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Nominate Someone to the #HIT100

Posted on July 4, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As has become a July 4th tradition, the healthcare IT social media community comes together to recognize the incredible people on healthcare social media that influence their lives. It’s called the #HIT100 and happens on Twitter with people nominating the people that influence them for good. It’s really simple to participate and a great way to show some gratitude and love for someone you appreciate. Here are the details from the official announcement:

Required hashtags:

(Each nomination should have all of these)

  • #HIT100 or #HIT99 (One or the other is required)
  • #HealthIT (Optional)
  • #HITsm (Optional)

Optional hashtags:

(Please use only one of them so that the analytics have value)

  • #FHIR (Optional)
  • #Interoperability (Optional)
  • #PersonalizedMedicine or #PrecisionMedicine (Optional)
  • #Genomics

Some rules will change this year due to the analytical tools being put in place for the first time:

NOMINATION RULES:

  1. Nominations start
    Friday July 1st 2016 at 6PM and end on Friday July 8th at 6PM
  2. Only one person at a time may be nominated.  Multi-nominations in one tweet will not be counted though they might form part of the analytical information base
  3. Only direct nominations will be counted.  Retweets will not be counted though they may be analyzed for further enjoyment
  4. Favorites will not be counted though they may be analyzed for further entertainment
  5. There will only be one cycle of nominations.  No delegates or super-delegates here
  6. I reserve the judgement to disqualify a nomination that I find suspicious for any reason
  7. You are encouraged to include one of the optional hashtags above so that we can process with analytics to get some statistics about each one of them
  8. You can add a sentiment to the end of the nomination
  9. You must have fun and please follow each other as you discover new members of our community

If that’s too confusing, here are a couple examples. You can copy and then edit as appropriate.

I nominate @ehrandhit to the #HIT100 list – #HealthIT #HITsm #FHIR – Because they curate amazing content!

I nominate @techguy to the #HIT100 list – #HealthIT #HITsm He offers great insights into #PrecisionMedicine

Join in the fun and recognize your favorite people on social media! Happy 4th of July!

HIMSS Social Media Ambassador Debate: FHIR and Patient Focus

Posted on June 8, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

While at HIMSS, I had a chance to do a “debate” with my good friend, partner and fellow HIMSS Social Media Ambassador, Shahid Shah. This was facilitated by Healthcare IT News, and the debate was moderated by Beth Jones Sanborn, Managing Editor of Healthcare Finance. Shahid and I had a good debate on the topics of healthcare interoperability and FHIR. Plus, we talked about the need for healthcare IT companies to focus on the patient and whether they deserve the bad rap they get or not. Enjoy the video debate below:
Read more..

Health IT Software Must Be Meaningful and Pleasurable

Posted on April 27, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of the most dynamic healthcare CIO’s is Shafiq Rab, MD, MPH, Vice President and CIO at Hackensack UMC. Healthcare Scene was lucky enough to talk with him at the DataMotion Health booth during HIMSS 2016. Dr. Rab talked with us about Hackensack UMC’s approach to healthcare IT innovation. He offered some great insights into how to approach any healthcare IT project, about Hackensack University Medical Center’s “selfie” app, and their efforts to use Direct and FHIR to empower the patient.

I love that Dr. Rab leads off the discussion with the idea that healthcare IT software that they implement must be meaningful and pleasurable. Far too many health IT software miss these important goals. They aren’t very meaningful and they’re definitely not pleasurable.

Dr. Rab’s focus on the patient is also worth highlighting. Health IT would be in a much better place if there was a great focus on the patient along with making health IT software meaningful and pleasurable. Thanks Dr. Rab and DataMotion Health for doing this interview with us.

The Misconceptions of Social Media in Healthcare

Posted on April 18, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today I came across this blog post on the Cisco blog about an employee’s entry into the world of Twitter and social media. She offers a number of great points that are worthy of highlighting:

  • It’s Not Stupid
  • You Don’t Have to Be All-In
  • Twitter is a Great Equalizer
  • You Be You

This is all some great advice. Except I would argue that some parts of Twitter are stupid. However, that’s true of most things of value. There’s a lot of email in this world that is terribly stupid. That doesn’t diminish the value of email.

