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How Many Platforms Does Each Hospital Own?

Posted on June 2, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I was recently thinking about how nearly every healthcare IT company I talk to today has some sort of platform. Yes, even our beloved EHR vendors (or not so beloved) often talk about their EHR system as an EHR platform. Is there anything that’s implemented in healthcare IT today that’s not a platform? Everything seems to be a platform these days.

If they have hundreds of health IT systems, then they have hundreds of platforms.

Given this is the case, are they really all platforms? Do we need all of these platforms? Has the word platform just been corrupted and really doesn’t have any meaning any more?

I wonder if hospital CIOs now would be interested in purchasing a piece of healthcare IT software that wasn’t a platform. Would it be better to market a healthcare IT software product as a solution rather than a platform? I’m guessing that most hospital CIOs probably feel like they have plenty of platforms. Am I wrong?

I should be clear. I think the idea of creating a platform with something is a good thing. At least it’s a good thing if you define a platform as something that connects and integrates with other systems and software. This would be a good trend in healthcare since so many so called platforms were at best very closed platforms and at worst not platforms at all. If platform would be defined as being open and interoperable, then I would welcome all these platforms with open arms.

The problem is that I think many healthcare IT vendors (EHR vendors leading this charge) look at their platform as a way to entrench the customer with them. They want to create the end all be all platform that all of a hospital’s future healthcare IT purchases need to integrate with the hospital. This is where the platform idea can fall flat when it comes to health IT customers and patients.

I love a good platform as much as the next person. It’s a powerful way to do business and can really do amazing things to improve the care a patient receives and how efficient a healthcare organization can operate. However, once everything says their a platform it loses meaning. I think we’ve reached that point with the word platform.

Promoting Internal Innovation to Drive Healthcare Efficiency

Posted on June 1, 2017 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Peyman S. Zand, Partner, Pivot Point Consulting, a Vaco Company.

Technical innovation in healthcare has historically been viewed through the lens of disruption. As tech adoption in the industry matures, perceptions on the origin of innovation are evolving as well. Healthcare leadership teams are increasingly leaning on feedback from the front lines of care delivery to identify ways to eliminate waste and drive greater efficiency. Rather than leaving innovation up to third parties, many health organizations are formalizing programs to advance innovation within their own facilities.

There are two schools of thought on healthcare innovation. Some argue that the market’s unique challenges can only be understood by those in the field, leaving outside influencers destined to fail. Others view innovation success in outside markets as an opportunity for healthcare stakeholders to learn from the wins and losses of more technically progressive industries. By mimicking other industries’ approach to promoting innovation (as opposed to their byproducts) in our hospitals and health systems, healthcare can draw from the best of both worlds. What we know is that the process in which innovation is adopted is very similar in all industries. However, the types of innovations and specific models can and should be tailored to the healthcare industry.

Innovation in Healthcare: Three Examples at a  Glance

There are several examples of health organizations successfully forging a path to institutionalized innovation. University of Pittsburg Medical Center (UPMC), Intermountain Healthcare and Mayo Clinic have pioneered innovation programs that merge internal clinical expertise with technical innovators from vertical markets in and outside healthcare. This article highlights some of the ways these progressive organizations have achieved success.

Innovation at UPMC

UPMC Enterprises boasts a 200-person staff managed by top provider and payer executives at UPMC. The innovation team is presently engaged in more than a dozen commercial partnerships, including support for Vivify Health’s chronic care telehealth solutions, medCPU’s real-time decision support solutions and Health Catalyst’s data warehousing and analytics solutions. Each project is focused on the goal of improving patient outcomes. The innovation group was recently rumored to be partnering with Microsoft on machine learning initiatives and the results may have a profound impact on how we use technology in care delivery.

UPMC Enterprises supports entrepreneurs—both internal individuals and established companies—with capital, technical resources, partner networks, recruiting and marketing assistance to support innovation. Dedicated focus in the following areas lends structure to the innovation program:

  • Translational science
  • Improving outcomes
  • Infrastructure and efficiency
  • Consumer engagement

All profits generated from investments are reinvested to support further research and innovation.

Innovation at Intermountain Healthcare

Like UPMC, Intermountain’s Healthcare Transformation Lab supports innovation in the areas of telehealth and natural language processing (NLP), among others. Like most providers, one of Intermountain’s primary goals is controlling costs. The group’s self-developed NLP program is designed to help identify high-risk patients ahead of catastrophic events using data stored in free-text documents. Telehealth innovations let patients self-triage to the right level of care to incentivize use of the least expensive form of care available. Intermountain’s ProComp solution offers its providers on-the-spot transparency about the cost of instruments, drugs and devices they use. That innovation alone net the health system roughly $80 million in reduced costs between 2013 and 2015.

Most of Intermountain’s innovation initiatives are physician led or co-led. The program strives for small innovations in day-to-day work, supported by a suite of innovation support services and resource centers. Selected innovations from outside startups are supported by the company’s Healthbox Accelerator program involvement, while internal innovations are managed by the Intermountain Foundry. Intermountain offers online innovation idea submissions to promote easy participation. The health organization’s $35 million Innovation Fund supports innovations through formalized investment criteria and trustee governance resources. It is important to note that Intermountain Healthcare is interested in all aspects of innovation including supply chain and other non-clinical related projects.

Innovation at Mayo Clinic

Mayo Clinic’s Center for Innovation (CFI) brings in innovation best practices from both healthcare and non-healthcare backgrounds to drive new ideas. The innovation team’s external advisory council is comprised of both designers and physicians to drive innovation and efficiency in care delivery. The CFI features a Multidisciplinary Design Clinic that invites patients into the innovation process as well.

CFI staff found it was essential to show physicians data that demonstrated known problems and how proposed innovations could make a difference to their patients. They emphasize temporary changes, or “rapid prototyping,” to garner physician buy-in. Mayo’s CFI promotes employee involvement in innovative design through its Culture & Competency of Innovation platform, which features weekly meetings, institution-wide classes, lunch discussion groups and an annual symposium. Mayo’s innovation efforts include these additional physician-led platforms:

  • Mayo Clinic Connection—supporting shared physician experience
  • Prediction and Prevention
  • Wellness—promoting patient education
  • Destination Mayo Clinic—focused on improving patient experience

While these innovation examples represent large healthcare organizations, fostering innovation does not require a big budget. Mayo Clinic’s “think big, start small, move fast” approach to innovation illustrates a common thread among successful innovation programs. Here are practical strategies to advance innovation in healthcare, regardless of organizational size or budget.

Four Steps to Implementing an Innovation Program in Your Organization

Innovation doesn’t have to be grandiose or expensive. Organizations can start small. Begin by opening a companywide dialogue on innovation and launching a simple, online idea submission process to engage personnel in your organization. The most important part of this process is educating your teams to understand how to evaluate new innovations against a relatively pre-defined set of criteria.  For example, are you trying to improve patient safety, quality of care, reduce cost, increase patient or physician satisfaction, etc.

Another key element of successful innovation is encouraging collaboration and participation across a wide variety of stakeholders. Cross-functional teams bring multifaceted perspectives to the problem-solving process. Strive for incremental gains in facilitating opportunities for cross-department collaboration in your organization. This is particularly important for the implementation step.

Measure success using performance metrics where clinical efficiencies are concerned. Physician satisfaction, while difficult to quantify, can also pose big wins. You can expect some failures, but stack the odds by learning from other departments, organizations and industries to avoid making the same mistakes.

To work, innovation must happen often and organically. Dedicate funding, establish cross-department teams and build a formal process for vetting internal ideas. Consider offering staff incentives to drive engagement. Not all ideas will succeed. Identify metrics that will help determine ROI (not all ROIs are measured in dollars) on pilot programs so you can weed out initiatives that aren’t delivering early on to protect resources. Also, keep in mind that you can improve these innovations at each iteration.  Make the process iterative and roll out the initiatives quickly. If it fails, shut the process down quickly and move on. If it is successful, improve it for the next iteration and scale it quickly to maximize the benefits.

Whether you’re cross-pollinating internal teams to promote innovation, building partnerships with other organizations or leveraging technology to better connect providers and patients, healthcare’s ability to successfully collaborate is vital to advancing innovation in healthcare.

About Peyman S. Zand
Peyman S. Zand is a Partner at Pivot Point Consulting, a Vaco company, where he is responsible for strategic services solving healthcare clients’ complex challenges. Currently serving as interim regional CIO for Tenet Healthcare, Zand was previously a member of the University of North Carolina Healthcare System, leading Strategy, Governance, and Program/Project Management. He oversaw major initiatives including system-wide EHR implementation, regulatory programs, and physician practice rollouts. Prior to UNC, Zand formed the Applied Vision Group, a firm dedicated to assisting healthcare organizations with strategic planning, governance, and program and project management for key initiatives.

Zand holds a Bachelor’s of Science in Computational Mathematics and Engineering from Michigan State University, and a Master of Business Administration from the University of Michigan.

Operational CIO vs Strategic CIO

Posted on May 30, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve been thinking and writing about the difference between an operational CIO and a strategic CIO for quite a while. There are far too many operational CIOs in healthcare who just want to make sure that the computers are replaced, the internet is fast and that they have good uptime. I believe CIOs that take this approach are making a mistake because they’re turning themselves into a commodity as opposed to a strategic part of their organization.

If you’re not sure of the difference, David Chou shared this great graphic which illustrates the difference between an operational healthcare CIO vs a strategic healthcare CIO.

Do you think it matters if you’re an operational CIO or a strategic CIO? I look forward to your thoughts in the comments.

What Kind of User Experience Are You Offering Patients?

Posted on May 3, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Centric Digital put out a look at the User Experience Trends we should expect in healthcare in 2017. Check out their findings:

*Click on the image to see the larger version.

The summary on the image offers some great insights for hospitals and healthcare organizations as they consider their patient experience plans:

“In 2017, we’ll likely see increases in mobile-first & user-centered design, deep personalization, and conversational AI elements (e.g., bots) implemented across a range of sites for greater engagement.”

How’s your hospital doing at these items?

My guess is that most hospitals are not on trend. I wonder if hospitals even know what mobile-first is and how many have rolled out a mobile-first experience for their patients. My guess is that most hospitals have looked at their website on mobile and possibly implemented a responsive website.

Going beyond that, how many hospitals have created user-centered design. There’s a simple test to know if you’re focused on the user or not. Go to your hospital website and evaluate whether your website encourages engagement or whether your website discourages engagement by users. The reality is that most hospital websites discourage engagement.

We don’t even need to start down the road of discussing deep personalization and conversational AI elements. Let’s start with a mobile-first user centered design and then we can talk about the deep personalization and conversational AI that could benefit your hospital.

While I find these trends interesting, I don’t think I agree with Brenda who shared the image above that these will be the trends for 2017. This sounds more like where the cutting edge organizations are innovating as opposed to the industry trends.

How’s your organization doing in these areas? Are you offering these kinds of user experience to your patients?

Fear of Failure in Healthcare

Posted on May 1, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Healthcare has a culture where the expectation is that you should never fail. Because of this culture we often take too long to adjust and change. This fear of failing at something new often causes is to keep sub optimal situations that impact our patients in negative ways. Doing nothing can often have worse impacts than doing something that goes wrong.

I love the quote that Jared Johnson shared above “Too often we ask, “What if this goes wrong?” instead of, “What if this goes RIGHT?””

This is a powerful idea that many in healthcare need to learn. We’re too afraid of something going wrong that we don’t even think about all the things that could go right if we changed a process, changed a policy, implemented a new piece of technology, etc. You know you have this problem in your organization if you’ve ever asked why something is done that way and they say “It’s just how we’ve always done it.”

While it’s easy to blame the culture of healthcare for this problem it is something we can overcome. Or I should say that it is something a courageous healthcare leader can overcome. This culture all comes from the leaders who don’t frown upon employees who make mistakes, but instead reward those who take a risk that could be extremely beneficial to patients and the organization.

Courageous leaders are ones that aren’t afraid to do what’s right for patients even if it puts themselves at risk. This is not an easy thing to do. It’s always easier to go with the safe, reliable, “nobody gets fired for doing…” approach that’s so common in healthcare. It’s much harder to take a patient point of view and say that I’m going to do what’s right for the patient even when it might buck the organizational culture.

It’s time healthcare leaders fearlessly embraced changes that will improve healthcare. Yes, that will mean some risk of things going wrong. However, the best leaders mitigate the risks as much as possible, but focus on the positive benefits that will come when everything goes right.

The Challenge of Managing So Many Vendors

Posted on March 8, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The more I talk to CIOs, the more I realize that CIO at a hospital and health system is as much about vendor management as it is anything else. And quite frankly, those CIOs are tired and overwhelmed by all the vendor management they do. Every CIO I’ve met is looking to decrease the number of vendors they’re working with and not increase it.

In some ways it makes sense. Even if you look at the basic IT commodity items like servers, systems, storage, networking, security, single sign on, etc you’re probably looking at 14-16 vendors for most organizations. This doesn’t include all the higher end clinical systems (including the EHR) and all of the shadow IT systems that have seeped their way into departments thanks to easy to purchase and use cloud solutions.

At the higher end, I’ve heard of some health systems having 300 different systems that they had to manage. It’s a much smaller number at the lower end small, rural hospital, but it’s still a huge task for even them since they outsource almost everything. They usually can’t attract or afford long term staff to the rural hospitals.

Is it any wonder why that hospital CIO told me that “we’ve got what we need”?

I wonder if the real undercurrent of his comment was “I don’t want any more vendors to manage. I have more than enough!”

My guess is that this CIO who has “all the IT he needs” would probably have no problem looking at and implementing new features and functionality from their existing vendor. That’s a huge advantage for existing vendors as they continue to grow a bigger footprint in the hospitals where they have customers. However, are they missing out on a lot of innovations because of this approach?

At the end of the day, a CIO has to be an effective vendor manager. The better they do at this job, the better their organization will perform.

Cleveland Clinic Works To Eliminate Tech Redundancies

Posted on March 1, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

The Cleveland Clinic has relied on its EMR for quite some time. In fact, it adopted Epic in the 1990s, long before most healthcare organizations were ready to make a bet on EMRs. Today, decades later, the Epic EMR is the “central data hub” for the medical center and is central to both its clinical and operational efforts, according to William Morris, MD, the Clinic’s associate chief information officer.

But Morris, who spoke about the Clinic’s health IT with Health Data Management, also knows its limitations. In an interview with the magazine’s Greg Slabodkin, he notes that while the EMR may be necessary, it isn’t sufficient. The Epic EMR is “just a digital repository,” he told Slabodkin. “Ultimately, it’s what you do with the technology in your ecosystem.”

These days, IT leaders at the Clinic are working to streamline the layers of additional technology which have accreted on top of the EMR over the years. “As an early adopter of Epic, we have accumulated quite a bit of what I’ll call technical debt,” said Doug Smith, interim chief information officer. “What I mean by that is multiple enhancements, bolt-ons, or revisions to the core application. We have to unburden ourselves of that.”

It’s not that Clinic leaders are unhappy with their EMR. In fact, they’re finding ways to tap its power to improve care. For example, to better leverage its EMR data, the Cleveland Clinic has developed data-driven “risk scores” designed to let doctors know if patients need intervention. The models, developed by the Clinic’s Quantitative Health Sciences group, offer outcome risk calculators for several conditions, including cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

(By the way, if predictive analytics interest you, you might want to check out our coverage of such efforts at New York’s Mount Sinai Hospital, which is developing a platform to predict which patients might develop congestive heart failure and care for patients already diagnosed with the condition more effectively. I’ve also taken a look at a related product being developed by Google’s DeepMind, an app named Streams which will ping clinicians if a patient needs extra attention.)

Ultimately, though, the organization hopes to simplify its larger health IT infrastructure substantially, to the point where 85% of the HIT functionality comes from the core Epic system. This includes keeping a wary eye on Epic upgrades, and implementing new features selectively. “When you take an upgrade in Epic, they are always turning on more features and functions,” Smith notes. “Most are optional.”

Not only will such improvements streamline IT operations, they will make clinicians more efficient, Smith says. “They are adopting standard workflows that also exist in many other organizations—and, we’re more efficient in supporting it because we don’t take as long to validate or support an upgrade.”

As an aside, I’m interested to read that Epic is tossing more features at Cleveland Clinic than it cares to adopt. I wonder if those are what engineers think customers want, or what they’re demanding today?

Do Hospital CIOs Have the IT They Need?

Posted on February 27, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

While at a CIO reception at the HIMSS-CHIME Forum, I took part in an interesting conversation with a group of CIOs. They were talking about the number of phone calls they get from vendors. They had some unique insights and approaches into how they handled all the incoming messaging from vendors. I’ll save most of those insights for the Healthcare IT Marketing and PR conference that I host, but he also offered this interesting nugget when he said the following:

Our organization more or less has what we need to be successful. We aren’t looking to add more.

He did later acknowledge that if that wasn’t true, that they would go out and search for the vendors as opposed to an incoming call from a sales person.

This CIO’s comment struck me. I don’t think he was being so arrogant as to say that they weren’t going to purchase any more IT solutions. However, I think he was saying that he didn’t see any major enterprise purchases on his horizon.

