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McKesson and Infor Go-To-Market Partnership – What Happens Now?

Posted on January 9, 2017 I Written By

For the past twenty years, I have been working with healthcare organizations to implement technologies and improve business processes. During that time, I have had the opportunity to lead major transformation initiatives including implementation of EHR and ERP systems as well as design and build of shared service centers. I have worked with many of the largest healthcare providers in the United States as well as many academic and children's hospitals. In this blog, I will be discussing my experiences and ideas and encourage everyone to share your own as well in the comments.

A couple weeks ago, McKesson and Infor announced a partnership that will have McKesson EIS (Enterprise Information Solutions) offering Infor Cloudsuite as their cloud-based ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning) solution for human resources, supply chain, and financials. What does each party have to gain from this partnership and what does this mean for existing customers of McKesson ERP solutions?

Infor continues to be the dominant player in the ERP space for healthcare providers. Its healthcare applications, previously known as Lawson (and probably always known as Lawson to many of us), have the largest market share with the majority of larger hospitals and healthcare systems. Its closest competitor in the past, Peoplesoft, is now owned by Oracle which is focused on developing and promoting its Fusion product and has released the final version of the Peoplesoft product. Workday, the cloud-only solution that is publicly traded and making significant strives in many industries, has won deals in human resources and financials implementations but lacks a supply chain solution, critical to any integrated ERP deployment. SAP, the largest ERP provider in the world, has a strong presence in healthcare manufacturers but does not provide a supply chain solution well suited for the unique needs of healthcare providers, and therefore has a very small market share.

McKesson, once a strong player in this space, has faded over the years in ERP as they have with EHR solutions. The majority of the McKesson ERP customer base, using the products commonly referred to as Pathways, have been long-time legacy customers. Pathways has not been kept up with modern ERP needs, and it has been many years since I have seen a hospital consider Pathways as a potential solution, but rather it is typically the solution being replaced.

Infor has invested significantly in creating a cloud-based solution, referred to as CloudSuite. However, the existing healthcare customer base typically has an on-premise installation and therefore cloud adoption has been focused on new customers as well as those that are specifically looking to transition away from on-premise. McKesson has not had a cloud offering, therefore it would make sense for them to partner with someone to offer it as an alternative to Pathways.

Infor will gain access to the Mckesson customer base, many of whom are likely considering leaving Pathways for other solutions anyway. In addition, Infor will be able to provide Mckesson’s Strategic Sourcing solution for their customers.

However, it is unclear what that means for Pathways. While McKesson press releases state that CloudSuite is an alternative to Pathways, one has to wonder why Infor would want to expose their solution to someone who is actively selling a competitive solution, and why McKesson would continue to invest in Pathways when it has access to a much more mature and robust solution as a go-forward path for its Pathways customers.

Therefore while it is likely that McKesson will keep Pathways supported and up-to-date with regulatory improvements for the time being, it seems very unlikely that they would continue to enhance it – and inevitable that it will eventually be sunset in favor of transitioning those customers to Infor Cloudsuite. If history is indeed an appropriate predictor of the future, consider that McKesson announced its BetterHealth 2020 plan – in which they announced a focus on Paragon as their EHR but continued support of the older Horizon EHR product. Shortly after that they went back on that commitment and announced they would sunset Horizon in 2018.

Meaningful Use has led to a focus of resources on Electronic Health Records implementations which have led many customers to hold onto their older ERP solutions past their useful life. I suspect that the next two years will see a re-focus to ERP solutions with customers with more modern solutions focusing on upgrades and new feature deployment while customers with older solutions making a change.

Those customers who stayed on Horizon for too long are currently in a rush to implement replacements before the March 2018 sunset date.Customers on Pathways products should likely start the conversation now about their long-term ERP plans and consider if they want to get ahead of any sunset announcement.

If you’d like to receive future posts by Brian in your inbox, you can subscribe to future Healthcare Optimization Scene posts here. Be sure to also read the archive of previous Healthcare Optimization Scene posts.

