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Health IT Marketing and PR Conference – Hospital Marketing

Posted on December 2, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’m excited to let you know about the 2nd Annual Health IT Marketing and PR Conference (HITMC) happening in Las Vegas on may 7-8, 2-15. This is an event we organizer to bring together the very best marketing and PR professionals in healthcare. Here’s a video from the inaugural event which gives you a feel for what you’ll find at this year’s event:

While a huge portion of the conference will still be focused on Healthcare B2B marketing, at HITMC 2015 we’re adding a number of sessions that will focus on marketing to patients as well. No doubt this will include lots of discussion on how hospitals can market their services to patients. Plus, many of the sessions apply to marketers of every kind: social media marketing, SEO (search engine optimization), content marketing, thought leadership, event marketing, etc.

We’re also creating a unique HITMC connect experience for attendees to connect with some of the smartest minds in healthcare marketing and PR. Plus, we’re working on creating a whole space dedicated to the tools every marketer needs to be able to do their jobs. Imagine a sandbox where you can literally get your hands dirty with the latest and greatest healthcare marketing tools.

As with most conferences, some of the greatest value of attending the event is the interactions you’ll have with other healthcare marketers. The event really does bring together the best and brightest in healthcare marketing. Everywhere you turn you’ll meet someone who’s dealing with some of the same challenges you’re facing in your job.

Early bird registration for the event is now open. If you register now, you’ll save $500 off the cost of the event. I hope to see many of you in Las Vegas.

When Would It Make Sense to Share Your Healthcare Data Findings?

Posted on November 21, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

During a recent visit with Stoltenberg Consulting, we had a really interesting discussion about the future of innovation in healthcare. I think we all saw the potential that healthcare data findings can do to improve healthcare. I believe we’re sitting on top of amazing untapped potential in healthcare data that’s going to start being mined over the next few years.

With this in mind, I asked the questions, “Will hospitals and health systems share their data findings? How will we share the data findings?

I think these are extremely important questions as we enter the new world of healthcare discovery and I don’t think the old methods of published journal articles is going to get us to where we want to go. Think about how hard it is to go through the process of getting a journal article published and then the time it takes for the journal article to diffuse through the healthcare system.

Many people fear that health systems won’t want to share their healthcare data findings thanks to competitive concerns. While this may be true in some specific cases, I’ve found the opposite to be the case in healthcare organizations. When they find something that benefits their patients or health system, they are happy to share it with everyone. I think it’s something about the nature of healthcare that makes us want to improve the lives of everyone versus bowing to competitive pressures.

While I think that many want to share their healthcare data findings, the reality is that most of the healthcare data findings aren’t shared. I think that many health systems discover something in their data, but they don’t have an easy way to share it with the broader healthcare community. The choice isn’t to deliberately not share the findings, but they don’t have the time to share it.

We need to find a way to solve this problem. I think social media will play one small part in this type of sharing, but it’s only one element. We need a platform in healthcare that simplifies the sharing of healthcare data discoveries. If it’s not dead simple for a healthcare professional to share their discoveries, it doesn’t make sense for them to do it.

Given the lack of a healthcare discovery platform, this presents a great opportunity for companies like the aforementioned Stoltenberg Consulting to package up these discoveries in easier to consume packages. I’m not sure that this is a terrible model either.

In a simplistic view, one hospital could share their health data discoveries online and another hospital could replicate it. However, the process is rarely that simple and often requires a bit more work to make the results a reality. This is where it makes sense for an outside company to bring the full package of services and software to make the discovery a simple reality for a hospital. The hospitals I know often want to buy the full stack solution. They don’t have the bandwidth to recreate the solution themselves.

Regardless of how it happens, I hope we can find better ways to diffuse healthcare innovations and discoveries across all of healthcare.

The Connection of Sports and Healthcare

Posted on June 26, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It seems like the soccer tide has hit the US as more and more as ESPN finally decided to broadcast the entire World Cup. The viewer numbers have been great. I expect many in healthcare will be tied to their computers or a TV in their hospital watching the US play Germany today. While not totally universal, it’s amazing the way sports can bring people together.

I was reminded of this when I saw this tweet from Mass General Hospital in Boston:

I’m a Dolphins fan, but understand why many would love to see Gronk and other Patriot players at their hospital. Pretty cool. Plus, so many hospitals are non-profits, so I guess this is considered charity work for the players. No doubt sports can be a great way for a team to bond together.