On the one hand, I think that’s a sign of a maturing of the industry. His hospital organization finally had the IT tools they needed to be successful. That’s a good thing since I think if we’d had the conversation 3-5 years ago it would have been very different.

On the other hand, it’s kind of scary to think that this hospital CIO isn’t really looking at the IT environment around him and looking for new tools and solutions that could make his organization even better. This is a simple illustration of how every IT organization can get in a rut and stop innovating if we’re not careful.

At some point in any IT implementation, you have to step back and double down on the investments you’ve already made. There are huge opportunities in every healthcare organization I’ve seen to maximize the benefits they’re receiving from the IT they’ve already implemented. It’s fair to say that this CIO was at that stage of the game. It was time to stop searching and implementing other systems and time to optimize what’s already in place. That’s a good thing as long as it’s not taken too far.

I think the hospital health IT industry is largely in the same place as this CIO. Most aren’t looking to make new purchases. Instead, they want to extract value out of their previous purchases. What do you think? Have you seen this same sort of market maturity? Any idea on what will be next that will change this CIO and the industry’s thinking?

Hospital EMR and EHR Milestone – 1 Million Pageviews

Posted on February 13, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.


I was just looking over the stats for Hospital EMR and EHR and noticed that were right at 1 million pageviews for this site. That’s a pretty amazing accomplishment for such a niche site. Especially since we’ve moved a lot of the traffic off of the site and onto our email list. Looks like this will make the 1111th blog post for Hospital EMR and EHR and it has 25,293 email subscribers (Subscribe Here) to the content we generate on this site. That’s a really amazing thing since we email those on the list 3-5 times per week. Hospital EMR and EHR has become a really important part of Healthcare Scene and we’re happy to contribute to the hospital healthcare IT industry at large.

On this milestone, we want to thank some of our recent sponsors that have made what we do possible. If you enjoy reading our content, please take a second to look through our sponsors to see if one of them can help make your life easier.

Stericycle Communication Solutions – Stericycle has been a long time sponsor of multiple Healthcare Scene blogs. Plus, they have written the Communication Solutions Series of blog posts which are an excellent read if you’re interested in strategies for healthcare engagement. They also have a free guide that addresses the question Patient or Consumer? This is a great company that’s really working to make the patient experience better.

Galen Healthcare Solutions – We’ve had the chance to work with Galen Healthcare Solutions across a number of different mediums including email, display ads, and sponsored content. You’ve probably read their Tackling EHR and EMR Transition series where they’ve shared a lot of great insights into how your organization should handle archiving old legacy data and also how you can migrate data from one EHR to a new EHR. Both of these topics are going to become increasingly important and Galen Healthcare Solutions have become real experts. Be sure to check out their Free Data Archive whitepaper and their Free EHR Migration whitepaper.

Medical Software Advice (A Gartner Company) – I’ve been working with Medical Software Advice for a very long time. They’ve provided a really great service to my readers around EHR selection. With 300+ EHR vendors out there, it can be hard to cut through the various options. Medical Software Advice has helped out hundreds of companies with their EHR selection including setting up EHR demos and getting EHR pricing. Check out their Top 5 EHR Software list.

4Med – 4Med is another partner that we’ve worked with for a very long time. They’ve consistently offered some great educational content (include CEUs) for the healthcare IT professional. Here are some of their upcoming courses that are great examples: HIPAA Compliance Officer, Patient Centered Medical Home Project Manager, and ACI MACRA-MIPA Project Manager. Each of those links gives you a discount off the regular registration price.

HIPAAOne – HIPAA compliance has always been essential to healthcare, but meaningful use and now MACRA have made the HIPAA Risk Assessment a priority for many organizations. What’s shocking to me is how many organizations haven’t done a proper HIPAA Risk assessment. HIPAA One has created a really great software solution to automate your HIPAA Risk Assessment. I like to call them the Tax Act or H&R Block software for HIPAA compliance. If you’ve got a stack of Excel spreadsheets managing your HIPAA Risk Assessment, take a second to look at how HIPAAOne can make your job easier. Also, they have a great 5 min HIPAA compliance quiz to assess some of key HIPAA compliance areas.

We’re also excited to announce our new Healthcare Scene media kit. It’s been amazing to see the evolution of what we’re able to offer healthcare IT vendors. We really want to develop deep relationships with our advertisers and not just take their money and run. We think that’s the best thing for both our readers and our advertisers. If you’re trying to get the word out to the hospital market, let us how we can help on our contact us page.

I couldn’t finish this post without saying a massive thank you to our readers. It’s hard to know exactly what kind of impact you’re having when you blog. However, every once in a while you get a glimpse into the benefit your blog posts are providing readers and that makes it all worthwhile. Thank you to each of you who read and support our work.

Now, on to the next million pageviews!

Rumor Control: These are the Facts

Posted on January 16, 2017 I Written By

For the past twenty years, I have been working with healthcare organizations to implement technologies and improve business processes. During that time, I have had the opportunity to lead major transformation initiatives including implementation of EHR and ERP systems as well as design and build of shared service centers. I have worked with many of the largest healthcare providers in the United States as well as many academic and children's hospitals. In this blog, I will be discussing my experiences and ideas and encourage everyone to share your own as well in the comments.

Why is it that one of the largest challenges on any project is miscommunication and out of control rumors? While many projects need and would benefit from more communication, even with the best of communication plans, project teams can spend more time dispelling false information than proactively communicating.

I believe in strong communication plans for EHR and ERP projects that include a wide range of communication including town halls, newsletters, emails, signage, internet sites, and other methods of sharing correct information. But on every project, no matter how much we communicate, certain hospital staff will find other sources of information.

I can see the rumor coming when an email or conversation starts with “I heard that…” or “Is it true that…”. These are telltale signs that I am about to hear a rumor. Rumors can range from minor details to far-reaching implications such as a perceived change in project scope or even the live date. While most rumors are just annoyances, responding to them and controlling them can be a significant strain on the project team’s time.

I believe that hospitals have a unique challenge in that proactive communication is more challenging than in many traditional businesses because it is common for a large portion of the staff, including nurses and physicians, to rarely check email. As a result, they are often in a position where “hallway conversation” is how they first hear information and are more likely to give it credibility.

While I admit that I have personally never been able to fully eliminate the rumor challenge, I’d like to share several ideas about what I have seen as an effective way to keep the rumor mill under control:

1) Establish a clear Source of Truth – From the very beginning of the project, communicate to every possible audience how decision and communications will be distributed and who they should contact with questions and information. If it doesn’t come from one of the accepted Sources of Truth, its not true. When I lead a project, I prefer to be the Source of Truth – if it doesn’t come from me verbally or in writing, it isn’t true.

2) Encourage questions and respond to all of them timely – When I am running a project, my motto is “Ask me anything, anytime”. At times, I will get dozens or even hundreds of questions a day through meetings, phone calls, texts, and emails. I respond to every question, providing the truth if I have it, or getting them to the person who can provide the truth. Rumors often start because staff members are not getting answers or don’t feel their questions are welcomed. How do I respond to so many requests? I do it immediately so they can’t accumulate – which also helps inspire confidence and a feeling that they can ask rather than assume.

3) Town Halls – I strongly believe that a change management and communication strategy must include town halls. During town halls, project teams should provide an overview of what is occurring that is relevant to the staff, do occasional software demonstrations, and most importantly – field questions. Creating those proactive communication channels is a powerful way to avoid people creating their own truths.

4) Provide the complete truth – Sometimes the answer to a question is not known because it has not been determined, or has not been considered. Sometimes it is not what the person wants to hear. Regardless, provide the truth – and the complete truth. There is nothing wrong with saying that you don’t know – but can find out. Or that a decision has not been made, but now that they have raised the concern we will make it and get back to them. Responding immediately doesn’t always mean providing an answer immediately, as long as the follow-up is done once the answer is available.

5) Communicate Everywhere – A communication plan must be extensive and include many different points of contact. Intranet sites can look impressive and have lots of great information on them – but usually only a small percentage of the staff will check them. Consideration must be given as to how to communicate with contracted employees, physicians, and traveling nurses. This is particularly challenging during an EHR roll-out when all of these parties must be enrolled in training classes and kept up-to-date on the go-live. Find and use every possible communication challenge. There are always questions about how much communication is too much – but they apply to the volume of communication you push through a particular communication channel – not the number of different communication channels you use.

Finally, accept that no matter what you do, rumors will form and will need to be dispelled. Its part of project management and change management that always had existed, and always will. Properly controlled, the rumors can be a minor distraction at worst – entertainment at best.

Please share any ideas you have found to be successful in keeping rumors under control.

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