Indecision in Upgrading Infrastructure – Blamed on Meaningful Use

Posted on January 6, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In a conversation I had with Steve Prather, CEO at Dizzion, he made a really interesting observation about meaningful use causing delays in upgrading infrastructure at many healthcare organizations. It’s not hard to see how spending millions, hundreds of millions or even billions of dollars on EHR and related services in order to meet the meaningful use requirements could cause budget cuts in other areas like upgrading infrastructure.

Of course, the opposite can be true as well. I know when we first implemented an EHR, a good portion of the EHR budget was to upgrade some of the infrastructure needed to support the new software. I’m sure that probably means that some infrastructure benefited from the EHR upgrade and meaningful use, but I’m sure some infrastructure spending also got cut or delayed.

In my conversation with Steve he went on to observe that much of the hardware in healthcare organizations had gotten so old, indecision and delays were no longer a choice. Having talked to many CIOs, they feel this in their organizations. While many CIOs want to move on to more strategic efforts, there’s still a big part of any CIOs job that requires them to maintain and upgrade their IT infrastructure. Although, it seems that many of them are looking to push this responsibility off to a kind of IT COO position.

I’ll be interested to watch and see how these organizations approach their infrastructure upgrades. Will most continue to do all the work in house or will they start to outsource this essentially commodity task to an outside company? There’s a really interesting case for why organizations should outsource this work as opposed to continuing to do it in house. All of this points back to the CIO becoming a vendor management organization.

Has your infrastructure upgrades been delayed by meaningful use? Is your organization looking to finally upgrade or is MACRA going to delay things further?

Top Hospital EMR and EHR Blog Posts for 2016

Posted on December 30, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It’s that time of year when you look back at the past year and think about what you’ve accomplished. At Hospital EMR and EHR, we like to look back at the stats for the top blog posts we’ve published. It’s always interesting to see what’s resonated with people. Plus, it’s interesting to see how things have changed since we’ve posted on a topic. So, without further ado, here’s a look at the top blog posts in 2016 for Hospital EMR and EHR along with some commentary on each.

1. Why Is It So Hard to Become a Certified Epic consultant? – This is by far the top post generating 4-10 times as much traffic as the posts below.  It’s also why I’ve wanted to make the time to do a whole series of blog posts on Epic Certification and along with it Cerner Certification, MEDITECH Certification, etc.  When you make something like Epic Certification hard to get, people want it even more.  It’s just too bad they’re so closed since it drives up the prices for Epic consultants and thus the cost to implement Epic.  Certainly, we’ll be writing about this more in the future.

2. NYC Hospitals Face Massive Problems With Epic Install – This was a big story back in 2013 and still is today.  We should probably look at doing a follow up story to see what’s happening at NYC hospitals a few years after this story hit.

3. Epic Install Triggers Loss At MD Anderson – No surprise, people love to read about challenges in EHR implementations.  We saw quite a few of these from Epic in 2016 and people were interested in what went wrong.  The problem from the outside is it’s really hard to know who is to blame for the failure.  What has become clear over this year is that many healthcare organizations are blaming Epic for their revenue issues.

4. Hospital EMR and EHR Vendors – This page needs some work, but no doubt many people want to know who the big players in the hospital EMR and EHR market are.  This is true if they’re selecting a new EHR, switching EHR or looking to partner with EHR companies.

5. Why Do People Dislike Epic So Much? Let Me Count The Ways – This post is 5.5 years old and still going strong.  I imagine many people are still counting the ways they hate Epic.  I think I read that Epic finally hired a PR person.  Maybe that new hire can work on this.

6. A Study on the Impact of ICD-10 on Coding and Revenue Cycle – This was a good study that illustrated the impact of ICD-10.  It also gave some good words of caution about the impact of ICD-10 going forward.

7. Epic EMR Costs Drag Down Finances At Brigham and Women’s – Another example of the cost to implement Epic.  I knew this was a hot topic this year and the stats show that people were interested in the details.

