, and the modules could be switched out between vendors, hospitals could update only the modules they needed to update
  • Hospitals could learn something from how their independent practice partners choose and integrate EHRs

Industry activity clearly suggests that CIOs back a more modular approach to solving clinical problems, and this could help them build a more flexible infrastructure that doesn’t get outmoded as quickly. And if outpatient buying patterns offer additional insights into decentralizing EHRs, it’d be smart to leverage them.

Thoughts On Hospital Telecommunications Infrastructure

Posted on August 31, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

Given the prevalence of broadband telecom networks in place today, hospital IT leaders may feel secure – that their networks can handle whatever demands are thrown at them. But given the progress of new health IT initiatives and data use, they still might face bandwidth problems. And as healthcare technical architect Lanny Hart notes in a piece for SearchHealthIT, the networks need to accommodate new security demands as well.

These days, he notes healthcare networks must carry not only more-established data and voice data, but also growing volumes of EMR traffic. Not only that, hospital IT execs need to plan for connected device traffic and patient/visitor access to Wi-Fi, along with protecting the network from increasingly sophisticated data thieves hungry for health data.

So what’s a healthcare CIO to do when thinking about building out hospital telecommunications infrastructure?  Here’s some of Hart’s suggestions:

  • When building your network, keep cybersecurity at the top of your priorities, whether you handle it at the network layer or on applications layered over the network.
  • Use an efficient network topology. At most, create a hub-and-spoke design rather than a daisy chain of linked sub-networks and switches.
  • Avoid establishing a single point of failure for networks. Use two separate runs of fiber or cable from the network’s edge switches to ensure redundancy and increase uptime.
  • Use virtual local area networks for PACS and for separate hospital departments.
  • Segment access to your virtual networks – including your guest Wi-Fi service – allowing only authorized users to access individual networks.
  • Build as much wireless network connectivity into new hospital construction, and blend wireless and wired networks when you upgrade networks in older buildings.
  • When planning network infrastructure, bear in mind that hospital networks can’t be completely wireless yet, because big hardware devices like CT scans and MRIs can’t run off of wireless connections.
  • Bigger hospitals that use real-time location services should factor that traffic in when planning network capacity.

In addition to all of these considerations, I’d argue that hospital network planners need to keep a close eye on changes in network usage that affect where demand is going. For example, consider the ongoing shift from desktop computers to mobile devices use of cellular networks have on network bandwidth requirements.

If physicians and other clinical staffers are using cell connections to roam, they’re probably transferring large files and perhaps using video as well. (Of course, their video use is likely to increase as telemedicine rollouts move ahead.)

If you’re paying for those connections, why not evaluate whether there’s ways you could save by extending Internet connectivity? After all, closing gaps in your wireless network could both improve your clinicians’ mobile experience and help you understand how they work. It never hurts to know where the data is headed!

Decommissioning Legacy EHR systems with Data Archival – Tackling EHR & EMR Transition Series

Posted on August 25, 2016 I Written By

EMR Data Archival

In their latest infographic (Check out the full infographic), Galen Healthcare Solutions provides critical information and statistics surrounding EMR data archival including:

  • Healthcare Data Growth
  • Healthcare Data Archival Drivers
    • Mergers & Acquisitions
    • Legacy System Retention Requirements
  • Healthcare Data Archival Benefits
  • Average Patient Digital Footprint
  • Industry Leading Archival Solution

Healthcare Information Technology leaders face challenges in keeping pace with new initiatives and consequently, managing a growing collection of legacy systems. With drivers including mergers & acquisitions, vendor consolidation, application dissatisfaction and product sunsets, it’s estimated that 50% of health systems are projected to be on second-generation technology by 2020, according to the IDC. As these new systems are implemented, multiple legacy systems are left behind, requiring healthcare IT staff to provide support and maintain access.

The strategy of keeping a patchwork of legacy systems running in order to maintain access to data is risky, resource intensive and can be quite costly given licensing, support, and maintenance needs. Decommissioning legacy systems with a proven archival system reduces cost and labor, minimizes risk, ensures compliance, simplifies access and consolidates data.

  • Reduce Costs: Streamlining the long-term storage of historical PHI now will save money in the long-run. Not only will it reduce costs paid for the support and technical maintenance of the legacy system, but it will also save on training new staff on the new system over the next 7-25 years. In addition, incorporating data archival efforts with a discrete data migration provides significant economies of scale.
  • Minimize Risk: Preserving historical patient data is the responsibility of every provider. As servers and operating systems age, they become more prone to data corruption or loss. The archiving of patient data to a simplified and more stable storage solution ensures long-term access to the right information when it’s needed for an audit or legal inquiry. Incorporating a data archive avoids the costly and cumbersome task of a full data conversion.
  • Ensure Compliance: Providers are required to retain data for nearly a decade or more past the date of service. In addition, the costs of producing record for e-Discovery range from $5K to $30K/ GB (Source: Minnesota Journal of Law, Science & Technology). Check with your legal counsel, HIM Director, medical society or AHIMA on medical record retention requirements that affect the facility type or practice specialty in your state.
  • Simplify Access: We all want data at the touch of a button. Gone are the days of storing historical patient printouts in a binder or inactive medical charts in a basement or storage unit. By scanning and archiving medical documents, data, and images, the information becomes immediately accessible to those who need it.
  • Consolidate Data: Decades worth of data from disparate legacy software applications is archived for immediate access via any browser-based workstation or device. Also, medical document scanning and archiving provides access to patient paper charts.

Because the decision to decommission can impact many people and departments, organizations require a well-documented plan and associated technology to ensure data integrity.

Download the full archival whitepaper to understand the drivers that impact archival scope specific to both the industry and your organization.

About Justin Campbell
Justin is Vice President, Strategy, at Galen Healthcare Solutions. He is responsible for market intelligence, segmentation, business and market development and competitive strategy. Justin has been consulting in Health IT for over 10 years, guiding clients in the implementation, integration and optimization of clinical systems. He has been on the front lines of system replacement and data migration and is passionate about advancing interoperability in healthcare and harnessing analytical insights to realize improvements in patient care. Justin can be found on Twitter at @TJustinCampbell

About Galen Healthcare Solutions
Galen Healthcare Solutions is an award-winning, #1 in KLAS healthcare IT technical & professional services and solutions company providing high-skilled, cross-platform expertise and proud sponsor of the Tackling EHR & EMR Transition Series. For over a decade, Galen has partnered with more than 300 specialty practices, hospitals, health information exchanges, health systems and integrated delivery networks to provide high-quality, expert level IT consulting services including strategy, optimization, data migration, project management, and interoperability. Galen also delivers a suite of fully integrated products that enhance, automate, and simplify the access and use of clinical patient data within those systems to improve cost-efficiency and quality outcomes. For more information, visit www.galenhealthcare.com. Connect with us on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn.