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Great Healthcare IT Leaders

Posted on January 25, 2016 I Written By

David is a global digital healthcare leader that is focusing on the next era of healthcare IT.  Most recently David served as the CIO at an academic medical center where he was responsible for all technology related to the three missions of education, research and patient care. David has worked for various healthcare providers ranging from academic medical centers, non-profit, and the for-profit sectors. Subscribe to David's latest CXO Scene posts here.

As we prepare for the upcoming HIMSS conference on Feb 29 – Mar 4, 2016, I encourage the community to connect with these top thought leaders who will go above and beyond in engaging with the community. Looking forward to catching up in Vegas.
himss16 cio

Aaron Miri CIO at Walnut Hill Medical Center @AaronMiri 
Anna Turman CIO at Chadron Community Hospital and Health Services @iamTurman
Chad Eckes Board Member at NC HIMSS
Chris Belmont CIO at MD Anderson Cancer Center @CBelmont88 
Cletis Earle CIO at St. Luke’s Cornwall Hospital
Cris Ross CIO at Mayo Clinic
Darren Dworkin CIO at Cedar Sinai Medical Center @DworkinDarren
Dave Miller CIO at Optimum Healthcare IT @dlmilleroptimum
Dick Escue CIO at Valley View Hospital
Drex DeFord CIO Advisor @drexdeford 
Edward Marx CIO at The Advisory Board @marxists
Gareth Sherlock CIO at Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi
Gene Thomas CIO at Memorial Hospital of Gulfport
James Brady CIO, Kaiser Permanente Orange County
Jay Ferro CIO at American Cancer Center @jayferro 
John Delano CIO at Integris health
John Halamka CIO at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center @jhalamka
John Jay Kenagy CIO at Legacy Health
Jon Manis CIO at Sutter Health
Joseph Hobbs Regional CIO at NetApp @JOEtheCIO 
Kristin Darby CIO at Cancer Treatment Centers of America @khdarby
Marc Chasin CIO & CMIO at St. Luke’s Health System @M_Chasin
Marc Probst CIO at Intermountain Health @probst_marc
Michael Archuleta CIO at MT San Rafael Hospital @Michael81082
Mike Reagin CIO at Sentara Healthcare
Patrick Anderson CIO at Hoag Memorial
Pravene Nath CIO at Stanford Health @pravenenath
Robin Sarkar CIO at Lakeland Regional Health System
Sarah Richardson CIO at NCH Healthcare System @conciergeleader 
Scott Maclean Deputy CIO at Partners Health @stmaclean
Shafiq Rab CIO at Hackensack University Medical Center @CIOSHAFIQ
Steve Huffman CIO at Beacon Health System @SteveHuffman_IN
Steve Stanic CIO at Baptist Health (Jackson, MS)
Sue Schade CIO Advisor @sgschade 
Todd Richardson CIO at Aspirus
Will Weider CIO at Ministry Health @CandidCIO 

Let us know if you think there’s someone else you think we should add to the list. We always love to learn about new people that are worth following.

If you’d like to receive future health care C-Level executive posts by David in your inbox, you can subscribe to future Health Care CXO Scene posts here.

Social Media 101 For Healthcare CXOs – Part 2

Posted on January 14, 2016 I Written By

David is a global digital healthcare leader that is focusing on the next era of healthcare IT.  Most recently David served as the CIO at an academic medical center where he was responsible for all technology related to the three missions of education, research and patient care. David has worked for various healthcare providers ranging from academic medical centers, non-profit, and the for-profit sectors. Subscribe to David's latest CXO Scene posts here.

This is a follow up to my last blog post regarding social media for CXOs.   I increased my action on social networking sites around four years ago when another new employment in Abu Dhabi forced a vast physical separation between me, my colleagues and critical emerging trends in healthcare IT back in the United States. I’ve been a daily Twitter and LinkedIn client from that point forward.

Social media provided the platform to build up solid associations and relationships with different influencers and pioneers in the industry. I also utilize social media to recruit talent, promote the organization’s achievements, speak internally with staff, and update everyone on rising trends.

Leaders who have a big department may not have the capacity to converse with each individual worker. I attempt to use social as one of the communication tool in addition to face-to-face time in order to share my thoughts about where we’re going from a strategy initiatives perspective. I also use the channel to share articles related to industry trends so people can keep up with what’s going on in the market.

My day by day online networking routine starts in the early mornings, before work, and after that continue in full drive following my workday. Social networking is not something you can simply say, ‘I’m going to go through an hour with it”,  You truly live it in small increments throughout your day.

Twitter as dynamic news feed
Twitter is currently my go-to news feed in the morning, and I utilize it to locate the most recent updates, news articles and critique on the healthcare business. Twitter is a decent place for individuals to share thoughts, or what’s at the forefront from the various industry thought leaders.  The majority of the Fortune 500 companies’ CEOs or executive groups are on Twitter sharing what’s happening to their businesses, and what’s happening with their organizations. This forum is a great place where you can get a genuine glimpse from the thought leader’s perspectives.  

I consider social important, however I don’t feel the need to post, or check in consistently.  On the off chance that I have a five-minute or 10-minute gap, I will examine what’s going on. I’ll check my notifications. However, I’m not always on my telephone checking the social stream.

LinkedIn for networking and career success
During the previous year, I began blogging, and I tried to routinely share thoughts on LinkedIn’s publishing platform. I appreciate the feedback I get on industry-specific topics and leadership. LinkedIn likewise allows me make and reinforce proficient connections for networking opportunities and professional success.

My Tips
Let me offer a few tips for CXOs who need to hone their social media methodologies from my experience.  First, CXOs ought to do all that they can to cooperate with their social connections. Use social to drive engagement, whether it’s with your associates, your staff or even your bosses. Listening is also key, and CXOs ought to grasp at the chance to act as a sounding boards for others. You truly need to listen and see what’s out there since many have alternate points of view that can expand your thinking on a topic.  

Lastly, CXOs have to invest the time to decide how social tools function best for them.   As I mentioned earlier, social can be an incredible tool for recruiting, department branding and personal branding. However, it takes exertion and work. It’s not something you can benefit from simply because you made a Twitter account and sat back waiting for people to follow you.

For me, social media is mostly a conduit for learning and a springboard to test ideas. Plus, it’s a platform to connect and engage with new thought leaders. If you are looking to jump start your learning and engagement, I definitely encourage everyone to get on a social media platform and start connecting and having discussions. Take the initial step to connect with others. You can start your initial discussion with me on the various social platforms I am using: Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook.

If you’d like to receive future health care C-Level executive posts by David in your inbox, you can subscribe to future Health Care CXO Scene posts here.

Social Media 101 For Healthcare CXOs

Posted on December 21, 2015 I Written By

David is a global digital healthcare leader that is focusing on the next era of healthcare IT.  Most recently David served as the CIO at an academic medical center where he was responsible for all technology related to the three missions of education, research and patient care. David has worked for various healthcare providers ranging from academic medical centers, non-profit, and the for-profit sectors. Subscribe to David's latest CXO Scene posts here.

Social media has been a channel that has been overlooked by executives in the past, but I am starting to see the shift in the trend now. I get questioned a lot from many of my peers and colleagues as to how they should start their social engagement and what are some tips for executive users. The сhоісеѕ in social mеdіа саn bе оvеr-whеlmіng and there аrе ѕо mаnу ѕіtеѕ tо сhооѕе frоm that it can be hard to know where to start. Plus, іf writing іѕn’t part оf уоur еvеrуdау рrасtісе it саn bе a сhаllеngе tо thіnk аbоut аddіng a wrіtіng rоutіnе tо a buѕу ѕсhеdulе filled with back to back meetings all day. Sаvе уоurѕеlf time аnd fаіlеd еffоrtѕ. Here’s some common quеѕtіоnѕ tо give you a hеаd-ѕtаrt оn dеvеlоріng уоur ѕосіаl mеdіа strategy:

Whо Am I Cоnnесtіng Wіth?
Whеthеr уоu are a CEO, CIO, COO, or any CXO role in the organization, іt’ѕ іmроrtаnt tо decide whо уоu wіll bе соnnесtіng wіth. Iѕ уоur іntеnt tо buіld rеlаtіоnѕhірѕ wіth juѕt уоur staff members or customers? Or dо you want to be more engaged with your peers? This answer will dictate the strategy of defining your personal brand on the social media channels.

Whаt Wіll I Pоѕt?
Dау tо dау rесарѕ lіkе “I juѕt wаlkеd thе dоg” do nоt quаlіfу аѕ professional роѕtѕ оn ѕосіаl mеdіа ассоuntѕ. In fасt, thеу ѕhоuld bе avoided ѕо уоur fоllоwеrѕ dоn’t get the wrоng іdеа аbоut уоur рrоfеѕѕіоnаlіѕm. If уоu dіdn’t сrеаtе a ѕtrаtеgу bеfоrе уоu started uѕіng ѕосіаl mеdіа, thеn іt’ѕ time tо rеgrоuр аnd соmе uр wіth a рlаn. Chооѕе уоur ѕubjесt mаttеr аnd fіnd quаlіtу ѕоurсеѕ fоr tорісаl nеwѕ аnd іnfоrmаtіоn tо ѕhаrе wіth уоur connections.

Whаt is YOUR Sосіаl Mеdіа Pоlісу?
Who will you connect with on the social media channels? Are you going to connect with everyone? My recommendation is to use social as a vehicle to communicate with the world. If you don’t build up a personal brand and maintain a strong social media presence, you are missing out on the connection opportunity.

Hоw Wіll People Knоw I’m Aсtіvе іn Sосіаl Mеdіа?
Yоu hаvе tо аѕѕumе thаt реорlе wоn’t knоw уоu аrе роѕtіng unlеѕѕ уоu tеll thеm. If уоu’rе ѕеndіng оut еіthеr a рrіntеd nеwѕlеttеr оr аn еmаіl nеwѕlеttеr, аѕk for fоllоwеrѕ! If your рrасtісе sends bіrthdау саrdѕ, lеt thеm knоw thеу саn ѕtау bеttеr іn tоuсh thrоughоut thе уеаr vіа social mеdіа аnd nаmе thе ассоunt уоu use. Yоu саn uѕе office rесоrdѕ tо dеvеlор a lіѕt оf соnnесtіоnѕ tо mаkе. In thе іnvіtаtіоn tо соnnесt, juѕt bе ѕurе tо іnсludе іn a lіnk аnd еxрlаnаtіоn оf уоur іntеnt аnd рrіvасу роlісу tо hеlр еаѕе роѕѕіblе раtіеnt соnсеrnѕ.  Stay tuned for the next blog on my personal strategy for social media. Make sure we are connected on the various channels below:

If you’d like to receive future health care C-Level executive posts by David in your inbox, you can subscribe to future Health Care CXO Scene posts here.

The Power of Networking in HIM

Posted on November 4, 2015 I Written By

Erin Head is the Director of Health Information Management (HIM) and Quality for an acute care hospital in Titusville, FL. She is a renowned speaker on a variety of healthcare and social media topics and currently serves as CCHIIM Commissioner for AHIMA. She is heavily involved in many HIM and HIT initiatives such as information governance, health data analytics, and ICD-10 advocacy. She is active on social media on Twitter @ErinHead_HIM and LinkedIn. Subscribe to Erin's latest HIM Scene posts here.

I have always been a huge proponent of networking with other HIM professionals. Even when I was a student, I found great value in meeting other students who were going through all of the same milestones of HIM education. Talking with seasoned HIM professionals was a great way to discover what the HIM field had to offer, who I needed to be introduced to, and what I needed to do to land a job in HIM.

As a more seasoned HIM professional, there is even more value in networking with peers. It’s great to know you are not alone because there many others out there going through the exact same issues (such as ICD-10, reimbursement changes, regulatory requirements, etc.). We always say that HIM is a small world and it really is true. It seems you can travel to any part of the country for a conference and run into someone you know or someone who knows someone you know through networking.

It appears that HIM product vendors know how important networking is to HIM professionals therefore they seek opportunities to bring current, preferably happy customers together with prospective customers through seminars and social gatherings. This sets the stage for socializing and sharing experiences with certain products and gives potential customers a contact to reach out to in the future. Many lasting friendships are also made in the process.

Another great way to meet like-minded HIM professionals is through volunteering. Organizations and conference event planners are always looking for engaged volunteers to help and there are many benefits to both the organization and the volunteer. There is a lot to be learned through volunteering and it can open up many new opportunities through the experience.

Networking doesn’t have to be confined to in-person meetings and conferences. There are many opportunities to network through social media and various online forums. In a previous post, I made a plea for more HIM professionals to take advantage of the vast networking opportunities on Twitter. There are subject matter experts for almost anything you can imagine and they are usually accessible and responsive through virtual networking. I have had many conversations with HIM professionals I have found through LinkedIn and Twitter long before I met them in person. The benefit of using social media for virtual networking is that it can be done at any time and fit into anyone’s schedule. In-person meetings are great but may only be once per year, too far geographically, expensive, or may have scheduling conflicts.

Networking is not only successful for talking business but it’s also fun to get to know others with similar interests and backgrounds. With the many different opportunities and venues to enhance networking, it is convenient for almost any schedule or situation. Do take the time to partake in in-person networking, virtual networking, volunteering, or all of the above (and bring your business cards). The professional and personal benefits are endless.

If you’d like to receive future HIM posts by Erin in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

Are We Patients or Healthcare Consumers?

Posted on September 15, 2015 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin is a true believer in #HealthIT, social media and empowered patients. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He currently leads the marketing efforts for @PatientPrompt, a Stericycle product. Colin’s Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung

Hello My Name is 221-365 - Robert Occhialini

On the weekly #hcldr tweetchat last Tuesday, I posed the question “Are we patients or healthcare consumers?” What resulted was a flurry of comments that made it clear that people are very divided on the issue.

Some like Laurel Ann Whitlock (@twirlandswirl) felt that the consumer moniker is appropriate:

Others like Sarah Greene (@researchmatters) and @EyeSteve felt the opposite:

This line of thought is interesting. There is an underlying assumption that “consumer” implies a commoditized and transparent market – one where the service, outcomes and pricing are all well known to the individual making the purchasing decision. Most of healthcare doesn’t fit into this nice little box – except with routine health/wellness visits. For many this is where the consumer analogy breaks down. People do not feel like consumers not because they don’t want to be, but because healthcare is so confusing and opaque that normal consumer behavior is the exception rather than the rule. There was a little bit of negativity directed at calling patients consumers, a sentiment that was called into question by none other than Dr. Nick van Terheyden (@drnic1):


Steve Sisko (@ShimCode) put forth the notion that this shouldn’t be an either/or discussion:

I agree with both gentlemen. I don’t think there is anything inherently bad about being a healthcare consumer. It would be wonderful to have a system where we were all so healthy that our interaction with healthcare providers was a simple transaction. I believe that for the most part, “patient” is the appropriate name because it speaks to the deeper relationship with healthcare providers. This is especially true for those with chronic conditions and rare diseases.

D’Anna Holmes (@PoPculture_px) summed up the discussion nicely:

 

Integrating Social Media Data Into Healthcare Graphic

Posted on August 21, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today, during the #HITsm chat, Charles Webster (The workflow addict), shared this interesting graphic on how social media gets integrated into the healthcare workflow. I’d never seen it before today, so I was glad he shared it:

I’m not sure I understand all the lines and abbreviations on the graphic, but the things that resonated to me was the size of the social media funnel and how we need to take that mass of data (much of which is useless) and funnel it down into usable data which then gets funneled down into actionable tasks.

This is actually a lesson for all data in healthcare. The process is the same. Social media is just another form of data. I’ve only seen a few cases where organizations have done this process already, but over the next 5 years we’re going to see thousands of ways this is done to improve healthcare. It’s very exciting for me to consider.

We Need More HIM Professionals Actively Using Twitter

Posted on August 3, 2015 I Written By

Erin Head is the Director of Health Information Management (HIM) and Quality for an acute care hospital in Titusville, FL. She is a renowned speaker on a variety of healthcare and social media topics and currently serves as CCHIIM Commissioner for AHIMA. She is heavily involved in many HIM and HIT initiatives such as information governance, health data analytics, and ICD-10 advocacy. She is active on social media on Twitter @ErinHead_HIM and LinkedIn. Subscribe to Erin's latest HIM Scene posts here.

We’d like to welcome a new guest blogger to our ranks. If you’re on social media and enjoy HIM topics, then you’ve probably seen Erin Head (@ErinHead_HIM) tweeting about those subjects. Erin is the HIM Director at an acute care hospital in Florida and a real advocate for the HIM profession. I’m excited to have her blogging with us from her unique perspective.

When I look around on Twitter, I don’t see enough Health Information Management (HIM) professionals. Most of the people I interact with have health IT or Informatics-focused careers and are not what we refer to as “traditional HIM professionals.” Don’t get me wrong, there are many engaged HIM professionals on Twitter; however the participation level is nowhere near matching the workforce population.

Why is that? I do not believe it is a generational difference as my Twitter interactions have been with people from all ages and backgrounds. There has to be another reason. Are HIM professionals really “too busy” to take advantage of the wealth of knowledge and networking available on social media? Is it rude or disengaging to use social media in the physical presence of others?

This is no excuse – Twitter is very easy to navigate and the content is constantly updating so it is available no matter what time of day or how long you choose to login and interact. Following thought leaders on Twitter or a simple hashtag search will get you instantly connected with others and will get you comfortable using the application quickly. Do HIM professionals feel they are already subject matter experts and don’t need to join the Twitter conversation about new innovations, technology, and changing regulatory matters? If that is the case, I would certainly hope that traditional HIM professionals are garnering this knowledge somewhere else other than social media.

HIMers are a tight-knit group who look forward to annual conferences and events to catch up with fellow HIM professionals and gather information. This in-person interaction is great, but why wait for these events to network and converse? If you are unable to travel to attend an event, a great benefit is “live-Tweeting” where others will share the information that is being learned at an event with those who may not be able to attend in-person. But you must follow the event attendees by using the hashtag associated with the conference; in other words, you must be an active participant in social media to take advantage of this benefit.

Social media gives us an instant connection to other engaged professionals and gives us an opportunity to learn from each other, no matter where we are located physically. Selfishly, I want more interaction with HIM professionals through social media- traditional and non-traditional alike! I encourage all HIM professionals to create a Twitter account (or dust off an unused account) and start connecting. There really is no excuse to miss out on valuable, real-time HIM networking and information that is available at your fingertips.

If you’d like to receive future HIM posts by Erin in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

Are 3 Square Meals the Key to Avoiding Hospitalizations?

Posted on July 16, 2015 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin is a true believer in #HealthIT, social media and empowered patients. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He currently leads the marketing efforts for @PatientPrompt, a Stericycle product. Colin’s Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung

We’d like to welcome a new guest blogger to our ranks. If you’re on social media, you probably know Colin Hung (@Colin_Hung), Co-Host of #hcldr. Colin is also head of Marketing for @PatientPrompt, a product offered by Stericycle Communication Solutions. We look forward to many posts from Colin in the future.

On our weekly #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat, we had two special guests who have done pioneering healthcare work – Leonard Kish (@LeonardKish) and Dave Chase (@chasedave). Together Kish and Chase authored the #95Theses, a wonderful call-to-action for those of us in healthcare that’s written in same style as the seminal Cluertain Manifesto.

The first topic of last night’s #hcldr chat was “What are some creative/effective ways patients can use to avoid hospitalizations?”. There were many interesting and insightful answers, but one tweet from Chase really caught my eye:

The first statement was fascinating – Meals on Wheels as a way to reduce hospital admissions.

This concept is at the heart of the discussion around Social Determinants of Health (#sdoh) – a topic that has gotten a lot of buzz over the past couple of years. There is a really great definition of SDOH on the WHO website. I’d also recommend this blog post from John Lynn on a similar topic from earlier this year.

As we move towards a system that is based on wellness rather than sickness, I wonder if healthcare providers and organizations will look to preventative measures such as providing meals or teaching basic nutrition as a way to keep their communities healthy? Will the day come when this type of service will become necessary for a provider to remain relevant?

I doubt that most providers and healthcare organizations will reach this point by their own volition. However, I do believe that some innovative organization and entrepreneurial companies will emerge that will make this a reality in specific communities.

I would love to see a future where we will have community wellness centers where we used to have hospitals – places where local people can gather to learn about how to stay healthy and get social as well as emotional support from their peers. These centers would be helped by a network of technologies that combine an individual’s personally tracked data with insights gleaned from “Big Data” analytics resulting in a personalized wellness plan. A plan that includes recommendations for 3 square meals each day that would optimize a person’s health and has the facilities to then create those meals and a mechanism to deliver them (especially to elder adults who lack mobility).

I am excited and intrigued by the possibility that something as simple as a meal can be the key ingredient in reducing healthcare costs while improving health.

Know anyone who is doing this already?

Finding New People on Healthcare Social Media and The Power of Showing Gratitude

Posted on July 13, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I know that many in healthcare aren’t sure how to get started with social media. The reality is that Twitter is not very fun until you’re following 50-100 smart people that share interesting content, tweets, images, and videos. Once you do that, your entire Twitter experience changes because it’s a great font of learning and connection.

In case you don’t read one of my other blogs, EMR and HIPAA (and if you don’t why don’t you?), we recently announced the #HIT99. For those that don’t want to click into the post, you can basically include the hashtag #HIT99 in a tweet along with someone you want to nominate for the #HIT99 and why you’re nominating them. You can see that a lot of #HIT99 nominations have occurred.

For those of you new to social media, following people nominated to the #HIT99 is a great way for you to discover smart, interesting people in healthcare IT. Follow 50-100 people nominated and you’ll start to love Twitter and all you learn on it. The #HIT99 is a smorgasborg of social media discovery and connection. Finding new, interesting people to follow is always a treat. The #HIT99 provides the perfect opportunity to find and connect with new people you’d have never “met” otherwise.

Of course, if you’re already on social media, there’s a lot more to the #HIT99 if you participate. The #HIT99 asks that you mention why you’re nominating someone. These displays of gratitude are powerful for you and the person receiving it. Even if you don’t want to participate in the #HIT99, think about doing something similar using whatever medium you prefer. It’s a powerful idea that will reap major rewards for everyone involved.

I look forward to many in the Hospital EMR and EHR community participating in the #HIT99. In case you need an example, here’s a nomination that I sent (and is a great person to follow):

Let’s let the social media connection and gratitude flow! We can use more of that in this world.

8 Things the Hospital Website of the Future Will Include

Posted on May 15, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The Wall Street Journal has an article that talks about what the hospital website of the future will look like. In the article, the writer offers these 8 suggestions for what a hospital website will include in the next 10 years:

  1. Real-time patient reviews and observations
  2. Quality ratings
  3. Your protected medical record
  4. Literally see a clinician, right now
  5. Advanced help with medications
  6. Prices
  7. Consumer specials
  8. Food ratings

The only one I’d really argue with is the quality ratings item. I think that measuring quality is a really challenging thing and I’m not sure anyone will do it well enough that hospitals will be publishing those ratings on their website.

What’s more important about this list is that almost every one of them could be implemented in a hospital today. There is nothing on the list is not easily achieved technically. A few of them have some financial challenges like “literally see a clinician, right now”, but many in telemedicine are working on that as well.

If I were to describe these changes, I’d suggest that the shift you see described is one of a website that looks to engage the patient versus today’s hospital website which generally tries to not engage the patient. This will be a welcome shift for patients and a major culture shift for hospitals.