8. The Argument for Meditech – I can’t believe this post is 5 years old already, but it still rings true today.  MEDITECH is not without its challenges, but it also doesn’t get the credit it deserves either.  I had a chance to visit their offices near Boston this year.  I’ll be really interested to see where MEDITECH takes their product next.  Many people have counted them out, but I certainly haven’t.

9. Can HIM Professionals Become Clinical Documentation Improvement Specialists? – We’ve published a lot about the changing world of HIM thanks to our new series of HIM Scene blog posts.  This post was a great example of how there are a lot of new opportunities for HIM professionals that are willing to embrace change and adapt as needed.

10. Great Healthcare IT Leaders – This is a great list of healthcare IT leaders as shared by David Chou.  David made the case for meeting up with them at HIMSS 2016, but the nice part is thanks to social media you can follow most of them year round.

An honorable mention to the 11th post on the list which talks about Dr. Rasu Shrestha helping an injured passenger on his way to HIMSS 2016.  Love stories like this.  Did you have a favorite post on Hospital EMR and EHR?  Was there an idea or concept you read on Hospital EMR and EHR?  We’d love to hear about it in the comments.

What’s the Role of a Hospital CIO in Business Model Transformation?

Posted on December 23, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I don’t think anyone would argue that the healthcare business model is changing. There are a number of dynamics at play that are requiring every healthcare organization to evaluate what their business will look like in the future. Some examples of these changes include:

  • Patients with High Deductible Plans
  • Accountable Care Organizations
  • Other Risk Based Care Models
  • Value Based Reimbursement
  • Telemedicine
  • Chatbots and AI Assistants
  • Health Sensors
  • Retail Clinics

I could go on and on, but I think that highlights some of the major ones. What’s interesting about these trends is that it requires a change in business model. However, pretty much every one of these changes in business models requires the use of technology to facilitate the change. Some of them are impossible to do without technology.

If technology is going to play an important role in healthcare’s business transformation, what role should the hospital CIO play in the organization?

What’s shocking to me is how many CIOs don’t want any part in the business transformation part of healthcare. At CHIME I heard one CIO say, “We don’t want anything to do with MACRA. We just want to supply them the systems and let them figure it out.” I’m not sure the “them” he was referring to, but I think this approach is a big mistake. We’re all in this together and have to act as a team to get it done in the most efficient and effective way possible.

I was impressed by another hospital CIO who said basically the opposite. She said, “Oh no, we’re going to be in charge of MACRA and MIPS. I don’t want them taking over MACRA and MIPS, because if they’re in charge of it they’ll select a bunch of items for which we’re not capable of doing.”

Once again, this points to the need for collaboration to occur. You need the clinical insight together with the technical and software based insight in order to make the best decisions possible.

More importantly is I think it’s a big mistake for the hospital CIO to not be part of the business transformation. If the hospital CIO doesn’t take part in business transformation, then IT essentially becomes a commodity. The worst thing you can be in an organization is a commodity. When you’re a commodity they squeeze the budget out of you and you’re seen as non-essential or non-critical to an organization. What CIO wants to be in that type of organization?

I do see most progressive healthcare IT leaders outsourcing much of the “commodity IT” to other third party providers so they can focus their efforts on becoming a more essential part of their organization’s business transformation. The problem is that this requires a different set of skills and interests than what was essentially an operational role managing servers, desktop, and the network.

What type of CIO are you? What type of CIO does your organization need or want?

ReadsforRads is Working to Democratize Radiology

Posted on December 14, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

At the RSNA 2016 conference, Healthcare Scene learned about a new platform for radiologists that’s looking to democratize radiology. This new platform is called ReadsforRads. In our conversation with Dr. Phillip A. Templeton, Chief Medical Officer at ReadsforRads, we learned more about ReadsforRads and their mission to democratize radiology. I love the approach they’re taking to make radiology better for both radiology departments and imaging centers. Plus, doing so will ultimate benefit the patients the most.

To learn more about ReadsforRads and the way they benefit the health system, radiologists, and patients, check out our video interview with Dr. Templeton below:

No doubt ReadsforRads has some challenges as they work to scale their platform, but I was impressed by the progress they’ve already made. Their efforts on managing radiologists credentialing was quite interesting. I mentioned the ReadsforRads platform to my radiologist neighbor and his wife instantly said “Yes! Moonlight so we can buy a house.”

While the opportunity for a radiologist to make some extra cash moonlighting is interesting, I was extremely excited about ReadsforRads ability to get the right radiologist reading the radiology image. There are a lot of situations where the radiology image needs to be read by a true expert and that person might be on vacation or small institutions might not be able to afford that type of radiologist expertise in house. ReadsforRads can cover these gaps and make sure the read is done by the most qualified person. That can really benefit all of healthcare.

Healthcare Security is Scaring Hospital CIOs

Posted on November 16, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is sponsored by Samsung Business. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

Coming out of the CHIME CIO Forum, I had a chance to mix and mingle with hundreds of hospital CIOs. There was one major theme at the conference: security. If you asked these hospital CIOs what was keeping them up at night, I’m sure that almost every one of them would say security. They see it as a major challenge and the job is never done.

I had more than one CIO tell me that breaches of their healthcare system are going to happen. That’s why it’s extremely important to have a 2 prong security strategy in healthcare that includes both creating security barriers and also a mitigation and response strategy.

One of the most challenging pieces of security identified by these healthcare CIOs was the proliferation of endpoints. That includes the proliferation of devices including mobile devices and the increase in the number of users using these technologies. There was far less concern about the mobile devices since there are some really deeply embedded software and hardware security built into mobile devices like Samsung’s Knox which has made mobile device security a lot easier to implement. The same can’t be said for the number of people using these devices. One hospital CIO described it as 21,000 points of vulnerability when he talked about the 21,000 people who worked at his organization. Sadly, there’s no one software solution to prevent human error.

This is why we see so much investment in security awareness programs and breach detection. Your own staff are often your biggest vulnerability. Training them is a good start and can prevent some disasters, but the malware has gotten so sophisticated that it’s really impossible to completely stop. That’s why you need great software that can detect when a breach has occurred so you can deal with it quickly.

On the one hand, it’s one of the most exciting times to be in healthcare IT. We have so much more data available to us that we can use to improve care. However, with all that data and technology comes an increased need to make sure that data and technology is kept secure. The good news is that many hospital boards have woken up to this fact and are finally funding security efforts as a priority for their organization. Is your organization prepared?

For more content like this, follow Samsung on Insights, Twitter, LinkedIn , YouTube and SlideShare.

Hospital CIOs Say Better Data Security Is Key Goal

Posted on November 9, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

A new study has concluded that while they obviously have other goals, an overwhelming majority of healthcare CIOs see data protection as their key objective for the near future. The study, which was sponsored by Spok and administered by CHIME, more than 100 IT leaders were polled on their perspective on communications and healthcare.

In addition to underscoring the importance of data security efforts, the study also highlighted the extent to which CIOs are being asked to add new functions and wear new hats (notably patient satisfaction management).

Goals and investments
When asked what business goals they expected to be focused on for the next 18 months, the top goal of 12 possible options was “strengthening data security,” which was chosen by 81%. “Increasing patient satisfaction” followed relatively closely at 70%, and “improving physician satisfaction” was selected by 65% of respondents.

When asked which factors were most important in making investments in communications-related technologies for their hospital, the top factor of 11 possible options was “best meets clinician/organizational needs” with 82% selecting that choice, followed by “ease of use for end users (e.g. physician/nurse) at 80% and “ability to integrate with current systems (e.g. EHR) at 75%.

When it came to worfklows they hoped to support with better tools, “care coordination for treatment planning” was the clear leader, chosen by 67% of respondents, followed by patient discharge (48%), “patient handoffs within hospital” (46%) and “patient handoffs between health services and facilities” chosen by 40% of respondents selected.

Mobile developments
Turning to mobile, Spok asked healthcare CIOs which of nine technology use cases were driving the selection and deployment of mobile apps. The top choices, by far, were “secure messaging in communications among care team” at 84% and “EHR access/integrations” with 83%.

A significant number of respondents (68%) said they were currently in the process of rolling out a secure texting solution. Respondents said their biggest challenges in doing so were “physician adoption/stakeholder buy-in” at 60% and “technical setup and provisioning” at 40%. A substantial majority (78%) said they’d judge the success of their rollout by the rate the solution was adopted by by physicians.

Finally, when Spok asked the CIOs to take a look at the future and predict which issues will be most important to them three years from now, the top-rated choice was “patient centered care,” which was chosen by 29% of respondents,” “EHR integrations” and “business intelligence.”

A couple of surprises
While much of this is predictable, I was surprised by a couple things.

First, the study doesn’t seem to have been designed for statistical significance, it’s still worth noting that so many CIOs said improving patient satisfaction was one of their top three goals for the next 18 months. I’m not sure what they can do to achieve this end, but clearly they’re trying. (Exactly what steps they should take is a subject for another article.)

Also, I didn’t expect to see so many CIOs engaged in rolling out secure texting, partly because I would’ve expected such rollouts to already have been in place at this point, and partly because I assume that more CIOs would be more focused on higher-level mobile apps (such as EHR interfaces). I guess that while mobile clinical integration efforts are maturing, many healthcare facilities aren’t ready to take them on yet.

Are CIOs Now Vendor Management Organizations?

Posted on October 21, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Over my past 11 years blogging on healthcare IT, I’ve seen a dramatic shift in the role a CIO plays in healthcare organizations. This was highlighted really well to me in a recent interview I did with Steve Prather, CEO of Dizzion. He commented that hospital CIOs are now mostly vendor management organizations.

I thought this was the perfect way to describe the shift. One challenge with this shift is that many hospital CEOs haven’t realized that this is what’s happening. In many hospital executives minds, the CIO is still generating code, implementing servers, network switches, rolling out desktops, and cabling. In most cases, this couldn’t be further from the truth. Yes, the CIO still has to make sure there’s a high quality network, servers, and desktops, but that does little to describe the work a CIO actually does.

Instead of getting into the nitty gritty, most CIOs have become professional vendor managers. This has become the reality as most of what people think of IT (servers, desktop, networks, email, etc) have become commodity services. There’s very little strategic advantage to do these things in-house. They’ve become such commodity services that it costs much less to outsource many of these services to an outside vendor.

What does this mean for the CIO? Instead of being Microsoft or Cisco certified, they need to be well versed in relationship management. That’s a big shift in philosophy and a very different skill set. In fact, most people who have those type of tech skills and certification are people that can struggle with relationships. There are exceptions, but that’s generally the case. CIOs that can’t handle relationships are going to suffer going forward.

Lest we think that this is a change that’s specific to healthcare, it’s not. This shifting CIO role is happening across every industry. In fact, it highlights why it’s not a bad idea to consider CIOs from outside of healthcare. If you can’t find a CIO who has healthcare experience, you could still find a great CIO from outside healthcare as long as they have the right relationship management skills.

E-Patient Update: Hospitals Should Share Ransomware Updates

Posted on October 14, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

A few weeks ago, a California hospital quietly fended off a ransomware attack without paying a ransom to the attackers. According to Health Leaders Media, Keck Medical Center of USC was hit with a ransomware assault on servers at two hospitals, but managed to fix the problem and retrieve its data.

Employees at Keck Hospital of USC and Norris Comprehensive Cancer Care found ransomware on two servers on August 1, said Keck Hospitals CEO Rod Hanners in a statement on the matter. The attack encrypted files on the servers, which made their data unavailable to hospital employees. However, Hanners reported, the hospitals had no evidence of a breach of patient information.

