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The Rise of the “EHR Value” Equation at Hospitals

Posted on July 1, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve heard a lot of people talk about how it will be impossible for ambulatory EHR vendors like athenahealth and eCW to break into the acute care market. For those following along at home, both companies have announced that they’re building out their EHR software for the acute care market. These are big bets by both companies, but I think many people don’t realize the advantage these companies will have going into the very expensive hospital EHR market.

Companies like eCW and athenahealth will be able to come into a hospital with a native cloud platform that will let them offer some really aggressive pricing. When you’re paying $50+ million for an EHR (or $9+ billion for some), there’s a lot of wiggle room for a new entrant to enter the fray at a much lower cost point. That lower cost point will totally change the EHR value equation for hospitals. In fact, these cloud based hospital EHR will likely be able to compete effectively against a legacy EHRs upgrade costs alone.

Don’t believe this is possible? Take a look at the story about Delta Regional Hospital returning to MEDITECH. Why did they do it? Thomas Moore, vice president and CFO at Delta said, “We were looking for a system with a lower cost of ownership without sacrificing quality.” Moore later added this comment, “MEDITECH is a company that truly understands the meaning of value.”

During the wild west phase of EHR where the industry was propped up by $36 billion in stimulus money, everyone had the perfect rationale for spending hundreds of millions (and even billions) on EHR software. As we return to a more rational market we’re going to see hospital CIOs starting to place a much larger emphasis on EHR value. Showing that value is going to be hard for some of the larger EHR vendors who’ve charged hundreds of millions and even billions of dollars to their customers. Plus, it will be hard for them to lower their price.

In one online thread I participate on, a bunch of people were bashing Delta Regional Hospital’s decision to go back to MEDITECH. However, a former CIO offered this great insight:

Ya gotta spend time in a Meditech shop. It’s not flashy, but from a value perspective (and it does a lot more than just EHR), it’s hard to beat.

The same is going to be true with acute care EHR from eCW and athenahealth, but they’ll have some of the sexy factor as well. In the acute care EHR world I believe we’re just entering the new world of EHR value. Those who can tell the story of the value they’ve created for customers are going to win. Plus, we’re going to see a fierce battle from new entrants who are going to try and undercut the market. Think about how the EHR value equation changes when you can charge even $75 million instead of $100 million. That’s a game changer.

Operationalizing Health IT Discoveries

Posted on June 24, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve been talking a lot lately with people about how we take the health IT discoveries made at one hospital and apply them to another hospital. In a recent conversation I had with Jonathan Sheldon from Oracle, he highlighted that “Many organizations don’t care about research, but just want a product that works.”

I agree completely with this comment from Jonathan. While there are some very large healthcare organizations that do a lot of research, there are even more healthcare organizations that just want to see patients in the best way possible. They just want to implement the research that other organizations have done. They just want something that works.

The problem for big companies like Oracle, SAP, Tableau, etc is that they have the technology to scale up many of these health IT discoveries, but they aren’t doing the discovery themselves. In fact, most of them never will dive into the discovery of which healthcare data really matters.

In order to solve this, I’ve seen all of these organizations working on some sort of partnership between IT companies and healthcare research organizations. The IT company provides the technology and the commercialization of the product and the healthcare research organization provides the research knowledge on the most effective techniques.

While this all sounds very simple and logical, it’s actually much harder in practice. Taking your customer and turning them into a partner is much harder than it looks. Most healthcare organizations know how to be customers. It takes a unique healthcare organization to be an effective partner. However, this is exactly what we have to do if we want to operationalize the health IT discoveries these research organizations make.

We’re going to have to make this a reality. There’s no way that one organization can discover everything they need to discover. Healthcare is too complex as it is today. Plus, we’re just getting started with things like genomic medicine and health sensors which is going to make healthcare at least an order of magnitude more complex.

Creating Alliances with Large Health IT Vendors – Benefits and Challenges

Posted on June 13, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Healthcare Scene recently sat down with Nancy Hannan, Philips Relationship Director at Augusta University Health System (formerly known as Georgia Regents) to talk about their alliance with Philips Healthcare and the impact it’s had on their healthcare organization.

Along with talking about the benefits and challenges of creating a long term contract with a healthcare IT vendor, we also dive into the details of how medical device standardization has impacted their organization. Not to be left out, we also talk about how this relationship has impacted patients and doctors. If your organization is looking at how to standardize your medical equipment, this interview will give you some insight into creating a long term alliance with your vendor.

In the second part of my interview with Nancy Hannan, Philips Relationship Director at Augusta University Health System (formerly known as Georgia Regents) we discuss how they’re taking the lessons learned from the Philips alliance and applying them to their agreement with Cerner. We also talk about how cybersecurity is better having a vendor representative on site like they have with Philips.

Epic Install Triggers Loss At MD Anderson

Posted on May 31, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

Surprising pretty much no one, another healthcare organization has attributed adverse financial outcomes largely to its Epic installation. In this case, the complaining party is the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, which attributes its recent shortfall to both EMR costs and lower revenues. The news follows a long series of cost overruns, losses and budget crises by other healthcare providers implementing Epic of late.

According to Becker’s Hospital CFO, MD Anderson reported adjusted income of $122.9 million during that period a 56.6% drop over the seven-month period ending March 31. During that period, the cancer center’s wages and salaries climbed, and Epic-related consulting costs were climbed as well. This follows a $9.9 million operating loss for the first quarter of the 2016 fiscal year, which the University of Texas attributed to higher-than-expected EMR expenses.

MD Anderson announced its choice of Epic in spring 2013, and went live on the system in March of this year as anticipated. The cancer center’s rollout was guided by Epic veteran Chris Belmont, the center’s CIO, who implemented Epic across 10 hospitals and more than three dozen clinics for New Orleans-based Ochsner Health System.

The organization didn’t announce what it was spending on the Epic install, but we all know it doesn’t come cheap. However, one would think the University of Texas health system could afford the investment. According to EHR Intelligence, the Texas health system ranks in the 99th percentile for net patient revenue in the US, with total revenue topping $5.58 billion.

And UT leaders seem to have been prepared for the bump, reporting that they’d planned for a material impact to revenues and expenses as a result of the Epic implementation. The system didn’t announce any staff cuts, hiring freezes or other budget-trimming moves resulting from these financial issues.

Having said all this, however, no organization wants to see its income drop. So what actually happened?

For example, when the UT system reports that a drop in patient revenues contributed to the drop in income, what does that mean? Does this refer to scheduled drops in patient volume, planned for ahead of time, or problems billing for services? I’d be interested to know if the center managed to keep on top of revenue cycle management during the transition.

Another question I have is what caused the unanticipated expenses. Did they come from contract disputes with Epic? Unexpected technical problems? Markups on consulting services? Or did the organization have to pour money into the project to meet its go-live deadline? There’s a lot of ways to generate costs, and I’d love to get some granular information on what happened.

Also, I wonder what steps UT leaders will take to avoid unexpected expenses in the future. While it may have learned some lessons from the problems it’s had so far, there’s no guarantee that it won’t face of the costly problems going forward.

If, perchance, and the system has figured out how to stay in the black with its Epic investment, it could sell that secret to cover its IT expenses for years. I’m betting other systems would pay good money for that information!

Why Remote Patient Monitoring and Treatment Is So Important to Healthcare

Posted on I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is sponsored by Samsung Business. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

When you think about healthcare, you often think of a visit to a doctor’s office or hospital. No doubt that is healthcare as we know it today, but that’s quickly changing. Doctors and hospitals need to wake up to the new healthcare world where you’re paid to keep patients healthy as opposed to treating the chief complaint.

It’s not surprising that we do a poor job managing patients’ health when you consider how much time our current healthcare providers get to spend with the patient. Most patient visits are between 15-30 minutes. In fact, one study showed that doctors see a patient every 11 minutes on average.