Of course, what does this have to do with healthcare IT? Nothing really. Unless you’re the IT director at a hospital that’s watching your bandwidth consumption during the 2 hours of the World Cup go through the roof. That would be interesting to see.

I guess it’s fair to say I have a bit of World Cup fever as well.

What Can a Hospital Learn from Snapchat?

Posted on May 2, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

For those of you who don’t follow the trends, Facebook started the social network fun. Although, more and more youngsters are moving from Facebook to Instagram. Now, we’re seeing more and more people using Instagram and Snapchat. I’m sure some of you reading this are saying, “What’s Snapchat?”

Here’s a good description of Snapchat for that aren’t familiar with it:

Using the application, users can take photos, record videos, add text and drawings, and send them to a controlled list of recipients. These sent photographs and videos are known as “Snaps”. Users set a time limit for how long recipients can view their Snaps (as of April 2014, the range is from 1 to 10 seconds),[6] after which they will be hidden from the recipient’s device and deleted from Snapchat’s servers.

In the Facebook world, Zuckerberg told us all that we should all use our full name and that we should share everything with the world and keep it as a kind of history of our life forever. That’s been a really popular model and has a lot of benefits. However, the popularity of Snapchat shows that there’s also a lot of value in something that has much more restrictive and temporary life.

To describe it more simply, people are getting more interested and sophisticated in their approach to privacy.

Today, I think it’s fair to say that we have the Facebook model for data. Any data we collect we need to keep and preserve forever. The idea of ever deleting data is a sin of the highest degree. There are a lot of reasons why this model is used in healthcare. However, I wonder if a hospital could benefit from a snapchat like platform that allows you to communicate across the organization without the eternal nature of that conversation being stored in the patient record forever.

I’m sure the privacy advocates will come out and say that it’s a terrible idea. Why would healthcare providers want to communicate something that doesn’t get documented in the chart. Plus, heaven forbid something be said that the patient doesn’t get to access and see. All of these concerns are overblown. I know they are, because these private conversations have been happening since the beginning of medicine. They just happen in the hallways or on a phone call instead of an online message.

Much like consumers, we need to get a lot more sophisticated in our approach to how we handle our communication and the privacy of that communication.

HIMSS CIO Forum

Posted on February 11, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

If you’re in the hospital space and you don’t know about the 2014 CIO Forum at HIMSS, then you’re really missing out. The event is put together by CHIME and HIMSS and it is one of the largest group of hospital CIO’s that you will find anywhere. The only place that might have more hospital CIOs is the CHIME Fall Forum. Imagine a ballroom full of the top hospital healthcare IT leaders and that’s the CIO Forum at HIMSS.

Sadly I won’t be arriving until late on Saturday and so I’ll miss the opening reception, but I’m definitely planning to stop by the Sunday sessions after I take care of my church duties (which during HIMSS is ironically a fun place to meet HIMSS attendees). Sunday they have a list of speakers, but the biggest value is being able to connect and learn from the hospital CIOs.

As I posted about today on EMR and EHR, I love the social media at HIMSS, but I also love the experience at the CIO Forum.

Wow..this sounds like a big sales pitch. Well, I have no reason to pitch it. I just thought some readers might not know about it and be interested. Plus, if any of you are attending as well, I’d love to meet you. It’s certainly become an important part of my time at HIMSS.

Let me know what other parts of HIMSS you’re looking forward to attending. I’ve mostly put off my schedule for now, but in the next couple days I’m going to start scheduling it all out. Any feedback or suggestions are certainly welcome.

Kaiser Sales and IT Implementation Process

Posted on January 14, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I was really impressed by this blog post by Danielle Cass, Innovation Evangelist in Kaiser Permanente’s Innovation & Advanced Technology Group (sounds like a fun, but tough job) on the HBR blogs. If you’re trying to sell something to hospitals, then you should really take the time to read the whole blog post.

Danielle opens with the crux of the challenge that any healthcare innovation meets when they try to get a hospital to adopt their technology.

No matter how many creative solutions we drum up to improve quality of care and service in the U.S. health system, they won’t do much good if only a few clinicians and institutions know about them and apply them.