Still, given that some sensitive information was contained in folders encrypted by the malware, USC notified patients about the breach, Health Leaders reports. Data that could (at least theoretically) have been accessed by the attackers included names and dates of birth, health information such as treatment and diagnosis information and some Social Security numbers.

If what I’ve read is accurate, the crew at Keck did a great job. They got things under control very quickly, and chose to do the right thing in notifying patients about the breach. (And in all truth, the attack might not have been much of a big deal — perhaps one launched by a script kiddie using Ransomware as a Service tools — which could explain why the hospitals seem to be relatively unruffled.) Still, my feeling is that they could have communicated more.

A patient’s perspective

As I ponder the events above, I do wonder whether the professionals managing this particular ransomware attack understand what it’s like to be on the receiving end of a ransomware episode. So here’s a few things to consider from a patient’s perspective:

  • Ransomware is scary: While I’m healthcare technology writer and somewhat familiar with ransomware attacks, they are still new to most of the public. They may turn out to be just another infection vector for your network, but they come across as a dark force to consumers. Be prepared to educate and calm us.
  • People don’t know what to expect: I was due to have a cardiac procedure done by a doctor affiliated with Washington, D.C.-based MedStar Health a couple of weeks after it suffered a ransomware attack. While the news media made it clear that the hospital chain was paralyzed for a time, nobody bothered to tell me what the impact of this paralysis would be. It would have been better if MedStar facilities and doctors reached out to patients in immediate and near-term need of care to clarify.
  • We need progress reports: Clearly, the Keck attack didn’t amount to much, but other ransomware attacks, such as the MedStar incident, can’t be resolved overnight. As patients, we need to know roughly how long our providers may be at less than full capacity. Keep us updated or you’ll lose our trust.

With any luck, healthcare organizations will continue to improve their ability to fight back ransomware attacks, and in time, be prepared to treat them as little more than road bumps in their security efforts. But until then, it makes sense to pull out all the stops and keep patients extra well-informed.

Getting the Team in an EHR State of Mind

Posted on September 23, 2016 I Written By

For the past twenty years, I have been working with healthcare organizations to implement technologies and improve business processes. During that time, I have had the opportunity to lead major transformation initiatives including implementation of EHR and ERP systems as well as design and build of shared service centers. I have worked with many of the largest healthcare providers in the United States as well as many academic and children's hospitals. In this blog, I will be discussing my experiences and ideas and encourage everyone to share your own as well in the comments.

Recently I had the opportunity to do something different, fun, and unexpected – I opened a team meeting with a music video.

I am currently leading an EHR implementation. Each month, I hold a meeting of the nearly 80 hospital staff members who are part of the project. The meetings combine sharing information about the project with each other, team building activities, and teaching them about change management, process improvement, and team dynamics techniques. I am always looking for a way to make each meeting interesting and memorable.

This month I wanted to initiate a good dialog in the meeting about a topic I wanted to address head-on: Why do Physicians Hate EHRs? And what are we, as a team, going to do about it to make our physicians love their EHR?

It reminded me of a great video crated by a physician right here in Las Vegas, ZDoggMD, whose videos I found through Healthcarescene.com. Viewing it again, it was indeed the perfect way to set the stage for this discussion. Fun, entertaining and such an accurate representation of how physicians feel about these applications.

The video itself got the team excited, motivated, and laughing – and led to one of the most engaging, productive, and thought-provoking conversations we have had on the project.

For the project leaders out there – I would recommend trying this type of technique with your teams.

For any physician or anyone else who has used an EHR and has not seen this music video, enjoy and share if it represents your point of view about EHR applications:

If you’d like to receive future posts by Brian in your inbox, you can subscribe to future Healthcare Optimization Scene posts here. Be sure to also read the archive of previous Healthcare Optimization Scene posts.