Although, as I read through the list, I recognized the real problem with social media is that people have the wrong perception of what social media is and how it can benefit them. Sure, social media can be a marketing tool for your company. Social media can be a way for you to broadcast what you eat and when you sleep and when you see a beautiful pink flower. It literally can be anything you want it to be. However, if you don’t want it to be those things, then it won’t be those things.

Twitter is literally what you make of it. If you want it to be about food, then you can follow the kind of people that post about food. If you want to enjoy pictures of flowers, then you can find someone who posts pictures of flowers. However, if those topics don’t interest you, then don’t follow those types of accounts. On just my @techguy account I’m somewhere around 22,696 tweets in and I can only remember 3-4 pictures that included food ever. There might be a flower picture in there somewhere, but it’s likely in the background.

Of course, if you don’t care about healthcare IT, then you probably don’t want to follow me either. I’ve sent a lot of tweets about healthcare IT and had a lot of conversations with people about EHR. The point is that if there’s a topic you enjoy or a topic that’s needed for your work, you’ll find it on social media and on Twitter. Sure, there’s plenty of other junk, but you really won’t see it if you’re following the right people. Plus, if you get the random food picture, I can promise you that it won’t hurt you. In fact, some randomness is part of the fun of Twitter.

So far I’ve really only talked about social media consumption. That’s the beauty of social media as well. There’s no requirement that you ever actually broadcast anything yourself. More and more people are just using social media for content curation and education. They never send a tweet. They don’t know what a retweet or favorite is. They don’t DM. They don’t use hashtags. They just consume the social media others create.

While I think there’s some missed value if all you’re doing is consuming content and not interacting on social media, that doesn’t mean there’s not a lot of value available on social media even if all you’re doing is consuming. It can be incredibly valuable. You can learn a lot to help your career. You can learn a lot about people. You can learn a lot about a company or your competitor. There’s so much value that can be obtained through simply consuming information shared on social media.

With that said, the blogger linked at the top of this post is right. Social media is the great equalizer. This is especially true if you’re a nobody at a small company. How many times do you get an audience with the CEO of your company. Probably not very much. However, on social media you have the open opportunity for them to see what you’re doing and you to engage them on topics that matter to you. Much of this can happen naturally. Just be yourself and you’ll be surprised how effective that can be.

Of course, like I’ve always said. Not everyone should do social media, but everyone could benefit from using social media. However, don’t let the misconceptions of what social media “is” deter you from trying it out and seeing where and how it can provide value. You can make it work for you.

10 Awesome Things About HIM Professionals to Celebrate HIP Week

Posted on April 6, 2016 I Written By

Erin Head is the Director of Health Information Management (HIM) and Quality for an acute care hospital in Titusville, FL. She is a renowned speaker on a variety of healthcare and social media topics and currently serves as CCHIIM Commissioner for AHIMA. She is heavily involved in many HIM and HIT initiatives such as information governance, health data analytics, and ICD-10 advocacy. She is active on social media on Twitter @ErinHead_HIM and LinkedIn. Subscribe to Erin's latest HIM Scene posts here.

April 3-9, 2016 is known as Health Information Professionals (HIP) week. This annual event is a great time for celebrating accomplishments and touting the diverse skills of HIM professionals. I came up with a list of great things for us to brag about during HIP week and every day:

  1. HIM Careers: There are roughly 180,000 HIM professionals in the United States. There are 15 nationally recognized professional credentials available for HIM. (Keep spreading the word so we are recognized when asked what we do for a living. We are not just Medical Records!)
  2. Information Governance: HIM professionals are the gatekeepers of health information and are perfectly apt to take on new exciting roles in Information Governance and Data Analytics.
  3. Advocacy: HIM professionals are in Washington, DC this week advocating for a unique patient safety identifier- My Health ID. Be sure to sign the petition to remove the ban that prevents HHS from working on this important endeavor.
  4. ICD-10: ICD-10-CM and ICD-10-PCS coding classification systems were successfully implemented in October 2015 and are providing more specificity and detail to health data for documentation quality improvement and secondary data usage.
  5. Job Growth: There is a projected job growth of 18-26% in HIM positions in 2016. Source: Monster.com
  6. Remote Coding: Many medical coding professionals are able to work remotely from home.
  7. Social Media: A new hashtag for HIM social media conversations was started this week- #HIMsocial.
  8. Networking: We have great networking opportunities in HIM – conferences, online forums, and social media are great ways to learn and share information. Lifelong friendships and strategic relationships are always waiting to be made.
  9. HIPAA: HIM professionals ensure protected health information is kept secure and released only to the correct individuals who have a need to know. This  protects healthcare consumers and prevents fines of millions of dollars for healthcare organizations annually.
  10. Versatility: HIM professionals are versatile and can provide many benefits to different healthcare settings including hospitals, physician offices, EMR vendors, auditors, and insurance providers among many others.

Happy HIP Week to all! Celebrate your success and that of our great HIM community!

If you’d like to receive future HIM posts by Erin in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

What Happens After We Get Access to Our Medical Records?

Posted on March 18, 2016 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin is a true believer in #HealthIT, social media and empowered patients. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He currently leads the marketing efforts for @PatientPrompt, a Stericycle product. Colin’s Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung

Over the past few years, there has been a growing choir of patient voices asking for access to medical records. It started with a few courageous e-patients asking for their data – most notably David deBronkart aka @ePatientDave and Regina Holldiay @ReginaHolliday.

Now with the proliferation of tracking devices and wellness apps, more and more people are joining the choir including: vendors, government agencies and leading medical institutions. Although progress is still slow, it is now possible to imagine a day when all patients will have free and open access to their medical record.

This week’s #hcldr tweetchat asked the question…So What Next? What would be the first thing you would do if you had complete access to your own medical record? Below are some of the more interesting and notable answers.

Correcting errors in the medical record in order to avoid future adverse events was the most popular answer from the #hcldr community. Sharing the medical record was a close second:

There were a few data geeks in the #hcldr crowd who saw access as an opportunity to mine the record:

I think @mloxton is spot on with his tweet. I would definitely do the same – mostly to find out if there was a pattern in my medical record that could help predict future health issues. Armed with that information I would then make changes to my current behavior.

The most interesting use of medical record data came from Andy DeLaO @CancerGeek:

I’m thinking the world could use a few more @CancerGeeks…even virtual ones.

Matthew Katz MD had the most thought-provoking tweet relating to medical records:

Nothing comes without a price and Katz’s tweet certainly highlights a potential headache if the level of health literacy is not improved ahead of open access to medical records. I have faith though, that over the next few years we will see many more startups with technologies that can read medical records and produce plain-language interpretations as well as recommendations. That utopia can’t come soon enough.

For a curated summary of the #hcldr chat see this Storify.

What would you do if you had access to your medical record?

Dr. Rasu Shrestha Helps Injured Passenger Enroute to #HIMSS16

Posted on March 1, 2016 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin is a true believer in #HealthIT, social media and empowered patients. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He currently leads the marketing efforts for @PatientPrompt, a Stericycle product. Colin’s Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung

One of the most interesting aspects of HIMSS are the stories that emerge during the conference. There are the “macro” stories like the announcements of new joint ventures and there are the “micro” stories of individual triumphs.

I love the personal stories that I hear/over-hear at HIMSS. Over the years I find that I remember these personal tales more vividly than I do the product announcements. Yesterday on #HIMSS16 Day 1, I heard the most incredible story in my nine years of attending the conference.
Rasu Shrestha
Rasu Shrestha MD MBA @RasuShrestha, Chief Innovation Officer at UPMC and Executive Vice President at UPMC Enterprises shared with me how he treated an injured passenger on his flight to Las Vegas for #HIMSS16.

Shortly after taking off from Pittsburgh airport, a straight-out-of-TV request came over the plane’s PA system: “Is there a medical doctor on board? If so, please identify yourself to the crew.” As with all other flights to Las Vegas this week, the plane was filled with fellow HIMSS attendees, but only Dr. Shrestha identified himself as an MD. He was quickly brought to an unconscious passenger in the aisle near the back of the plane.

The fallen man had collapsed on the way to the restroom and had hit his head on one of the foot rests, causing a gash on his forehead. When Dr. Shrestha arrived the man was bleeding profusely. After quickly assessing the situation, he sprang into action. Using only the plane’s first aid kit, Dr. Shrestha staunched the bleeding but the man remained unconscious. At this point two nurses who happened to be on board, came to help Dr. Shrestha and together they managed to stabilize the injured man.

“Had they had a suture kit on board I would have dressed his head injury right there on the plane” said Shrestha, “It was clear to me he needed stitches.”

The impromptu care team did so well that the man was able to complete the flight to Las Vegas without an emergency landing. Paramedics met the plane on arrival and took the injured man to a local hospital. He is recovering nicely. In recognition for his good deed, all the passengers and flight crew gave Dr. Shrestha an enthusiastic round of applause.

As Dr. Shrestha finished his story, it was easy to see how moved he was by this gesture from his fellow passengers – most of whom are part of the Pittsburgh healthcare community.

For me, this is likely going to be the most memorable story of #HIMSS16 – or any HIMSS for that matter…and we’re only on Day 1!

Great Healthcare IT Leaders

Posted on January 25, 2016 I Written By

David is a global digital healthcare leader that is focusing on the next era of healthcare IT.  Most recently David served as the CIO at an academic medical center where he was responsible for all technology related to the three missions of education, research and patient care. David has worked for various healthcare providers ranging from academic medical centers, non-profit, and the for-profit sectors. Subscribe to David's latest CXO Scene posts here.

As we prepare for the upcoming HIMSS conference on Feb 29 – Mar 4, 2016, I encourage the community to connect with these top thought leaders who will go above and beyond in engaging with the community. Looking forward to catching up in Vegas.
himss16 cio

Aaron Miri CIO at Walnut Hill Medical Center @AaronMiri 
Anna Turman CIO at Chadron Community Hospital and Health Services @iamTurman
Chad Eckes Board Member at NC HIMSS
Chris Belmont CIO at MD Anderson Cancer Center @CBelmont88 
Cletis Earle CIO at St. Luke’s Cornwall Hospital
Cris Ross CIO at Mayo Clinic
Darren Dworkin CIO at Cedar Sinai Medical Center @DworkinDarren
Dave Miller CIO at Optimum Healthcare IT @dlmilleroptimum
Dick Escue CIO at Valley View Hospital
Drex DeFord CIO Advisor @drexdeford 
Edward Marx CIO at The Advisory Board @marxists
Gareth Sherlock CIO at Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi
Gene Thomas CIO at Memorial Hospital of Gulfport
James Brady CIO, Kaiser Permanente Orange County
Jay Ferro CIO at American Cancer Center @jayferro 
John Delano CIO at Integris health
John Halamka CIO at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center @jhalamka
John Jay Kenagy CIO at Legacy Health
Jon Manis CIO at Sutter Health
Joseph Hobbs Regional CIO at NetApp @JOEtheCIO 
Kristin Darby CIO at Cancer Treatment Centers of America @khdarby
Marc Chasin CIO & CMIO at St. Luke’s Health System @M_Chasin
Marc Probst CIO at Intermountain Health @probst_marc
Michael Archuleta CIO at MT San Rafael Hospital @Michael81082
Mike Reagin CIO at Sentara Healthcare
Patrick Anderson CIO at Hoag Memorial
Pravene Nath CIO at Stanford Health @pravenenath
Robin Sarkar CIO at Lakeland Regional Health System
Sarah Richardson CIO at NCH Healthcare System @conciergeleader 
Scott Maclean Deputy CIO at Partners Health @stmaclean
Shafiq Rab CIO at Hackensack University Medical Center @CIOSHAFIQ
Steve Huffman CIO at Beacon Health System @SteveHuffman_IN
Steve Stanic CIO at Baptist Health (Jackson, MS)
Sue Schade CIO Advisor @sgschade 
Todd Richardson CIO at Aspirus
Will Weider CIO at Ministry Health @CandidCIO 

Let us know if you think there’s someone else you think we should add to the list. We always love to learn about new people that are worth following.

If you’d like to receive future health care C-Level executive posts by David in your inbox, you can subscribe to future Health Care CXO Scene posts here.

Social Media 101 For Healthcare CXOs – Part 2

Posted on January 14, 2016 I Written By

David is a global digital healthcare leader that is focusing on the next era of healthcare IT.  Most recently David served as the CIO at an academic medical center where he was responsible for all technology related to the three missions of education, research and patient care. David has worked for various healthcare providers ranging from academic medical centers, non-profit, and the for-profit sectors. Subscribe to David's latest CXO Scene posts here.

This is a follow up to my last blog post regarding social media for CXOs.   I increased my action on social networking sites around four years ago when another new employment in Abu Dhabi forced a vast physical separation between me, my colleagues and critical emerging trends in healthcare IT back in the United States. I’ve been a daily Twitter and LinkedIn client from that point forward.

Social media provided the platform to build up solid associations and relationships with different influencers and pioneers in the industry. I also utilize social media to recruit talent, promote the organization’s achievements, speak internally with staff, and update everyone on rising trends.

Leaders who have a big department may not have the capacity to converse with each individual worker. I attempt to use social as one of the communication tool in addition to face-to-face time in order to share my thoughts about where we’re going from a strategy initiatives perspective. I also use the channel to share articles related to industry trends so people can keep up with what’s going on in the market.

My day by day online networking routine starts in the early mornings, before work, and after that continue in full drive following my workday. Social networking is not something you can simply say, ‘I’m going to go through an hour with it”,  You truly live it in small increments throughout your day.

Twitter as dynamic news feed
Twitter is currently my go-to news feed in the morning, and I utilize it to locate the most recent updates, news articles and critique on the healthcare business. Twitter is a decent place for individuals to share thoughts, or what’s at the forefront from the various industry thought leaders.  The majority of the Fortune 500 companies’ CEOs or executive groups are on Twitter sharing what’s happening to their businesses, and what’s happening with their organizations. This forum is a great place where you can get a genuine glimpse from the thought leader’s perspectives.  

I consider social important, however I don’t feel the need to post, or check in consistently.  On the off chance that I have a five-minute or 10-minute gap, I will examine what’s going on. I’ll check my notifications. However, I’m not always on my telephone checking the social stream.

LinkedIn for networking and career success
During the previous year, I began blogging, and I tried to routinely share thoughts on LinkedIn’s publishing platform. I appreciate the feedback I get on industry-specific topics and leadership. LinkedIn likewise allows me make and reinforce proficient connections for networking opportunities and professional success.

My Tips
Let me offer a few tips for CXOs who need to hone their social media methodologies from my experience.  First, CXOs ought to do all that they can to cooperate with their social connections. Use social to drive engagement, whether it’s with your associates, your staff or even your bosses. Listening is also key, and CXOs ought to grasp at the chance to act as a sounding boards for others. You truly need to listen and see what’s out there since many have alternate points of view that can expand your thinking on a topic.  

Lastly, CXOs have to invest the time to decide how social tools function best for them.   As I mentioned earlier, social can be an incredible tool for recruiting, department branding and personal branding. However, it takes exertion and work. It’s not something you can benefit from simply because you made a Twitter account and sat back waiting for people to follow you.

For me, social media is mostly a conduit for learning and a springboard to test ideas. Plus, it’s a platform to connect and engage with new thought leaders. If you are looking to jump start your learning and engagement, I definitely encourage everyone to get on a social media platform and start connecting and having discussions. Take the initial step to connect with others. You can start your initial discussion with me on the various social platforms I am using: Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook.

If you’d like to receive future health care C-Level executive posts by David in your inbox, you can subscribe to future Health Care CXO Scene posts here.

Social Media 101 For Healthcare CXOs

Posted on December 21, 2015 I Written By

David is a global digital healthcare leader that is focusing on the next era of healthcare IT.  Most recently David served as the CIO at an academic medical center where he was responsible for all technology related to the three missions of education, research and patient care. David has worked for various healthcare providers ranging from academic medical centers, non-profit, and the for-profit sectors. Subscribe to David's latest CXO Scene posts here.

Social media has been a channel that has been overlooked by executives in the past, but I am starting to see the shift in the trend now. I get questioned a lot from many of my peers and colleagues as to how they should start their social engagement and what are some tips for executive users. The сhоісеѕ in social mеdіа саn bе оvеr-whеlmіng and there аrе ѕо mаnу ѕіtеѕ tо сhооѕе frоm that it can be hard to know where to start. Plus, іf writing іѕn’t part оf уоur еvеrуdау рrасtісе it саn bе a сhаllеngе tо thіnk аbоut аddіng a wrіtіng rоutіnе tо a buѕу ѕсhеdulе filled with back to back meetings all day. Sаvе уоurѕеlf time аnd fаіlеd еffоrtѕ. Here’s some common quеѕtіоnѕ tо give you a hеаd-ѕtаrt оn dеvеlоріng уоur ѕосіаl mеdіа strategy:

Whо Am I Cоnnесtіng Wіth?
Whеthеr уоu are a CEO, CIO, COO, or any CXO role in the organization, іt’ѕ іmроrtаnt tо decide whо уоu wіll bе соnnесtіng wіth. Iѕ уоur іntеnt tо buіld rеlаtіоnѕhірѕ wіth juѕt уоur staff members or customers? Or dо you want to be more engaged with your peers? This answer will dictate the strategy of defining your personal brand on the social media channels.

Whаt Wіll I Pоѕt?
Dау tо dау rесарѕ lіkе “I juѕt wаlkеd thе dоg” do nоt quаlіfу аѕ professional роѕtѕ оn ѕосіаl mеdіа ассоuntѕ. In fасt, thеу ѕhоuld bе avoided ѕо уоur fоllоwеrѕ dоn’t get the wrоng іdеа аbоut уоur рrоfеѕѕіоnаlіѕm. If уоu dіdn’t сrеаtе a ѕtrаtеgу bеfоrе уоu started uѕіng ѕосіаl mеdіа, thеn іt’ѕ time tо rеgrоuр аnd соmе uр wіth a рlаn. Chооѕе уоur ѕubjесt mаttеr аnd fіnd quаlіtу ѕоurсеѕ fоr tорісаl nеwѕ аnd іnfоrmаtіоn tо ѕhаrе wіth уоur connections.

Whаt is YOUR Sосіаl Mеdіа Pоlісу?
Who will you connect with on the social media channels? Are you going to connect with everyone? My recommendation is to use social as a vehicle to communicate with the world. If you don’t build up a personal brand and maintain a strong social media presence, you are missing out on the connection opportunity.

Hоw Wіll People Knоw I’m Aсtіvе іn Sосіаl Mеdіа?
Yоu hаvе tо аѕѕumе thаt реорlе wоn’t knоw уоu аrе роѕtіng unlеѕѕ уоu tеll thеm. If уоu’rе ѕеndіng оut еіthеr a рrіntеd nеwѕlеttеr оr аn еmаіl nеwѕlеttеr, аѕk for fоllоwеrѕ! If your рrасtісе sends bіrthdау саrdѕ, lеt thеm knоw thеу саn ѕtау bеttеr іn tоuсh thrоughоut thе уеаr vіа social mеdіа аnd nаmе thе ассоunt уоu use. Yоu саn uѕе office rесоrdѕ tо dеvеlор a lіѕt оf соnnесtіоnѕ tо mаkе. In thе іnvіtаtіоn tо соnnесt, juѕt bе ѕurе tо іnсludе іn a lіnk аnd еxрlаnаtіоn оf уоur іntеnt аnd рrіvасу роlісу tо hеlр еаѕе роѕѕіblе раtіеnt соnсеrnѕ.  Stay tuned for the next blog on my personal strategy for social media. Make sure we are connected on the various channels below:

If you’d like to receive future health care C-Level executive posts by David in your inbox, you can subscribe to future Health Care CXO Scene posts here.