But how do you overcome obstacles to spreading innovation, like fear of change, resource constraints, and slow, consensus-based decision making? By connecting people so they can quickly and easily share insights, collaborate on prototypes, and draft off one another’s enthusiasm and momentum. As Atul Gawande put it in a recent New Yorker article, “Human interaction is the key force in overcoming resistance and speeding change.”

In the rest of the post, Dannielle goes through the process of how a new innovative technology was introduced at Kaiser. It provides as clear a look as I’ve ever seen into the challenge of selling into hospitals and getting the technology implemented. It’s a slow process with a lot of challenges.

No doubt Kaiser is a unique institution, but from my experience many hospital systems experience some of the very same problems. It’s very easy to talk about innovation, but it’s a harder thing to get that innovation to diffuse through the organization.

Maybe this is just top of mind as I plan the first ever Healthcare IT Marketing and PR Conference, but it really illustrates the challenge that health IT companies face selling their product into hospitals. It’s a major process to find the right people and get the right people on board with the vision of your product.

Hospital CIO Challenges at CHIME13

Posted on October 11, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

For those who haven’t discovered my new EHR video website, you should go check it out now and sign up for it’s email list. I’ll be doing regular interviews with some of the top healthcare IT leaders in the country. I think many of you will enjoy it.

This week however, I knew I’d be at the CHIME Fall CIO Forum and so I decided to twist things up a little and have our very own Anne Zieger interview me about what I’d seen and heard at CHIME. We talk a lot about the challenges hospital CIOs face when it comes to meaningful use, ICD-10, HIEs and changing reimbursement. I think you’ll enjoy the insights that are shared. Enjoy the video embedded below (please excuse the poor lighting, but maybe that’s better since it’s me on camera).

Also, let us know if there are other people you’d like to see us interview. We’re always interested in hearing our readers/viewers thoughts on where we should take it.

Facebook Like Now Covered by the First Amendment – Applications for Healthcare

Posted on September 23, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

A big court case, Bland v. Roberts, has recently ruled that the Facebook Like is now covered by the first amendment. This was an overturn of a previous lower court ruling. Here’s the summary of the case from The Atlantic:

In November of 2009, B.J. Roberts, the sheriff of Hampton, Virginia, ran for re-election. A group of workers in Roberts’ office, however, among them one Bobby Bland, weren’t enthused about the prospects of their boss’s continuation in his role. So they took to their Facebook accounts to protest the run: They Liked the campaign of Roberts’s opponent, Jim Adams. Despite the minuscule mutiny, however, Roberts won the election. He then chose not to retain Bland and the others as his employees. The dismissals, Roberts said at the time, were the result not only of budgeting concerns, but also of the workers’ hindrance of “the harmony and efficiency of the office.” The sheriff had not liked his workers’ Likes.

Bland and his colleagues took Roberts to court, arguing that, in the dismissals, Roberts had violated their First Amendment rights. In April of 2012, however, the U.S. District Court of Eastern Virginia dismissed the case on the grounds that a Like didn’t involve an “actual statement,” and therefore was “insufficient speech to merit constitutional protection.”

Yesterday, however, that decision was overturned. A federal appeals court ruled that a Facebook Like is, indeed, a form of expression that is covered by the First Amendment. Clicking a button is, per the decision, a protected form of speech.

Of course, those reading this must be wondering how this applies to healthcare.

Some of you might remember last month when several Spectrum Health employees were terminated over a picture posted to Facebook. The employee who posted the picture was fired and so was everyone who liked it.

I’m not saying that these cases are the same. Posting a picture that could be considered a violation of HIPAA and could be a violation of an organizations social media policy is different than a police officer liking an opposing Sheriff’s page. However, I wouldn’t want to be Spectrum Health if the employees who liked the Facebook photo brought a wrongful termination lawsuit. There are a lot of intricacies to a case that covers so many areas of the law.

In another international example, 15 nurses were fired from a hospital for liking someone’s comment which was critical of the hospital. Certainly the Philippines has different laws than we have in the US. However, I wouldn’t be surprised to see a similar thing happen in the US. Considering the latest ruling, I’d be really careful if I were a hospital firing someone based on social media.

My favorite thing is when healthcare organizations try and control and restrict social media. As many institutions have learned, that’s impossible to do. Instead, it’s much more effective to educate and inform people on their use of social media. The best reason you should educate and inform as opposed to control and restrict is the message it sends to your employees. The former sends a message of trust and respect while the later does the opposite.