Let’s be generous and say that each one of us spends 15 minutes with a doctor once a month and that’s likely being generous for most of us that are even relatively healthy. My simple math says that would add up to us spending about 180 minutes (3 hours) each year with our doctor. There are 8760 hours in a year and so that means we spend about 0.0342% of our life with our doctor each year.

Is it any wonder that our doctors only have time to treat our chief complaint and can’t really help us be and remain healthy when they see us so little?

This simple analysis is why remote patient monitoring is so important to healthcare. We spend exponentially more time outside of our current healthcare system than we do in it. Our understanding of what happens outside the hospital and doctor’s office must change if we’re going to make a dent in the trillions of dollars we spend on healthcare.

The great thing is that we’re starting to see a reinvention of health care with things like mobile medical apps. Previous to the smartphone, how would you have monitored a patient remotely? Sure, we had some bluetooth connected devices that we sent home and people attached to their computers, but that was always cumbersome and fraught with technical challenges. Now we have an always on, always connected device that’s nearly attached to most of us at all times. Many of these devices even come with built-in health sensors. These devices are making remote patient monitoring possible

I don’t fault doctors for not really treating the entire patient in the past. First, they performed the services they were paid to provide. They weren’t paid or given the time to treat the whole patient. Second, the technology wasn’t available for them to scale their remote patient monitoring and treatment efforts. However, we’re seeing both of these things changing as we speak.

Now that I’ve made the case for remote patient monitoring and treatment, what technologies and approaches have you seen be most successful in this space?

For more content like this, follow Samsung on Insights, Twitter, LinkedIn , YouTube and SlideShare.

Avoiding Revenue Crunches During EMR Transitions

Posted on May 23, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

Most healthcare leaders know, well before their EMR rollouts, that clinical productivity and billings may fall for a while as the implementation proceeds. That being said, it seems a surprising number are caught off guard by the extent to which payments can be lost or delayed due to technical issues during the transition. This is particularly alarming as more and more hospitals are looking at switching EHR.

Far too often, those responsible for revenue cycle issues live in a silo that doesn’t communicate well with hospital IT leadership, and the results can be devastating financially. For example, consider the case of Maine Medical Center, which took a major loss after it launched its Epic EMR in 2012, due in part to substantial problems with billing for services.

But according to McKesson execs, there’s a few steps health systems and hospitals can take to reduce the impact this transition has in your revenue cycle. Their recommendations include the following:

  • Involve revenue cycle managers in your EMR migration. Doing so can help integrate RCM and EMR technologies successfully.
  • Create a revenue cycle EMR team. The team should include the CFO, revenue cycle leaders from patient access and reimbursement, vendor reps and someone familiar with revenue cycle systems. Once this team is assembled, establish a meeting schedule, team roles and goals for participants. It’s particularly important to designate a project manager for the revenue cycle portion of your EMR rollout.
  • Before the implementation, research how RCM processes will be affected by the by the rollout, particularly how the new EMR will impact claims management workflow, speed of payment and staff workloads. Check out how the implementation will affect processes such as eligibility verification, registration data quality assurance, preauthorization and medical necessity management, pre-claim editing and remittance management.
  • Pay close attention to key performance indicators throughout the transition. These include service-to-payment velocity, Days Not Final Billed, charge trends and denial rates.

The article also recommends bringing on consultants to help with the transition. Being that McKesson is a health IT vendor, I’m not at all surprised that this is the case. But there’s something to the idea nonetheless. Self-serving though such a recommendation may be, it may help to bring in a consultant who has an outside view of these issues and is not blinkered by departmental loyalties.

That being said, over the longer term healthcare leaders need to think about ways to help RCM and IT execs see eye to eye. It’s all well and good to create temporary teams to smooth the transition to EMR use. But my guess is that these teams will dissolve quickly once the worst of the rollout is over. After all, while IT and revenue cycle management departments have common interests, their jobs differ significantly.

The bottom line is that to avoid needless RCM issues, the IT department and revenue cycle leaders need to be aligned in their larger goals. This can be fostered by financial rewards, common performance goals, cultural expectations and more, but regardless of how it happens, these departments need to be interested in working together. However, unless rewards and expectations change, they have little incentive to do so. It’s about time hospital and health system leaders address problem directly.

Health IT Software Must Be Meaningful and Pleasurable

Posted on April 27, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of the most dynamic healthcare CIO’s is Shafiq Rab, MD, MPH, Vice President and CIO at Hackensack UMC. Healthcare Scene was lucky enough to talk with him at the DataMotion Health booth during HIMSS 2016. Dr. Rab talked with us about Hackensack UMC’s approach to healthcare IT innovation. He offered some great insights into how to approach any healthcare IT project, about Hackensack University Medical Center’s “selfie” app, and their efforts to use Direct and FHIR to empower the patient.

I love that Dr. Rab leads off the discussion with the idea that healthcare IT software that they implement must be meaningful and pleasurable. Far too many health IT software miss these important goals. They aren’t very meaningful and they’re definitely not pleasurable.

Dr. Rab’s focus on the patient is also worth highlighting. Health IT would be in a much better place if there was a great focus on the patient along with making health IT software meaningful and pleasurable. Thanks Dr. Rab and DataMotion Health for doing this interview with us.

Tablets Star In My Fantasy ED Visit

Posted on April 1, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

As some readers may know, in addition to being your HIT hostess, I cope with some unruly chronic conditions which have landed me in the ED several times of late.

During the hours I recently spent being examined and treated at these hospitals, I found myself fantasizing about how the process of my care would change for the better if the right technologies were involved. Specifically, these technologies would give me a voice, better information and a higher comfort level.

So here, below, is my step-by-step vision of how I would like to have participated in my care, using a tablet as a fulcrum. These steps assume the patient is ambulatory and fundamentally functional; I realize that things would need to be much different if the person comes in by ambulance or isn’t capable of participating in their care.

My Dream (Tablet-Enabled) ED Care Process

  1. I walk through the front door of the hospital and approach the registration desk. Near the desk, there’s a smaller tablet station where I enter my basic identity data, and verify that identity with a fingerprint scan. The fingerprint scan verification also connects me to my health insurance data, assuming it’s on file. (If not I can scan my insurance card and ID, and create a system-wide identity status by logging a corresponding fingerprint record.)
  2. The same terminal poses a series of screening questions about my reasons for walking into the ED, and the responses are routed to the hospital EMR. It also asks me to verify and update my current medications. The data is made available not only to the triage nurse but also to whatever physician and nurse attend me in my ED bed.
  3. When I approach the main registration desk, all the clerks have to do is put the hospital bracelet on my wrist to do a human verification that the bracelet a) contains the right patient identity and b) includes the correct date of birth for the person to which it is attached. If the clerks have any additional questions to pose — such as queries related to the patient’s need for disability accommodations  — these are addressed by another integrated app the clerk has on their desk.
  4. At that point, rather than walking back to an uncomfortable waiting room, I’m “on deck” in a comfortable triage area where every patient sits in a custom chair that automatically takes vital signs, be it by sensor, cuff or other means. In some cases, the patient’s specific malady can be addressed, by technologies such as AliveCor’s mobile cardiac monitoring tool.
  5. When the triage nurses interview me, they already have my vitals and answers to a bunch of routine clinical questions via my original tablet interaction, allowing them to focus on other issues specific to my case. In some instances this may allow the staff to move me straight to the bed and ask questions there, saving initial triage time for more complex and confusing cases.
  6. As I leave the triage area I am handed a patient tablet which I will have throughout my visit. As part of assigning me to this tablet my fingerprint will again be scanned, assuring that the information I get is intended for me.
  7. When I am settled in a patient bed in the ED, I’m given the option of either holding the tablet or placing on a swing-over bed desk which can include a Bluetooth keyboard and mouse for those that find touchscreen typing to be awkward.
  8. Not long after I am placed in the bed, the hospital system pushes a browser to the tablet screen. In the browser window are the names of the doctor assigned by case, the nurse and tech who will assist, and whenever possible, photos of the staff involved. In the case of the doctor or NP, the presentation will include a link to their professional bio. This display will also offer a summary of what the staff considers to be my problem. (The system will allow me to add to this summary if I feel the triage team has missed something important.)
  9. As the doctor, nurse and tech enter the room, an RFID chip in their badges will alert the hospital system that they have done so. Then, a related alert will be pushed to the patient tablet – and maybe to the family members’ tablet which might be part of this process — giving everyone a heads up as to how they’re going to interact with me. For example, if a tech has entered to draw blood, the system will not only identify the staff member but also the fact that they plan a blood draw, as well as what tests are being performed.
  10. If I have had in interaction with any of the staff members before, the system will note the condition the patient was diagnosed with previously when working with the clinician or tech. (For example, beside Doctor Smith’s profile I’d see that she had previously treated me for stroke-like symptoms one time, and a cardiac arrhythmia before that.)
  11. As the doctor or NP orders laboratory tests or imaging, those orders would appear on a patient progress area on the main patient ED encounter page. Patients could then click on the order for say, an MRI, and find out what the term means and how the test will work. (If a hospital wanted to be really clever, they could customize further. For example, given that many patients are frightened of MRIs, the encounter page would offer the patient a chance to click a button allowing them to request a modest dose of anti-anxiety medication.)
  12. As results from the tests roll in, the news is pushed to the patient encounter home page, scrolling links to results down like a Twitter feed. As with Twitter, all readers — including patients, clinicians and staff — should have the ability to comment on the material.
  13. When the staff is ready to discharge the patient — or the doctor has made a firm decision to admit — this news, too, will be pushed to the patient encounter homepage. This announcement will come with a button patients can click to produce a text box, in which I can type out or dictate any concerns I have about this decision.
  14. When I am discharged from the hospital, the patient encounter homepage will offer me the choice of emailing myself the discharge summary or being texted a link to the summary. (Meanwhile, if I’m being admitted, the tablet stays with me, but that’s a whole other discussion.)

OK, I’ll admit that this rather long description caters to my prejudices and personal needs, and also, that I’ve left some ideas out (especially some thoughts related to improving my interaction with on-call specialists). So tell me – does this vision make sense to you? What would you add, and what would you subtract?

P.S.  Some high-profile hospitals have put a lot of work into integrating EMRs with tablets, at least, but not in the manner I’ve described, to my knowledge.

P.S.S. No this is not an April Fool’s joke. I’d really like for someone to implement these workflows.

NYC Epic Rollout Faces Patient Safety Questions

Posted on March 30, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

In the summer of last year, we laid out for you the story of how a municipal hospital system’s Epic EMR installation had gone dramatically south since its inception. We told you how the New York City-based Health and Hospitals Corp. was struggling to cope with problems arising from its attempt to implement Epic at its 11 hospitals, four long-term care facilities, six diagnostic treatment centers and more than 70 community-based clinics.

At the time of last writing, the project budget had exploded upward from $302 million to $764 million, and the public chain’s CTO, CIO, CIO interim deputy and project head of training had been given the axe. In the unlikely event that you thought things would settle down at that point, we bring you news of further strife and bloodshed.

Apparently, a senior clinical information officer with the chain’s Elmhurst and Queens Hospital Centers has now made allegations that the way the Epic install was proceeding might pose danger to patients. A New York Post article reports that in a letter to colleagues, outgoing HHC official Charles Perry, M.D. compared the EMR implementation process to the 1986 Challenger space shuttle disaster.

In his letter, Dr. Perry apparently argued that the project must be delayed. According to the Post, he quoted from a presidential panel report on the disaster: “[For] a successful technology, reality must take precedence over public relations, for nature cannot be fooled.” Another Post article cited anonymous “insider” sources claiming that the system will crash, as the implementation is being rushed, and that the situation could lead to patient harm.

For its part, HHC has minimized the issue. A spokesperson told FierceHealthIT that Perry was associate executive director of the Elmhurst hospital and liason to the Queens Epic project, rather than being CMIO as identified by the Post. (Further intrigue?) Also, the spokesperson told FHIT that “if a patient safety issue is identified, the project will stop until it is addressed.”

Of course, the only people who truly know what’s happening with the HHC Epic implementation are not willing to go public with their allegations, so I’d argue that were obligated to take Perry’s statements with at least a grain of salt. In fact, I’d suggest that most large commercial Epic installations (and other large EHR implementations for that matter) got the scrutiny this public hospital system gets, they’d probably look pretty bad too.

On the other hand, it’s fair to say that HHC seems to crammed enough scandal into the first few years of its Epic rollout for the entire 15-year project. For the sake of the millions of people HHC serves, let’s hope that either there is not much to these critiques — or that HHC slows down enough to do the project justice.

GE Healthcare Is Still In The Game

Posted on March 14, 2016 I Written By

David is a global digital healthcare leader that is focusing on the next era of healthcare IT.  Most recently David served as the CIO at an academic medical center where he was responsible for all technology related to the three missions of education, research and patient care. David has worked for various healthcare providers ranging from academic medical centers, non-profit, and the for-profit sectors. Subscribe to David's latest CXO Scene posts here.

Below is the recent press release from GE Healthcare.  Their EMR will be used in the Rio 2016 Olympics which is a great win for GE.  The product has come a long way and they are making some great strides.  The challenge is where will the product fall in a healthcare EMR ecosystem that is predominately Epic and Cerner.   Personally I know of a few organizations that are evaluating a transition away from the GE Centricity platform due to either a merger with a bigger healthcare system that already has an enterprise EMR or they had a bad experience with Centricity and are moving on.  It will be interesting to see in the next 2-3 years how many EMR vendors we will have left.  I will definitely keep an eye on GE to see whether the recent win with the Olympic games will help create positive momentum in 2016.

LAS VEGAS–GE Healthcare announced today the International Olympic Committee (IOC) has selected the company’s Centricity Practice Solution as the official electronic medical record (EMR) to be used by the medical teams of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games. This marks the first time that all athletes and spectators at the Olympic Games will have their health interactions managed by an electronic medical record. The announcement was made at the 2016 Health Information Management Systems Society (HIMSS) conference in Las Vegas.

Centricity Practice Solution will be used for managing data related to injuries and illness for athletes competing in the games as well as spectators, officials, athlete family members and coaches who require medical assistance throughout the Rio 2016 Olympic Games. For the competitors, the data managed during the Games will be used to help drive optimal, individualized care to help athletes compete at a world-class level.

“The Olympic Games is about providing the best possible service to athletes,” said Dr. Richard Budgett, Medical and Scientific Director for the IOC. “The gold medal of medical services is something that is integrated and comprehensive: a total package. Adding access to an electronic medical record is key to our drive towards the prevention of injury. Without a proper medical, longitudinal record, it’s difficult for us to do surveillance and see what injuries are most common in certain sports. This would impact our ability to prevent and measure our effectiveness. The EMR is going to be a cornerstone for our medical services going forward.”

Centricity Practice Solution will be available in English and Portuguese and will provide access to next generation workflows, analytics and data to potentially help optimize athlete performance. The information will be analyzed to spot patterns and provide insights for future Games planning. Additionally, medical teams will be able to access diagnostic images and reports from within the EMR to assist in providing world-class care quickly and efficiently. GE’s EMR will be accessible at any of the multiple medical posts throughout the Games and at the central Polyclinic in the Olympic Village where more complex care is delivered.

“By selecting Centricity Practice Solutions EMR, the IOC is extending the clinical care and data management capabilities pioneered by the United States Olympic Committee (USOC), which has used GE’s EMR platform for the past two Olympic Games in London and Sochi,” said Jon Zimmerman, General Manager, GE Centricity Business Solutions. “Incorporating an EMR platform into the healthcare services will enable medical staff at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games access to real time data, analytics and health information to help their athletes perform at peak capabilities.”

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